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Full text of "Announcements"

Bethany Theological Seminary 

Catholic Theological Union 

Chicago Theological Seminary 

DeAndreis Institute of Theology 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 

McCormick Theological Seminary 
Meadville/Lombard Theological School 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary 



luster of theological schools 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1981-1982 



COMMON ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

1981-1982 
FALL 



September 23-26 
September 28 
November 26-29 
December 1-3 
December 11 
December 12 - January 3 



January 4 
February 16-18 
March 19 
March 20-28 



WINTER 



SPRING 



March 29 
April 9 
May 18-21 
June 4 



Orientation and Registration 

Classes Begin 

Thanksgiving Recess 

Registration for Winter Quarter 

Fall Quarter Ends 

Christmas Recess 



Classes Begin 

Registration for Spring Quarter 

Winter Quarter Ends 

Spring Recess 



Classes Begin 

Good Friday Recess 

Pre-Registration for Fall Quarter 

Spring Quarter Ends 



1981 CALENDAR 1981 1982 CALENDAR 1982 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


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M 



1100 East 55th Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
Phone: (312)667-3500 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Foreword 3 

Chicago Cluster of Theological Schools — Basic Information 4 

Purpose and History 4 

Cluster Officers, Staff and 

Faculty Group Convenors 5 

The Nine Member Seminaries 6 

Cluster Services and Programs 10 

Library Services 10 

Cluster Theological Language Courses 11 

Center for Theology and Ministry 

in Global Perspective 12 

Information About Course Listings 13 

Format 13 

Abbreviations and Numbering 13 

How Cross-Registration Works 14 

Cluster Focus 14 

Course Changes r 14 

Course Offerings Organized by Subject Area 15 

Biblical Studies 15 

Old Testament 15 

New Testament 18 

Historical Studies 21 

Theological Studies 24 

Ethical Studies 29 

World Mission Studies 31 

Ministry: Its Nature and Practice 32 

Pastoral Care 34 

Liturgy and Worship 37 

Preaching and Communication 39 

Educational Ministry of the Church 40 

Canon Law 42 

Supervised Ministry 42 

Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 45 

Special Areas of Interest Within Cluster Courses of Study 45 

Hispanic Studies 45 

Black Studies 46 

Judaic Studies 46 

Women's Studies 47 

The Cluster Cooperative Courses 48 

The Cluster Areas of Concentration 49 



Course Descriptions (organized by Term) 53 

Summer 53 

Fall 54 

Biblical Studies 54 

Historical Studies 58 

Theological Studies 60 

Ethical Studies 64 

World Mission Studies 66 

Ministry Studies 67 

Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 76 

Winter 77 

Biblical Studies 77 

Historical Studies 81 

Theological Studies 83 

Ethical Studies 87 

World Mission Studies 88 

Ministry Studies 89 

Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 97 

Spring 98 

Biblical Studies 98 

Historical Studies 102 

Theological Studies 104 

Ethical Studies 107 

World Mission Studies 109 

Ministry Studies 110 

Interdisciplinary/Integrative Studies 119 

Cluster Personnel 120 

Faculty and Executive Officers 120 

Librarians 133 

Institutions With Which The Cluster Maintains Special Relations 135 

Center for Advanced Study in Religion and 

Science (CASIRAS ) 135 

Institute on the Church in Urban-Industrial 

Society (ICUIS) 136 

Spertus College of Judaica 138 

Chicago Theological Institute 139 

Chicago Area Colleges and Universities 139 

Changes and Additions 140 



FOREWORD 



According to a recent New York 
Times article the Chicago Cluster is 
"an experiment in theological 
education that many seminary experts 
believe to be the most broad-based 
and potentially influential design in 
the nation." After mentioning several 
other cooperative programs the author 
added that "none has created quite the 
attraction that the Chicago Cluster has 
generated." 

Why this attraction? 

Because the Chicago Cluster is 
broad-based. That is one reason. 
Evangelicals, Catholics, Liberal 
Protestants, Mainline Protestants, 
Jews and others in actual cross- 
registration sufficient to provide op- 
portunity for serious dialogue in 
numerous courses. Great varieties in 
personnel — in race, sex, nationality, 
age, theological understanding, etc. 
Yet each of the eight schools provides 
its own educational matrix and has as 
its purpose preparation for a par- 
ticular denomination and tradition. 
And all the schools concentrate upon 
preparation for professional ministry. 

Thus a student is invited into a 
richly varied context and an 
ecumenical fellowship in order to un- 
dertake disciplined intellectual effort 
and serious formation for the ministry 
of a particular church. 



This past year there were over 1200 
instances of cross-registration, which 
is a good sign that students are finding 
the value in a wide range of choice as 
they shape their own best educational 
experiences. 

This Chicago "experiment in 
theological education" provides a 
number of academic features which 
enrich the offerings for any student 
and assure an ecumenical component 
in that student's education. There are 
Cluster Intensives; some areas of 
study offer an interschool "focus"; 
some courses are team taught across 
school lines; some meet successively 
on several campuses, etc. These 
Cluster features are described on the 
pages that follow. 

Expanded library offerings through 
cooperation, ecumenical worship, out- 
standing visiting lecturers, and a num- 
ber of other events and programs 
enrich the educational milieu for 
students of the Cluster schools. 

Both as an ecumenical community 
and as an educational consortium the 
Chicago Cluster shows signs of 
vitality and growth which translate in- 
to an exciting and enriching context 
for the study of theology and for 
preparation for ministry. 

Frederick K. Wentz 
Executive Director 



CHICAGO CLUSTER OF THEOLOGICAL SCHOOLS 



PURPOSE AND HISTORY 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools is an ecumenical association 
of six Protestant and two Roman 
Catholic seminaries. Its stated purpose 
has been to facilitate and coordinate 
education for ministry which would 
be of the highest quality, broadly 
ecumenical, and fiscally efficient. 

The Cluster was organized in 1970 
and incorporated as a not-for-profit 
corporation in 1971. All Cluster 
schools are members of the 
Association of Theological Schools in 
the United States and Canada. Each of 
the six Protestant schools is affiliated 
with a corresponding denomination. 
The two Roman Catholic schools of- 
ficially represent or serve twenty-one 
religious orders of men and ninteen 
communities of women. 

Jewish presence and studies have 
been provided during these years 
through cooperating institutions. 

Five of the eight member schools are 
grouped closely together on the south 
side of Chicago adjacent to the 
University of Chicago. Two are 
located on contiguous campuses in 
west suburban Oak Brook and Lom- 
bard and one is situated in the south- 
west suburb of Lemont. 

The Cluster's diverse and extensive 
networks of resources for theological 
education are unparalleled in the Mid- 
west and are among the most out- 



standing in North America. The eight 
Cluster schools offer a variety of 
academic and professional degrees at 
the master's and doctoral levels, and 
programs of continuing education for 
clergy and laity. The almost 1,500 
Cluster students have access to re- 
sources such as those represented by its 
large and diverse faculty; about 400 
courses annually; library collections 
of over 800,000 volumes and 2970 
currently received periodicals; con- 
temporary electronic media equipment 
(including portable and studio video 
capabilities) and modern language 
laboratory facilities; and three centers 
for specialized research and ministry 
dealing, respectively, with religion 
and science, the church and urban- 
industrial society, and theology and 
ministry in global perspective. 

Beyond the resources of the Cluster 
are those of six other Chicago-area 
theological schools upon which 
Cluster students may draw, together 
with the vast resources of numerous 
institutions of higher learning and in- 
numerable organizations and agencies 
of a religious, humanitarian, cultural 
and scientific character in and about 
the metropolitan environs. 

This ecumenical association of 
seminaries does not, as a Cluster, 
grant degrees. Application for study 
within the Cluster is made to the in- 
dividual member schools. 



OFFICERS, STAFF AND FACULTY GROUP CONVENERS 



Cluster Common Council 

Officers 

Chairperson To be announced 

Vice-Chairperson To be announced 

Treasurer To be announced 

Secretary Frederick K. Wentz 

Representatives of Member Institutions 

Bethany Theological Seminary Warren F. Groff 

Catholic Theological Union John Linnan, C.S.V. 

Chicago Theological Seminary C. Shelby Rooks 

DeAndreis Institute of Theology John Rybolt, CM. 

Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago William E. Lesher 

McCormick Theological Seminary Jack L. Stotts 

Meadville/ Lombard Theological School Gene Reeves 

Northern Baptist Theological Seminary William R. Myers 

Representative of Deans To be announced 
Representative of Librarians Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. 

Administrative Officers and Staff 

Executive Director Frederick K. Wentz 

Associate Director Rose H. Arthur 

Director of Library Programs Hedda Durnbaugh 

Director of Global Perspective Center To be announced 

International Programs Coordinator To be announced 

Student Affairs Coordinator To be announced 

Secretary Ellen L. Young 

Cluster Faculty Group Conveners To be announced 

Old Testament 
New Testament 
Church History 
Theology 
Ethics 

World Mission 
Pastoral Care 
Worship and Preaching 
Religious Education 
Supervised Ministry 



THE NINE MEMBER SEMINARIES 

BETHANY THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



Bethany education is shaped by Church of the Brethren concerns in such areas as 
peace, discipleship, and servanthood. It seeks to provide a community of scholar- 
ship and faith where insistence upon academic excellence is balanced by concern 
for personal growth. Curricular design includes peer accountability groupings 
oriented toward integration of heritage and ministerial competencies. 

President Warren F. Groff 

Dean Graydon F. Snyder 

Director of Graduate Studies Donald E. Miller 

Director of Student Services John J. Cassel 

Treasurer and Business Manager John A. Eichelberger 

Director of Development E. Floyd McDowell 

Registrar N. Geraldine Plunkett 

Degree Programs: Time Beyond A.B. 

Name of Degree Normally Required 

M.A.Th. 2 years 

M.Div. 3 years 

D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 9 years 

Butterfield and Meyers Roads 

Oak Brook, Illinois 60521 

(312) 620-2200 




CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 



A collaborative school serving twenty religious orders, founded to promote di- 
verse theological and ministerial traditions within the Roman Catholic Church. Em- 
phasis on preparation for ministry, hence flexible academic pattern augmented by 
strong field education programs. Other special features: fully individualized M.A. 
Program; World Mission Program designed to prepare American and foreign 
students to minister in other cultures. Programs open to all serious students, men 
and women. 

Acting President John Linnan, C.S.V. 

Vice President and Dean Robert Schreiter, C.PP.S. 

Director of M.Div. Program John Paul Szura, O.S.A. 

Director of M.A. Program John Pawlikowski, O.S.M. 



Dean of Students 


Theresa Monroe 


Treasurer and Business Manager 


Michael Hill, O.F.M. 


Registrar 


Mildred A. Henke 


Degree Programs : 


Time Beyond A.B. 


Name of Degree 


Normally Required 


M.T.S. 


2 years 


M.A. in Theology 


2 years 


M.Div. 


3-4 years 


M.Div. with Mission Specialization 


3-4 years 


M.Div. with Word and Worship Specialization 3-4 years 


5401 South Cornell Avenue 


Chicago, Illinois 60615 




(312) 324-8000 






CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

An ecumenical Seminary related to the United Church of Christ. A style fostering 
rigorous theological inquiry and development of students' own intellectual and 
professional integrity in an atmosphere of diversity and freedom. The basic 
professional degree program is the three year Master of Divinity, but the Master of 
Arts in Religious Studies may be awarded at the end of the second year as a ter- 
minal master's degree. The post-M.Div. Doctor of Ministry is available full or 
part-time for students with experience in ministry, or the desire for more focused 
professional doctoral work immediately following the M.Div. Joint programs with 
pastoral care institutions are available. The academic doctorate is awarded in con- 
nection with other cluster schools in several areas. 




President 

Academic Dean 

Registrar 

Director of Field Education 

Chaplain and Coordinator of Student Life 

and Community Activities 
Director of Recruitment, Admissions, 

and Financial Aid 
Vice-President for Business Affairs 
Vice-President for Development 
Degree Programs 



M.A. in Religious Studies 

M. Div. 

D.Min. 

Th.D. (with other schools) 

5757 South University Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 752-5757 



C. Shelby Rooks 

Yoshio Fukuyama 

Cherie Miller 

To be announced 

M. Elizabeth Bacon 

Richard D. Lewis 

Joseph T. Dye 

Richard S. Ferris 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 
4 to 5 years 

6 years 



DE ANDREIS INSTITUTE OF THEOLOGY 



A professional institute of theological and ministerial studies owned and conducted 
by the Vincentian Fathers. De Andreis offers a M.A. program for students in- 
terested in teaching Theology, a M.Div. program for those interested in the 
professional ministry, and an Ordination program to prepare candidates for the 
Catholic priesthood. The institute seeks to fulfill its ministry in the Church by of- 
fering its programs, educational facilities and personnel to those who seek a deeper 
understanding of the faith and practice of the Church. 
President John Rybolt, CM. 

Academic Dean James A. Fischer, CM. 

Dean Philip VanLinden, CM. 

Business Manager Anthony J. Wiedemer, CM. 

Registrar John P. Minogue, CM. 

Degree Programs: Time Beyond the A.B. 

Name of Degree Normally Required 

M.A. in Theology 2 years 

M.Div. 4 years 

511 East 127th Street 
Lemont, Illinois 60439 
(312) 257-5454 



c 



a 



institute of theology 



LUTHERAN SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY AT CHICAGO 

Preparation for professional ministry in the church, advanced studies in ministry, 
academic study of theology. Curriculum features strong accent upon study of the 
traditions of the Church and a comprehensive field work program. A seminary of 
the Lutheran Church in America. 

President 

Vice President for Development 

Dean of Faculty 

Dean of Students 

Director of Graduate Studies 

Director of Doctor of Ministry and 

Continuing Education Program 
Director of Admissions and Registrar 
Degree Programs : 
Name of Degree 

M.A.R. 

M.T.S. 



#m 



<y 




M.Div. 
Th.M. 
Th.D. 
D.Min. 



William E. Lesher 

Donovan J. Palmquist 

Franklin Sherman 

Jean Bozeman 

Philip Hefner 

Robert I. Tobias 

Laurie Gungel 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 
2 years 

4 years 

5 years 
7 years 

10 years 



(3 years in ministry prerequisite) 
1100 East 55th Street 
Chicago, Illinois 60615 
(312) 667-3500 

McCORMICK THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

McCormick is a theological center for the United Presbyterian Church in the 
U.S.A. It also welcomes many students from outside this denomination. It focuses 
its resources on education for the ministry, emphasizing both pre-professional 
(M.A.T.S. & M.Div.) and professional (D.Min.) studies. Its programs in Latino 
Studies, Women's Studies, and Urban Ministry, its dual competency programs in 
Social Work, theological librarianship, and other fields, and its emphasis on in- 
ternationalization add to its other offerings. Students are encouraged to plan, with 
advice, their own courses of study. 



President 

Dean of the Seminary 

Director of Doctor of Ministry Program 

Dean of Student Life 

Vice President for Seminary Relations 

Business Manager 

Registrar 

Degree Programs : 

Name of Degree 

M.A. in Theological Studies 

M.Div.* 

M.Div. /M.S.W. 

M.Div. /M.A.L.S. 

Th.M. 

D.Min. (2 years in ministry prerequisite) 



Jack L. Stotts 

Lewis S. Mudge 

Robert C. Worley 

Pauline Coffman 

Raymond A. Bowden 

Anthony Ruger 

Shirley S. Dudley 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally Required 

2 years 

3 years 

4 years 
4 years 
4 years 
8 years 




* May be taken with specialization in Latino studies. Diploma 
in Latino Studies (3 year program) may be converted to M.Div. 
upon completion of baccalaureate degree. 

5555 South Woodlawn Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 60637 



(312) 241-7800 



8 



MEADVILLE/LOMBARD THEOLOGICAL SCHOOL 

Meadville /Lombard is a small, independent school whose central mission and pur- 
pose is preparation for ministry, primarily for parish ministry within the societies 
of the Unitarian Universalist Association. Neither Unitarian Universalist mem- 
bership nor intention to seek ordination for parish ministry is a requirement for 
enrollment. The academic program leading to the M.Div. or D.Min. degree is 
closely related to the Divinity School of the University of Chicago, with which 
Meadville/Lombard is affiliated, and includes a University's A.M. degree. 



ul 



Dean and Chief Executive 

Business Manager 

Admissions Officer, Dean of Students 

Librarian 

Registrar 

Degree Programs : 

Name of Degree 

M.Div. 

D.Min. 



Gene Reeves 

R?ndall Vaughn 

Neil H. Shadle 

Neil W. Gerdes 

To be announced 

Time Beyond A.B. 

Normally required 

3 years 

4 years 



5701 South Woodlawn Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60637 

(312) 753-3195 

NORTHERN BAPTIST THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

The educational purpose of the Seminary is the graduate professional theological 
education of men and women for ministry. The study and application of the Scrip- 
tures is considered foundational. The faculty promotes free discussion and inquiry 
in a community of scholars. Growth of the whole person is fostered in a caring 
community. The Seminary has an evangelical commitment, is related to the 
American Baptist Churches, U.S.A., welcomes students from all Christian 
traditions and encourages participation in ecumenical dialogue. 



President 


William R. Myers 


Dean 


To be announced 


Assistant to the President for 


Richard G. Gerber 


Business Affairs 




Assistant to the President for Development 


Adam Baum 


Director of Doctoral Studies 


E. Alfred Jenkins 


Director of Masters Studies 


Eric H. Ohlmann 


Director of Hispanic Studies 


Osvaldo L. Mottesi 


Registrar 


Betty L. Beaman 


Director of Field Services 


William R. Nelson 


Director of Church Relations 


Robert L. Maase 


Director of Financial Aid 


James Jones 


Admissions Counselor 


Susan G. Grisham 


Degree Programs : 


Time Beyond A.B. 


Name of Degree 


Normally Required 


M.A. in Christian Education 


2 years 


M.A. in Theological Studies 


2 years 


M.Div. 


3 years 


D.Min. (3 years in ministry prerequisite) 


9 years 


660 East Butterfield Road 




Lombard, Illinois 60148 




(312) 620-2200 





ItZorthern baptist 
theological seminary 



CLUSTER SERVICES AND PROGRAMS 

LIBRARY SERVICES 



The Cluster supports a vigorous 
library program which provides many 
benefits to students and faculty. The 
combined Cluster library collections 
comprise over 800,000 volumes and 
represent one of the largest collections 
among the theological consortia in the 
nation. A Union List of 2,970 current 
periodicals assist Cluster library users 
in locating desired titles. All Cluster 
library users have access to a Cluster 
Union Catalog of holdings completed 
in 1979, which is located at the Jesuit/ 
Krauss (Lutheran)/McCormick Li- 
brary, and has in it all the holdings 
of the Cluster as well as the Divinity 
collection of the University of 
Chicago. The loan of books or 
periodicals between Cluster schools is 
facilitated by the use of interlibrary 
facsimile devices and a courier system, 
and direct access to all Cluster 
libraries is provided by a Cluster I.D. 
card. A staff of eighteen library 
professionals with various subject 
specializations is available to assist 
users with reference and research 
problems. The Cluster libraries have 
uniform policies for loan periods, care 
of reserve books, reference books, 
periodicals, and costs for photo- 
copying. 

Other Cluster library cooperative 
programs that benefit users are a coor- 
dinated joint acquisitions program for 
books, periodicals, and monograph 
series. The Cluster libraries participate 
in the services of OCLC, Inc., a 
nationally linked, computer based 
cataloguing operation. 

Beyond the Cluster library resources 
are those of other Chicago seminaries 
and universities, the Chicago Public 
Library, Newberry Library, and John 
Crerar Library. All Cluster libraries 
belong to the Illinois Library and In- 



formation Network (ILLINET) which 
provides access to statewide library 
resources as well as the bibliographic 
services of OCLC, Inc. 

Each Cluster library has its special 
strengths or collections. Below is a 
brief description of the kinds of 
special holdings to be found in the 
Cluster : 

The Library of Bethany and North- 
ern Baptist Theological Seminaries: 
The collection of some 130,000 
volumes and 687 currently received 
periodicals represents the combined 
libraries of Bethany and Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminaries. 
Special strengths are in Baptist 
history, Church of the Brethren 
history, peace studies, Pietism, and 
psychological journals. 

The special collections are located in 
a restricted-access area and contain: 
the Abraham H. Cassel Collection of 
16th through 19th-century theological 
books and pamphlets and a nearly- 
complete collection of American Tract 
Society publications, the Ora Huston 
Collection of over four hundred 
volumes of English Bibles (BTS) ; Bap- 
tist Association records, American 
Baptist Convention records, Danish 
and Norwegian Baptist Seminary 
material, the Donald W. Dayton 
Collection of 19th-century 

evangelicalism, and the Olmstead 
Collection in Ancient and Near 
Eastern Languages and Literature (NB- 
TS). 

Catholic Theological Union: 
Primarily a Roman Catholic 
theological collection, the library 
holds 84,000 volumes with special 
strengths in the areas of canon law, 
homiletics, missiology, and Scripture. 
Emphasis is on pastoral ministry 
materials in the English language. 



10 



Currently 480 periodicals are received. 
Chicago Theological Seminary: The 

collection comprises 90,000 volumes 
of monographs, 265 currently received 
periodicals, and 25 periodicals on 
microform, as well as audio-visual 
materials. Subject strengths are in the 
areas of English-language Bibles, 
church history, theology, Christian 
education, Eastern orthodoxy, ethics, 
pastoral theology, psychology, social 
sciences, Hebraica, and Judaica. 

The Special Collections contain the 
Anton Boisen Collection in 
Psychology, the Community Renewal 
Society Papers, and the Harry and 
Cora Lowenbach Congregational 
Heritage Library. 

DeAndreis Institute of Theology: 
The collection contains 34,600 
volumes of books and 210 currently 
received periodicals. Special strengths 
are in the areas of Roman Catholic 
theology, patristics (sources), and Vin- 
centiana. 

Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library : 
The collection of some 400,000 
volumes and 1,200 periodical sub- 
scriptions represent the combined 
libraries of Jesuit, Lutheran, and Mc- 
Cormick theological seminaries. 
Special strengths are in Jesuitica, 
modern and contemporary continental 
philosophy, patristics, medieval 
scholastic theology, and Catholic 
systematic theology; church history, 
Lutheran orthodoxy, Pietism, and 
recent continental theology; biblical 
studies (incl. biblical archaeology), 
Reformation, and Evans' American 
Bibliography in microform. 

The Special Collections contain: 
published and unpublished materials 
related to the history of the Lutheran 
Church of America, United Lutheran 
Church, Augustana Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, American 
Evangelical Lutheran Church 
(Danish), and the Finnish Evangelical 
Lutheran Church (Suomi Synod), the 



Gruber Collection of Greek MSS from 
the 9th-15th centuries, early editions 
of German and English Bibles; 
Presbyteriana and the Condit and 
Simms English Bible Collections. 

The Ecumenical Parish Resource 
Center (EPRC): administered by the 
Jesuit/Krauss (Lutheran) /McCormick 
Libraries and located at LSTC, 
provides a variety of current resources 
for use in church programs. The Cen- 
ter's resources include more than 50 
religious education curricula; a special 
collection of materials pertaining to 
the various functions of the 
congregation, including worship, 
stewardship, church organization, 
education and simulation games. 
Along with such resources, the staff of 
the Center provides unique services in 
assisting denominational officials, 
pastors, seminary students and layper- 
sons in developing meaningful 
programs for their judicatories, 
congregations, groups or classes. 
Interested parties are invited to con- 
tact the Center for further in- 
formation. 

Meadville/ Lombard Theological 
School: The collection contains over 
90,000 volumes and 131 currently 
received and 260 discontinued 
periodicals. Special strengths are in 
the areas of Unitarian philosophy, 
social ethics, and history of religions.. 

The Special Collections contain the 
papers of Wm. Ellery Channing, 
Jenkin Lloyd Jones, and A. Powell 
Da vies. 



CLUSTER THEOLOGICAL 
LANGUAGE COURSES 

In addition to the courses in biblical 
languages listed among the regular 
course offerings, non-credit courses in 
French, German and Latin are offered 
through the Cluster during each quar- 
ter of the academic year as warranted 
by student interest. The aim of the 



11 



courses is to assist students to achieve 
facility in reading theological 
literature in the respective languages. 
Such facility is frequently employed to 
fulfill language requirements for cer- 
tain degree programs. A nominal fee is 
charged. For further information con- 
tact the Cluster office. 

CENTER FOR THEOLOGY AND 
MINISTRY IN GLOBAL 
PERSPECTIVE 

Historical Background. Since its in- 
ception the Cluster has embodied a 
deepening commitment to the in- 
ternationalization of theological 
education. This commitment has ex- 
pressed itself through such diverse 
forms as extensive World Mission 
Study course offerings, a unique 
Cluster Area of Concentration in 
Cross-Cultural Communication, an 
Annual World Mission Institute, 
seminary-sponsored programs for 
overseas study and for faculty-student 
exchange with theological schools 
around the world, and various local 
programs planned by, with, and for 
international students and visiting 
faculty and lecturers from other 
nations. 

In order to strengthen its com- 
mitment to bring international per- 
spectives to bear upon all aspects of 
theological education within its mem- 
ber schools and to secure resources to 
enhance such endeavors the Cluster 
established a Center for Theology and 
Ministry in Global Perspective. Under 
the leadership of its Director and with 
the continuing assistance of its In- 
ternational Programs Coordinator and 
the Cluster Committee on In- 
ternational Programs, the "Global 
Perspective Center" (GPC) explores 
more effective ways of illuminating 
theological study, ministerial 
preparation, and continuing education 
with insights and experiences of an in- 
ternational character as well as ways 



of contributing through the iden- 
tification and elucidation of new 
theological problems, towards a more 
effective Church ministry in an ever 
changing world. 

Resources. The GPC offers a rich 
setting in which to study theology and 
to begin or continue preparation for 
mission and ministry in a world per- 
spective. Ecumenically, the heritages 
of six Protestant and two Roman 
Catholic schools of the Cluster are 
complemented by those of neigh- 
boring theological schools which com- 
prise the Chicago Theological In- 
stitute. Educationally, the aforemen- 
tioned curriculur and extra-curricular 
resources of the Cluster schools are 
enhanced by those of the Chicago 
Theological Institute and the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, which latter provides 
wide offerings in languages and area 
studies. Cluster students from schools 
located in Hyde Park enjoy significant 
tuition reduction for work taken con- 
currently in the University and its 
Divinity School. 

Cluster World Mission Institute 

The tenth annual Cluster World 
Mission Institute will be held April 19- 
23, 1982. With ecumenical and in- 
ternational leadership, the Institute 
brings together students, missionaries, 
pastors, administrators, and scholars 
to identify and address problems and 
concerns that are of transcultural and 
international import. 

Institute topics in recent years have 
included Mission in One World, 
Evangelization and Human Develop- 
ment in the Third World, From In- 
dependence to Interdependence in 
World Mission and Churches in 
Revolutionary Situations, Puebla: Im- 
plications for Mission in the 1980's? A 
list of available publications, 
manuscripts, and cassette tapes related 
to previous Institutes may be obtained 
from the Cluster office. 



12 



INFORMATION ABOUT COURSE LISTINGS 



FORMAT 

Courses in the Cluster are listed in the 
Announcements in two ways. First, all 
courses are listed according to area of 
study (under Biblical studies, 
Historical studies, etc.) This listing in- 
cludes only course number, title, 
professor, time, and quarter offered. 
Then, in the second part of the An- 
nouncements, all courses are listed 
again with a course description, this 
time arranged according to the quarter 
in which the course is offered. Some 
courses are listed under more than one 
area of study. 

However, the course description oc- 
curs only once unless specifically in- 
dicated otherwise, and is located un- 
der the area of study which the letter 
in the title signifies (e.g., M- 
course descriptions are found under 
the Ministry section in each quarter) . 

ABBREVIATIONS AND 
NUMBERING 

Each course number is preceded by the 
initials of the institution(s) by which it 
is offered. 

BTS — Bethany Theological 

Seminary 
CTU — Catholic Theological Union 
CTS — Chicago Theological 

Seminary 
DIT — DeAndreis Institute of 

Theology 
LSTC — Lutheran School of Theology 

at Chicago 
M/L — Meadville/ Lombard 

Theological School 
MTS — McCormick Theological 

Seminary 
NBTS —Northern Baptist 

Theological Seminary 
CCTS Chicago Cluster of 

Theological Schools 



Most Cluster schools employ the 
following lettering system for 
designating the field of each course of 
study : 

B —Biblical Studies 

H — Historical Studies 

T — Theological Studies 

E — Ethical Studies 

W —World Mission Studies 
M —Ministry Studies 
I — Interdisciplinary/Integrative 

Studies 

Chicago Theological Seminary em- 
ploys the following lettering system 
for designating the field of each course 
of study : 

CH — Christian Heritage 
TEC —Theology, Ethics and Con- 
temporary Culture 
CM —Christian Ministries 

The Cluster schools employ a com- 
mon numbering system for 
designating the level of each course of 
study. The levels of study are as 
follows : 

300-399 —Introductory 
400-499 —Intermediate 
500-599 —Advanced 
600-699 —Doctoral (In-Ministry 
D.Min., Th.D.) 

TBAr — To be arranged (refers to 
professors or time for a course) . 
T-Tuesday Th-Thursday 

Unless indicated in parentheses 
following the course listing, each entry 
is a full course valued at 3 or 4 quarter 
hours credit. 

Tutorial or Independent Study may be 
pursued in most of the areas of study, 
upon request of the student and ap- 
proval of the instructor and the deans 
of the schools involved. 

Courses added or rescheduled at the 
time the Announcements went to press 
are listed on pages 140-141. 



13 



HOW CROSS-REGISTRATION 
WORKS 

Students of any of the Cluster 
schools may take courses from any of 
the other Cluster schools directly and 
with no added charges. This 
operational relationship also exists 
between the Cluster and the Spertus 
College of Judaica and between the 
Cluster and the Chicago Theological 
Institute. Special cross-registering 
arrangements also exist between cer- 
tain of the Cluster schools and other 
colleges and universities in the 
Chicago area. Details about these 
arrangements can be obtained from in- 
dividual schools. 

Exceptions to this process of cross- 
registration exist a) during the summer 
quarter when tuition is normally paid 
the school offering the course; b) for 
D.Min. courses other than Pastoral 
Care and Counseling; c) in certain 
courses of limited enrollment. The 
Cluster schools reserve the right to 
limit enrollment in certain courses for 
pedagogical reasons, and to set their 
own policies for the admission of 
students from other schools to such 
courses. Courses limited to small num- 
bers because they are taught in 
seminar or practicum style are so in- 
dicated in this Announcements. 
Students are advised that certain other 
courses may at times grow so large 
that enrollment in them must be 
restricted in the registration process or 
during the first week of classes. Every 
effort will be made to inform students 
of this possibility as early as possible 
through the Registrars of their own 
schools. It is strongly recommended 
that students planning to enroll in 



courses which are, or may be, limited 
make alternative course selections in 
advance. The courses described above 
are marked in the Announcements. 

CLUSTER FOCUS 

In two areas of study, Old 
Testament and Educational Ministry, 
a student may take a set of 4 or 5 
courses, chosen from various 
categories, which make up a Focus of 
study. A Focus involves not only a 
certain degree of specialization but 
also an ecumenical dimension in in- 
struction. Depending on guidelines of 
each member school, a Focus may be 
noted on the student's transcript as 
part of the record of work. Please con- 
sult Old Testament (p. 15) and 
Educational Ministry (p. 40) for 
details. 

COURSE CHANGES 

Changes in course offerings are 
inevitable, right up to the start of the 
individual quarter. In an effort to 
make the Announcements as current 
and accurate as possible, this section 
will include changes which have oc- 
curred just before the final printing. 
Additional courses will have their 
descriptions included at this point, 
rather than under the quarter offered. 
To indicate changes or reschedulings 
within the regular course listings, 
"Changed" will be stamped next to the 
existing information. Finally, at the 
beginning of each quarter, complete 
course listings for that quarter in every 
school are made available to all 
students. 



14 



COURSE OFFERINGS ORGANIZED BY SUBJECT AREA 



BIBLICAL STUDIES: 
OLD TESTAMENT 



two or more to be taught by faculty 
members from other member schools: 

Canonical Corpus 

Theology 

Hermeneutics or Rabbinics 

Old Testament World 



In addition to such Introductory 
Courses as may be designated by the 
school of primary registration, a 
Cluster Focus in Old Testament shall 
consist of five courses, including 
Biblical Hebrew, and representing at 
least three of the following subgroups, 

I. INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

A. General 

1. LSTC B-330 Bible Survey 

Fuerst MW 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. Fall 

2. DIT B-341 General Introduction to Scripture 

Fischer, VanLinden MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. Fall 

B. Introductions to the Old Testament 

1. CTU B-300 A, B, C Old Testament Introduction 

Bergant Sec. A: MW 12:00 noon -1:15 p.m. Fall 

Hoppe Sec. B: MW 1:30 -2:45 p.m. Fall 

Sec. C: M 7:00 -9:30 p.m. Fall 

2. CTS CH-301 People & Faith of Israel I 

Lacocque MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Fall 

3. CTS CH-302 The People & Faith of Israel II 

Lacocque MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Winter 

4. BTS B-323 Introduction to the Old Testament 

Roop TTh 8:00 -9:20 a.m. Fall 

C. Introductory Sequences 

1 . MTS B-301 The Yah wist Revolution : 

Introduction to the Old Testament 
Campbell MW 2:00 - 3:50 p.m. Fall 

2. LSTC B-310 Old Testament Studies I 

Fuerst, Michel MWF 9 : 00 - 9 : 50 a.m. Fall 

3. LSTC B-311 Old Testament Studies II 

Fuerst, Michel MWF 9:00 - 9:50 a.m. Winter 

4. LSTC B-312 Old Testament Studies III 

Fuerst, Michel MWF 9:00 - 9:50 a.m. Spring 

5. MTS B-312 From David to Daniel : 

History, Literature, Theological Ferment 
Boling MW 10: 00 -11 :50 a.m. Winter 

6. NBTS B-323 Old Testament I: Archaeology, History and Content 
Bjornard WF 10:40 a.m. - 12:00 noon Fall 

7. NBTS B-324 Old Testament II : Literature 

Bjornard TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 20 a.m. Winter 



15 



Old Testament 



9. 



10. 



11. 



NBTS B-325 Old Testament III: Theology 

Bjornard TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. 

NBTS B-325A Old Testament: A Third World Reading 

TBA Th 6:00 -9:00 p.m. 

DIT B-442 Old Testament Survey I 

Fischer MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 

DIT B-443 Old Testament Survey II 

Fischer MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

A. General 

1 . BTS B-324 Old Testament Exegesis : Genesis 
Roop WF 8:00 -9:20 a.m. 

2. NBTS B-523 The Israelite Priesthood 
Bjornard WF 2:10 - 3:30 p.m. 

B. Pentateuch, Joshua and Judges and Deuteronomistic History 

1. CTU B-400 Pentateuch 

Bergant MW 12:00 noon - 1:15 p.m. 

2. CTU B-405 Deuteronomistic History 
Bergant TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

3. MTS B-440 1st and 2nd Samuel 

Boling F 9:00 -11:50 a.m. 

4. MTS B-441 Exodus 

Boling TTh 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

5. LSTC B-511 Genesis 1-11 

Michel T 7:00 -10:00 p.m. 

C. Prophets 

1. CTS CH-410 Exegesis of the Old Testament II 
Lacocque MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. 

2. MTS B-411 Israel's Eighth-Century Prophets 
Campbell MW 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

3. CTU B-415 Evolving Forms of Prophecy in Later Israel 
Hoppe MW 1:30 -2:45 p.m. 

4. NBTS B-425 Interpretation of Hosea 
Bjornard TTh 8:00-9:20 a.m. 

5. NBTS B-428 Interpretation of Jeremiah 
Bjornard WF 10:40 a.m. - 12:00 noon 

6. LSTC B-512 Studies in Jeremiah 

Fuerst MWF 8:00 - 8:50 a.m. 

D. Psalms 

1. CTU B-420 A, B Psalms 

Stuhlmueller Sec. A: TTh 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

Sec. B: T 7:00 -9:30 p.m. 

2. LSTC B-513 Psalms 

Michel MW 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. 

E. Wisdom Literature 

1. CTS CH-412 Exegesis of the Old Testament III/Qoheleth 
Lacocque M 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. 



Spring 
Winter 
Winter 
Spring 

Winter 
Winter 

Spring 
Winter 
Winter 
Spring 
Spring 

Spring 
Winter 
Winter 
Fall 
Spring 
Spring 

Spring 

Fall 

(Ecclesiastes) 
Fall 



16 



Old Testament 



2. BTS B-420 Job and Proverbs 

Roop TTh 11:00 a.m. -12:20 p.m. 

3. CTU B-425 Wisdom Literature 

Bergant TTh 12:00 noon - 1:15 p.m. 

4. CTU B-490 Biblical Foundations of Mission 
Bergant, Senior MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

5. CTU B-509 Seminar in Job 

Bergant T 1:30 - 4:00 p.m. 

6. DIT B-546 The Wisdom Tradition 
Fischer W 

7. CTS CH-610A Second Temple Period Literature Qoheleth 

(Ecclesiastes) 
Lacocque T 9:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. 



III. THEOLOGY 



BTS B-325 Old Testament Theology 
Roop WF 10:40 a.m. -12:00 noon 

CTS CH-402 Theology of the Old Testament II 
Lacocque T 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. 

C. MTS B-423 Wealth and Poverty in the Bible 
Collins T 7:00 -9:50 p.m. 

BTS B-426 The Covenant in Biblical Tradition 
Meyer WF 10:40 a.m. - 12:00 noon 

CTU B-490 Biblical Foundations of Mission 
Bergant/ Senior MW 9 : 00 - 10 : 15 a.m. 

BTS B-521 Nonviolence and the Biblical Traditions 
Roop, Meyer W 2:10 - 4:55 p.m. 



B 



D 



IV. HERMENEUTICS OR RABBINICS 

A. CCTS B-453 Current Issues in Jewish-Christian Dialogue' 

M 7:00 -10:00 p.m. 



Perelmuter, Sherman 
B. CTS CH-610B Intertestamental Literature 

Lacocque TTh 9:30-10:50 a.m. 



OLD TESTAMENT WORLD 

A. MTS B-471 The Archaeology of Palestine and the Bible 
Campbell T 2:00 - 4:50 p.m. 

B. LSTC B-601 Graduate Biblical Seminar 
Fuerst M 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 



Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 

Fall 

Spring 
Spring 
Fall 
Fall 
Spring 
Winter 

Spring 
Winter 

Spring 
Winter 



VI. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

A. LSTC B-300 Hebrew I 

Michel MWF 8:00 - 8:50 a.m. 

B. NBTS B-311A Hebrew I 

TBA TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 

C. NBTS B-311B Hebrew II 

TBA TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 

D. NBTS B-311C Hebrew III 

TBA TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 

17 



Winter 

Fall 

Winter 

Spring 



New Testament 



E. MTS B-312/322 Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I, II 
Schmitt MTWTHF 9:00 - 11:00 a.m. 



Boling 



Sec. I: MTWTh 8:00 -8:50 a.m. 
Sec. II: MTWTh 9:00 - 9:50 a.m. 



(Aug. 31 



Summer 

Sept. 20) 

Fall 



BIBLICAL STUDIES: 
NEW TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY COURSES 

A. General 

1. CTU B-305A, B, C New Testament Introduction 
Senior Sec. A : MW 12 : 00 noon - 1 : 15 p.m. 
Osiek Sec. B: MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 
LaVerdiere Sec. C: T 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

2. BTS B-330 Introduction to the New Testament 
Horning TTh 8:00-9:20 a.m. 

3. NBTS B-331 The Synoptic Gospels 

Guelich WF 10:40 a.m. - 12:00 noon 

B. Gospels 

1. MTS B-302 Jesus 

Hilgert Sec. I: TTh 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

Sec. II: T 7:00 -9:50 p.m. 

2. CTS CH-321 Synoptic Gospels 

Scroggs MW 2:00 -3:30 p.m. 

3. LSTC B-331 Gospel Tradition 

Norquist MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

Voobus TF 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. 

4. DIT B-450 Synoptic Gospels 

VanLinden MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 

5. DIT B-502 Parable and Miracle Traditions in the Gospel 
VanLinden M 

C. Paul 

1. LSTC B-332 Pauline Tradition 

Linss, Norquist MWF 8:00 - 8:50 a.m. 

2. NBTS B-332 The Meaning of Paul for Today 
Guelich WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. 

BOOK OF THE NEW TESTAMENT 

A. CTU B-430 The Gospel According to Matthew 
Senior M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

B. NBTS B-433 Exegesis in Mark 
Guelich TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. 

C. CTU B-435 The Gospel According to Luke 
Karris TTh 12:00 noon - 1:15 p.m. 



II. 



Winter 
Winter 
Winter 

Spring 

Winter 

Winter 

Winter 

Winter 
Winter 

Winter 

Spring 

Spring 
Spring 

Spring 
Fall 
Fall 



18 



New Testament 



D. John 

1. MTS B-401 The Gospel of John 

Hilgert MW 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

2. CTU B-440 The Gospel According to John 
Senior MW 1 : 30 - 2:45 p.m. 
Karris MW 1 :30 - 2 : 45 p.m. 

3. DIT B-451 Johannine Literature 

VanLinden MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 

E. CTS CH-426 The Book of Acts as a Theological Classic 
Scroggs TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. 

F. Letters of Paul 

1. MTS B-313 Paul 

Collins MW 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

2. MTS B-404 Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians 
Reeves MW 2:00 - 3:50 p.m. 

3. DIT B-415 Selected Pauline Epistles 

Fischer, VanLinden MWF 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. 

4. CTS CH-521 1 Corinthians 

Scroggs TTh 11 :00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. 

5. BTS B-531 Romans 

Snyder, Meyer TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 20 

6. DIT B-531 The Letter to the Hebrews and The Pastorals 
VanLinden M 

G. Other New Testament Books 

1. NBTS B-439 The Revelation of John 

Guelich TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 

2. LSTC B-448 Hebrews Through Revelation 
Linss MW 1:00 -2:15 p.m. 



Fall 

Fall 
Spring 

Spring 
Fall 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall 

Winter 
Winter 



III. NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY 

A. General 

1. BTS B-332 New Testament Theology 

Snyder TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Winter 

2. CTS CH-322 Beginnings of Christian Theology 

Scroggs TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Spring 

3. LSTC B-400 New Testament Theology 

Linss MW 1:00 -2 :15 p.m. Spring 

4. NBTS B-431 New Testament Theology 

Guelich WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Fall 

5. CTS CH-522 Theologies of the Resurrection and Death of Jesus in the 

New Testament 
Scroggs W 6:30 -9:30 p.m. Fall 

B. CTU B-452 Pauline Theology and Writings 

Karris TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Fall 

MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. Spring 



Themes 

1. LSTC B-442 Resurrection in The New Testament 
Norquist TF 1:00 - 2:15 p.m. 

19 



Spring 



New Testament 

2. MTS B-422 Sacramental Thought and Experience in the New 

Testament 
Collins W 2:00 -4 :50 p.m. Spring 

3. DIT B-555 Eucharist in New Testament 

VanLinden W Winter 

4. CTU B-576 The Ministry of Women in the Early Church 

Osiek MW 3:00 -4:15 p.m. Winter 

5. DIT B-590 Special Topics 

Staff TBA Upon Request 

6. CTU B-592 The Eucharist in the New Testament 

LaVerdiere TTh 1 : 30 - 2 : 45 p.m. Winter 

7. CTS CH-615 The Social World of the First Believers in Jesus 
Scroggs TBAr Spring 

IV. NEW TESTAMENT ETHICS 

1. LSTC B-450 Studies in New Testament Ethics 
CmCClld Norquist TF 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. Spring 

B. BTS B-455 Biblical Ethics 

Meyer TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Spring 

C. NBTS B-530 Sermon on the Mount 

Guelich, Snyder TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Spring 

D. DIT B-541 The Bible and Ethics 

Fischer T Fall 

V. EXEGESIS AND METHODOLOGY 

A. BTS B-438 Biblical Seminar: Parables and the Language of Faith 

Meyer WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Fall 

B. LSTC B-537 Parables of Jesus 

Voobus TF 1:00 -2:15 p.m. Fall 

C. LSTC B-544 Exegesis of Selected Texts in Acts 

Linss MW 2:30 -3:45 p.m. Fall 

D. CTU B-599 M.A. Seminar 

Hoppe W 7:00 -9:30 p.m. Spring 

VI. NEW TESTAMENT WORLD 

A. MTS B-315 History of New Testament Times II: From the Death of Jesus 
to the Beginning of Gnosticism (200 C.E.) 
Reeves TTh 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. Winter 

B. MTS B-420 Jewish Apocalypticism 

' Collins F 9:00 -11:50 a.m. Spring 

C. CTU B-518 Intertestamental Literature 

Hoppe TTh 1 : 30 - 2 : 45 p . m . Spring 

D. CTU B-526 Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

Perelmuter TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Fall 



20 



Historical Studies 



New Testament 



VII.NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

A. LSTC B-200 New Testament Greek 

Linss, Staff MWF 8:00 - 8:50 a.m. 

B. LSTC B-309A, B Greek Readings 

Linss MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

MWF 9:00 -9:50 a.m. 

C. BTS B-316A, B, C Elements of New Testament Greek I, II, III 
Barton TWF 1 : 10 - 2 : 00 p.m. 

TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 
TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 

D. NBTS B-316A, B, C Elements of New Testament Greek I, II, III 
Barton TWF 1:10 - 2:00 p.m. 

TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 
TWF 1:10 -2:00 p.m. 

E. MTS B-324/325 Introduction to New Testament Greek I & II 
Reeves Sec. I: MTWTh 8:00 - 8:50 a.m. 

Sec. II: MTWTh 9:00 -9:50 a.m. 
Sec. I: MTWTh 8:00 -8:50 a.m. 
Sec. II: MTWTh 9:00 -9:50 a.m. 

F. MTS B-421 Intermediate New Testament Greek 
Reeves TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 50 a.m. 



Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 



Spring 



Christian Doctrine 




Rigdon MW 2:00 - 3:50 p.m. 


Fall 


MW 7:00 -9:50 p.m. 


Winter 


BTS H-346 History of Christianity I 




Wagner MTTh 2 : 10 - 3 : 00 p.m. 


Fall 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 

INTRODUCTORY 

A. General 

1. MTS H-319/320 The Growth of the Christian Tradition: A History of 



2. 



3. MTS H/T 322 Christian Thought in the West from the Enlightenment 
to the Present 
Mudge TTh 10 : 00 - 11 : 50 a.m. Spring 

B. Ancient and Medieval 

1. CTU H-300A, B Early Christianity 

Young Sec. A.: MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. Winter 

Sec. B.: MW 1:30 -2:45 p.m. Winter 

2. CTU H-302 Early Expansion of Christianity 

Nemer MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. Fall 

3. CTU H-307 Christianization of Europe 

Young MW 3 : 00 - 4 : 15 p.m. Spring 



21 



Historical Studies 

4. DIT H-307 History of the Church to 700 A.D. 

Groves MW 8:10 - 9:00 a.m. Fall 

5. DIT H-309 History of the Church from 700 to 1500 A.D. 

Groves MWF 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. Winter 

6. CTU H-310 Christian Reformation and Counter-Reformation History 
Nemer MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. Spring 

7. LSTC H-310A Ancient and Medieval Church History 

Staff TTh 11:00 a.m. -12:15 p.m. Spring 

8. CTS CH-341 Christian Church in the World: Early Church 
Manschreck MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Fall 

9. NBTS C-341 Early and Medieval Christianity 

Ohlmann WF 10 : 40 a . m . - 12 : 00 noon Spring 

10. CTS CH-342 Christianity in the World: History of Christian People II 
Manschreck MW 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Winter 

C. Reformation and Modern 

1. DIT H-310 History of the Church from 1500 to the Present 

Groves MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. Winter 

2. LSTC H-330A, B Reformation and Modern Church History 

Fischer MWF 9:00 - 9:50 a.m. Fall 

MWF 9:00 - 9:50 a.m. Winter 

3. BTS H-340 The Believers' Church 

Durnbaugh TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Fall 

4. NBTS C-342 Reformation and Modern Christianity 

Ohlmann TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Fall 

5. BTS H-347 History of Christianity II 

Durnbaugh TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 20 Winter 

6. MTS H-438 British Theology in the Age of Reason 

Schafer F 9:00 - 11:50 a.m. Fall 

7. BTS H-440 The Radical Reformation 

Durnbaugh T 7:00 - 9:45 p.m. Winter 

8. CTS CH-462 The Left Wing of the Reformation 

Manschreck TTh 11:20 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Winter 

D. American 

1 . LSTC H-350A American Church History 

Scherer MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m. Spring 

2. LSTC H-350B American Lutheran Church History 

Fischer MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m. Spring 

3. DIT H-413 History of the American Catholic Church 

Groves MWF 8 : 10 - 9 : 00 Spring 

4. MTS H-442 Liberal Theology in America Since the Civil War 
Schafer F 9:00 - 11:50 a.m. Winter 

II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

A. NBTS 1-302 Denominational Orientation 

TBA T 2:10 -4:45 p.m. Spring 

B. MTS H-312 Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

Gonzalez TBA Fall 



22 



D. 



H. 



K. 



Historical Studies 

BTS H-343 History of the Church of the Brethren 

Durnbaugh WF 8 : 00 - 9 : 20 Spring 

LSTC H-360 Lutheran Heritage 

Pero MW 1:00 -2:15 p.m. Spring 

Scherer MW 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. Fall 

M/L H-394 Unitarian Universalist History 

Godbey TBA Winter 

MTS H-406 The American Presbyterian and Reformed Churches 

Schafer TTh 10:00- 11:50 a.m. Fall 

MTS H-430 Seminar on Eastern Orthodox Christianity 

Rigdon TBA Spring 

MTS H-431 Traveling Seminar : Poland 

Rigdon TBA Spring 

BTS H-445 The Intentional Community 

Durnbaugh T 7 : 00 - 9 : 45 p . m . Spring 

NBTS C-447 Baptist Thought 

Ohlmann TTh 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Winter 

CTU H-493 History of Christian Spirituality: Modern and Contemporary 
Lozano TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Spring 

L. LSTC H-561 Lutheran Unity 

Fischer, Tobias WF 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Winter 

III. HISTORY-INDIVIDUALS 

A. MTS H-401 Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

Rigdon T 2:00 -4:50 p.m. Winter 

B. LSTC H-435 Theology of Luther 

Fischer MWF 11 : 00 - 11 : 50 a.m. Fall 

C. CTS CH-491 Contrasting Philosophies of History 

Manschreck T 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Fall 

D. LSTC H-610 Luther on Repentance and Grace 

Fischer MW 1:00 - 2:15 p.m. Spring 

IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 

A. NBTS M-369 History II: Black Congregations and Denominations 

Blanf ord M 7 : 00 - 9 : 30 p . m . Spring 

B. CTU H-415 Our American Catholic Heritage: 1776-1918 

Nemer M W 12 : 00 noon -1:15p.m. Fall 

C. CTU H-416 American Catholic Experience: 1918 to Present 

Ross W 7:00 -9:30 p.m. Spring 

D. NBTS C-445 Christianity and Culture in America: An Historical 

Perspective 
Ohlmann WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Winter 



23 



Historical Studies Theological Studies 

E. NBTS C-548 Perspectives on Evangelicalism 

Dayton, Wells Th 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. Winter 

V. SELECTED TOPICS 

A. CTU H-325 Models of Missionary Activity in the Church's History 
Nemer MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. Winter 

B. BTS H-349 Research Methods in Church History 

Durnbaugh T 3 : 10 - 5 : 55 p.m. Fall 

C. CTU H-422 19th Century Europe and World Mission 

Nemer MW 10 : 30 - 11 : 45 a.m. Winter 

D. CTU H-426 The Growth of the Church in Asia and the South Pacific 
Nemer MW 1 : 30 - 2 : 45 p.m. Spring 

E. CTU H-430 Vatican II: Problem or Solution? 

Ross W 7 : 00 - 9 : 30 p.m. Winter 

F. LSTC H-455 Church and Mission in Contemporary Africa 

Scherer TF 1:00 - 2:15 p.m. Winter 

G. CTS CH-493 An Inquiry into Contemporary Judaism: The Holocaust: 

Roots and Response 
Manschreck M 6 : 30 - 9 : 30 p . m . Spring 

H. CTS CH-565 An Inquiry into Nihilism 

Manschreck MW 11 : 00 a.m. - 12 : 20 p.m. Spring 



THEOLOGICAL STUDIES 

INTRODUCTORY AND FOUNDATIONAL 

A. Introductory 

1. DIT T-300 Revelation and the Response in Faith 

Staff MWF 10:10 -11:00 a.m. Fall 

2. MTS T-301 Introduction to Theology: Theological Reflection 
Parker TTh 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. Fall 

3. CTS TEC-304 Constructive Theology I 

LeFe vre M W 3 : 40 - 5 : 00 p . m . Spring 

4. LSTC T-310 Introduction to Theology 

Sherman TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Fall 

5. LSTC T-310C Introduction to Theology (Introduction a la Teologia) 
Navarro TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Fall 

6. CTU T-325 A, B Introduction to Theology 

Hayes Sec. A: MW 12:00 noon -1:15 p.m. Fall 

Schineller Sec. B : MW 10 : 30 - 11 : 45 a.m. Fall 

Linnan MW 12 : 00 noon - 1 : 15 p.m. Winter 

7. NBTS C-350 Philosophical Ideas Which Have Shaped Theology: 

An Introduction 
Piippo M 7:00 -9:30 p.m. Spring 



24 



Theological Studies 

B. Foundational 

1. DIT T-302 Theological Anthropology 

Minogue MWF 8 : 10 - 9 : 00 Winter 

2. CTS TEC-305 Constructive Theology II 

LeFevre TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Fall 

3. LSTC T-311 Christian Theology I 

Braaten MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m. Fall 

Hefner TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. 

4. LSTC T-312 Christian Theology II 

Braaten MWF 11:00 - 11:50 a.m. Winter 

Hefner TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Winter 

5. NBTS C-353 Christian Theology: Issues and Approaches 

Finger TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 20 a.m. Fall 

6. NBTS C-354 Christian Theology: An Eschatalogical Approach 
Finger TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Winter 

7. NBTS C-355 Christian Theology: Christian Life, Community, and 

God 
Finger TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Spring 

8. MTS T-413 Theology for Ministry 

Burkhart MW 2 : 00 - 3 : 50 p.m. Winter 

II. PARTICULAR TRADITIONS OF THEOLOGICAL CONSTRUCTION AND 
THEOLOGICAL METHOD 

A. MTS T-315 Hispanic-American Cultural Resources for Theological 

Reflection 
Armendariz M 2:00 - 4:50 p.m. Winter 

B. MTS T— 322 Christian Thought in the West from the Enlightenment to 

the Present 
Mudge TTh 10:00 -11:50 a.m. Spring 

C. NBTS C-351H Introduction to Theology: An Approach from the 

Underside of History 
Mottesi T 6 : 00 - 9 : 00 p.m. Spring 

D. CTS TEC-361 Dynamics of the Sacred 

Moore TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Fall 

E. CTS CH-367 History and Polity of the United Church of Christ 

Rooks, Bacon T 2 : 00 - 5 : 00 p . m . Spring 

F. CTS CH-390 An Inquiry into Methodism 

Moore, Manschreck, Blackwell Th 6 : 30 - 9 : 30 p.m. Winter 

G. M/L TS-395 Liberal Theology and Mythos 

Engel, Reeves TBA Spring 

H. MTS T-414 Studies in Reformed Theology 

Burkhart M 6:00 - 9:00 p.m. Spring 

I. LSTC T-430 Black Theology and the Black Church 

Pero M 7:00 -10:00 p.m. Winter 

J. M/L TS-438 Process Theology 

Reeves/Engel TBA Winter 

25 



Theological Studies 



K. NBTS C-454 Recent Theological Thought 

Finger WF 2:10 - 3:30 p.m. 

L. LSTC T-456 Liberation Theology 

Pero MW 2:30 -3:45 p.m. 

M. NBTS M-468 Black Churches and Black Theologies 
Blanford M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

N. CTS CM-523 Seminar in Practical Theology 
Cancel^ Seymour, Moore T 6 : 30 - 9 : 30 p .m . 

O. NBTS C-548 Perspectives on Evangelicalism 
Dayton, Wells Th 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 

Seepp?- CTS TEC-452, 453 
140-/4/ Fukuyama 

III. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR INDIVIDUALS 

A. MTS T-419 The Theology of Schleiermacher 
Parker F 9:00 - 11:50 a.m. 



B. 



C 



MTS T-422 Studies in the Theology of Paul Tillich 
Burkhart F 9:00 - 11:50 a.m. 



LSTC T-434 The Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 
Pero T 2:30 -5:00 p.m. 

D. NBTS C-446 Reconsidering the Social Gospel 
Finger T 2:10 - 4:45 p.m. 

E. BTS T-451 The Theology of H. Richard Niebuhr 
Meyer WF 10:40 a.m. - 12:00 noon 

F. BTS T-452 Theology of Karl Barth 

Groff W 2:10 -4:55 p.m. 

G. CTU T-493 The Experience of God in Teresa of Avila and 
Lozano TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

H. CTU T-494 The Spiritual Theology of Karl Rahner 
Szura TTh 12:00 noon - 1:15 p.m. 

I. NBTS C-555 Seminar in the Theology of Karl Barth 
Dayton M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

J. LSTC T-631 Three Metaphysical Systems for Theology 
Hefner M 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 

IV. MAJOR TOPICS IN THEOLOGY 

A. CTU T-540 Theology of the Trinity 

Hayes MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. 

B. Christology 

1. MTS T-404 Doctrine of Christ 

Parker TTh 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

2. DIT T-422 Christology 

Staff MW 1:00 -2:30 p.m. 



Fall 
Winter 

Fall 
Spring 

Winter 

Fall 
Winter 

Fall 
Spring 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 

Fall 

John of the Cross 
Winter 

Fall 

Winter 

Fall 

Fall 

Winter 
Fall 



26 



Theological Studies 



3. DIT T-423 Man in Christ 

Minogue MW 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. 

4. CTU 1-439 Christology 

Hayes, Senior MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

MW 9:00 -10:15 a.m. 

5. CTU T-441 Christology and Cultures 
Schreiter TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

6. LSTC T-458 Hispanic American Christologies 
Navarro MW2:30 - 3:45 p.m. 

7. DIT T-522 Problems in Christology 
Minogue T 

8. CTU T-541 Contemporary Christologies 
Hayes ^ MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. 

C. Salvation 

1. NBTS C-456 Salvation 

Finger W 2:10 - 4:45 p.m. 

2. LSTC T-552 Doctrines of Justification and Sanctification 
Braaten MW 2:30 - 3:45 p.m. 

D. Eschatology 

1. CTU T-435 Origins and Eschatology 

Hayes MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

2. CTU T-436 Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 
Schreiter TTh 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

3. DIT T-533 Eschatology 

Minogue M 

4. LSTC T-543 The Kingdom of God and Life Everlasting 
Braaten MW2:30 - 3:45 p.m. 

E. Ecclesiology 

1 . DIT T-403 Ecclesiology 

Staff MWF 9:10 -10:00 a.m. 

2. DIT T-404 Ecumenism 

Staff TBA 

3. CTU T-445 Theology of the Church 
Linnan MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. 

4. CTU T-446 The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 
Schineller TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

5. MTS T-415 The Ecumenical Vision 
Mudge T 2:00 -4:50 p.m. 

F. Sacraments 

1. MTS T-402 Baptism and Eucharist 
Burkhart TTh 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

2 . CTU T-450 Theology of the Eucharist 
Ostdiek MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 
Keifer TTh 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

G. Other 

1. MTS T-333 Doctrines in Transition: Men, Women, 
Parker, Jarvis T 2:00 - 4:50 p.m. 



Winter 

Fall 
Winter 

Winter 

Winter 

Spring 

Spring 

Spring 
Winter 

Spring 

Spring 

Fall 

Spring 

Winter 
Winter 
Winter 

Spring 
Fall 

Fall 

Fall 
Winter 



and Theology 

Winter 



27 



Theological Studies 



2 . DIT T-590 Selected Topics 

Staff TBA Upon Request 

V. CHRISTIANITY AND THE WORLD 

A. Christianity, Church and Culture 

1. M/L TS-381 Biblical and Democratic Traditions 

Engel TBA Winter 

2. CTU T-430 The Problem of God and Contemporary Society 

Linnan MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. Fall 

Hayes MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Winter 

3. CTS TEC-500 Interpretation 

LeFevre W 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Fall 

4. LSTC T-570 Christian Faith in a Scientific Age 

Hefner T 2:30 - 5:00 p.m. Winter 

B. Theology of Ministerial Identity and Vocation 

1. M/L TS-361 Women and Religion: Theological Reflection 

Arthur Th 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

2. LSTC T-450 Senior Seminar I: Theology and the Church's Ministry 
Braaten TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Fall 



CCTS T-472 Communicating the Religious Message in an Age of 
Science 



4. 



5. 



Burhoe, Hefner TBA 

LSTC T-545 Ministerial Identity and Apostolic Continuity 

Tobias TTh 8:30-9:45 a.m. 



Fall 



CCTS T-572 Advanced Seminar in Theology and the Sciences 
Burhoe, Hefner TBA 



Spring 
Fall 



VI. SPIRITUALITY AND SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

A. CTU T-301 Structures of Religious Experience: The Great Traditions 



B. 



F. 



G. 



Schreiter 



MW 9:00 -10:15 a.m. 



DIT T-301 Horizons of Spirituality 
Staff TWF 10:10 



Fall 



Fall 



11:00 a.m. 

C. NBTS C-352 Prayer and Theology 

Piippo M 7:00 -9:30 p.m. Fall 

D. CTU M-412 Theology and Practice of Prayer 

Lozano TTh 12:00 noon - 1:15 p.m. Spring 

E. CTU T-496 East- West Spiritualities: From Challenge to Integration 

Spae M 3:00 -5:30 p.m. Spring (4/12 - 5/12) 

NBTS C-546 The Christian Life 

Ohlmann M 1:10 - 3:40 p.m. Fall 

DIT M-580 Spiritual Direction 

VanLinden TBA Spring 



28 



Ethical Studies 

ETHICAL STUDIES 

INTRODUCTORY 

A. LSTC E-310A Christian Ethics 

Benne MW 2:30 - 3:45 p.m. Fall 

B. LSTC E-310B Christian Ethics: Theology and Ethics of H. Richard Niebuhr 
Benne, Norquist MW 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. Winter 

C. MTS E-313 Introduction to Christian Ethics 

Garria MW 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. Fall 

D. CTS TEC-321 Christian Ethics 

Schr oeder M W 2: 00 -3:20p.m. Spring 

E. BTS E-351 Christian Faith and Ethics 

Groff /Miller WF 2:10 - 3:30 p.m. Spring 

F. M/L E-431 Religious Ethics: James Luther Adams 

Engel TBAr Fall 

G. BTS E-565 The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

Miller T 3 : 10 - 5 : 55 p.m. Winter 



II. THE BIBLE, THE CHURCH AND ETHICS 

A. LSTC B-450 Studies in New Testament Ethics 
Cancelled Norquist TF 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. 

B. BTS B-455 Biblical Ethics 

Meyer TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. 

C. NBTS B-530 Sermon on the Mount 
Guelich/Snyder TTh 11 : 00 - 12 : 15 p.m. 

D. DIT B-541 The Bible and Ethics 
Fischer T 



Spring 

Spring 

Spring 

Fall 



HI. MORAL THEOLOGY 

A. DIT E-341 Principles of Christian Morality 
Minogue MWF 8 : 10 - 9 : 00 a.m. 

B. CTU E-370 Christian Ethics : Invitation and Response 
Diesbourg MW 9 : 00 - 10 : 15 a .m . 

C. CTU E-379 Christian Ethics: The Moral Agent 
Nairn MW 3:00 - 4: 15 p.m. 
Nairn MW 12:00-1:15 p.m. 

D. DIT E-531 St. Thomas on Human Acts 
Minogue W 

E. DIT E-532 St. Thomas on Virtue and Sin 
Minogue W 

F. CTU E-536 Ambiguity in Moral Decision Making 
Nairn TTh 1:30- 2:45 p.m. 

G. DIT E-541 Method in Ethics 
Minogue TH 

29 



Spring 

Winter 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall 



Ethical Studies 



H. DIT E-545 Freedom and Responsibility 
Minogue T 

I. CTU E-588 The Mystery of Christ and Moral Structures 
Fornasari MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

IV. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL ETHICS 

A. CTU E-374 On Being A Christian in the World 
Fornasari MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

B. CTU E-375 Theological Foundations of Social Ethics 
Nairn MW 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

C. M/L E-392 Environmental Ethics 
Engel TBAr 

D. MTS E-416 Peace as a Christian Moral Concern 
Garcia T 7:00 - 9:50 p.m. (Center) 

E. MTS E-439 Social Ethics in the Hispanic American Context: 

North and South 
Garcfa F 9:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

F. DIT E-443 Social Justice 

Minogue MWF 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. 

G. NBTS C-458 Moral Issues and Christian Response 
Blanford TTh 9:30-10:50 a.m. 

H. CTU E-488 Marxist Humanism and Christian Faith 
Fornasari MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 

I. CTU E-409 Ethical Issues in the War/Peace Debate 
Pawlikowski TTh 1 : 30 - 2 : 45 p.m. 

J. CTU E-540 Social Ethics and American Catholicism 
Pawlikowski TTh 10 : 30 - 11 : 45 a.m. 

K. NBTS C-558 Social Ethics 

Mottesi WF 10 : 40 - 12 : 00 noon 

L. CTU E-570 Theology of Revolution 

Pawlikowski MW 1 : 30 - 2 : 45 p.m. 

M. CTU E-590 Contemporary Social Problems 

Pawlikowski TTh 10 : 30 - 11 : 45 a.m. 

V. SEXUALITY 

A. LSTC E-430 Christian Sexual Ethics in Cross-Cultural Perspective 
Bjornsson/Benne T 2:30 - 5:00 p.m. 

B. CTU E-580 Theology and Ethics of Christian Marriage 



Diesbourg 



MW 10:30 -11:45 a.m. 



VI. SELECTED TOPICS IN ETHICS 

A. MTS E-318 Ethics II Moral Problems 



Garcia 



MW 2:00 -3:50 p.m. 



Spring 
Fall 

Spring 
Winter 
Spring 
Spring 

Winter 

Spring 

Winter 

Winter 

Spring 

Winter 

Fall 

Fall 

Fall 

Fall 
Spring 

Winter 



30 



Ethical Studies 



World Mission Studies 



B. LSTC E-432 Seminar in Business Ethics 
Benne T 2:30 - 5:00 p.m. 

C. MTS E-433 Seminar in Ethics 

Stotts T 2:00 -4:50 p.m. 

D. CTU E-482 Medical Ethics 

Nairn MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. 

E. LSTC E-510 Basic Issues in Biomedical Ethics 
Sherman M 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 

F. DIT E-535 Marriage and Divorce 
Minogue M 

G. DIT E-546 Medical Ethics 
Minogue T 

H. DIT E-590 Directed Reading on Selected Topics 
Minogue TBAr 

I. M/L TS-381 Biblical and Democratic Traditions 
Engel TBAr 



Winter 
Fall 

Winter 
Fall 

Winter 

Winter 
Upon Request 

Winter 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

THEOLOGY, FOUNDATIONS AND DYNAMICS OF MISSION 

A. CTU T-446 The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 



B. 



D. 



Schineller TTh 9 : 00 - 10 : 15 a.m. Spring 

CTU W-446 Initiatory Rites and Christian Initiation 

Barbour M 7 : 00 - 9 : 30 p .m . Spring 

CTU W-535 Development of the Christian Community 

Boberg TTh 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. Winter 

CTU W-538 Basic Christian Communities, Justice and Global Solidarity 

Barbour W 7 : 00 - 9 : 30 p . m . Spring 



E. CCTS 1-560 Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive 



(1 or 3 full courses) 

Barbour/Boberg MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Sept. 28 - Oct. 21 
(plus some week-end experiences) 



Fall 



II. MISSION IN PARTICULAR SITUATIONS 

A. LSTC W-310 World Mission and Evangelization: History, Theology 

and Practice 
Scherer TF 1 : 00 - 2 : 15 p.m. Fall 

B. NBTS M-375 Missiology 

Bakke TTh 11 : 00 - 12 : 15 Winter 

C. LSTC W-426 World Religions 

Lindberg T 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. Fall 



31 



Ministry Studies 

D. LSTC W-428 Understanding Islam 

Scherer MW 2:30 - 3:45 p.m. Spring 

E. MTS W-454 The Church and Economic Issues 

Poethig T 2:00 -4:50 p.m. Spring 

F. LSTC W-511,The Kingdom of God and the Unreached: 

Missiological Issues in the Eighties 
Scherer T 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. Winter 

G. CTU W-592 Lakota Belief, Ritual and Spirituality 

Barbour T 7 : 00 - 9 : 30 p . m . Winter 

III. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MISSION 

A. MTS M-427 Hispanic Ministry Travel Seminar 

Armendariz TBA Winter 

B. CTU W-430 Cultural Orientation 

Staff TBAr Fall 

C. CTU B-490 Biblical Foundations of Mission 

Bergant/Senior MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Spring 

D. CTU W-497 Mission Integration Seminar 

Barbour/Staff Th 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Fall 

Barbour/Staff Th 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Winter 

E. CTU W-530 Research Seminar in Area Studies 

Boberg/Staff TBAr Winter 

F. CTU W-545 Cultural Anthropology 

Staff TBAr Spring 



MINISTRY: ITS NATURE AND PRACTICE 

THE NATURE OF MINISTRY 

A. CTS CM-300 The Practice of Christian Ministry 

Moore MW 3:40 - 5:00 p.m. Fall 

B. NBTS M-360 Church and Society 

Mottesi M 1:10 - 3:40 p.m. Spring 

C. NBTS M-362 Introduction to Urban Ministry 

Bakke WF 2:10 - 3:30 p.m. Fall 

D. BTS M-370 Theology and Ministry 

Poling/Miller TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Winter 

E. MTS M-400 Religion and the Social Sciences 

Garcia F 9 : 00 - 11 : 50 a.m. Spring 

F. CTU M-413 Jesus of Nazareth. A Look at His Spirituality 

Lozano TTh 12 : 00 - 1 : 15 p.m. Winter 

G. CTS CM-431 Minister as Spiritual Director 

Moore W 9 : 30 - 12 : 20 p .m . Winter 

32 



Ministry Studies 

H. CTS CM-523 Seminar in Practical Theology 
Cancelled Seymour/Moore T 6:30 -9:30 Spring 

I. NBTS M-570 Readings in the Theology and Practice of Ministry 

Bakke Th 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

J. DIT M-580 Spiritual Direction 

VanLinden TBAr Spring 

K. CTU M-592 Religious Values in Effective Personal Leadership 

Spilly TBAr Winter 

- L. CTS CM-315, 340, 421 
0-141 E - Morrison Winter /Fall /Spring 

II. MINISTRY, CHURCH AND SOCIETY 

A. Ministry and the Community 

1. MTS M-301 The Contexts of Ministry 

Armendariz/ Staff F 2:00 - 3:30 p.m. Fall, Winter, Spring 

2. NBTS C-359 Sociology of Religion 

Mottesi WF 10 : 40 - 12 : 00 noon Winter 

3. NBTS C-359H Sociology of Religion: An Hispanic Perspective 
Mottesi T 6:00 -9:00 p.m. Winter 

4. LSTC M-370 Ministry in Church and Society (Teaching Parish) 
Benne TTh 11:00 - 12:15 p.m. Spring 

5. LSTC M-415 Ministry in Hispanic Communities 

Navarro MW 2 : 30 - 3 : 45 p . m . Spring 

6. NBTS C-445 Christianity and Culture in America: 

An Historical Perspective 
Ohlmann WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Winter 

7. NBTS C-459H Sociology of Religion in the Hispanic Community 
TBA Th 6:00 -9:00 p.m. Spring 

8. NBTS M-462 Contemporary Urban Strategies: A Seminar in the City 
Bakke M 1:10 - 3:40 p.m. Spring 

9. NBTS M-464 Ministry in Lombard: A Seminar in Community 

Exegesis and Ministry Design 
Bakke M 1:10 - 3:40 p.m. Winter 

10. BTS M-494 The Church in the 80s 

Groff/Neff W 7:00 - 9:45 p.m. Winter 

11. CTU M-496 Approved Summer Ministries 

Szura/ Staff TBAr Spring 

§ ee pp. 12. NBTS M-486 Ministry with Adults 
140-H1 Morris TBAr Fall 

B. Evangelism 

1. NBTS M-3 77 The Theology and Practice of Evangelism 

Bakke TTh 11:00 - 12:15 Spring 

2. NBTS M-378C Contemporary Evangelism Strategies 

Bakke Feb. 21-23 Winter 



33 



Ministry Studies Pastoral Care 

III. CHURCH ORGANIZATION, ADMINISTRATION AND GROWTH 

A. Organizing and Administering a Congregation 

1. MTS M-317 Community Organization As A Church Concern 
Morales TBA Fall 

2. NBTS M-372 Church Administration 

Goddard Th 2:30 - 5:00 p.m. Winter 

3. CTU M-425 Church Stewardship (2) 

Hill W 7:00 -9:00 p.m. Spring 

4. CTU M-431 Values, Policy and the American Parish Community 
Kelly TTh 12:00 -1:15 p.m. Fall 

B. Church Growth 

1. NBTS M-379 Stimulating Church Growth In A Local Congregation— 

A Basic Seminar 
Nelson June 8-12 Summer 

2. NBTS M-575 Stimulating Discipleship In A Local Congregation — 

An Advanced Seminar 
Duncan Mcintosh June 15-19 Summer 

C. Church Polity 

1. MTS M-307 Preparing for Ministry 

Worley M 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

2. CTS CH-367 History and Polity of the United Church of Christ 
Rooks/Bacon T 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. Spring 

3. CTS CH-390 An Inquiry Into Methodism 
Manschreck/Blackwell /Moore Th 6 : 30 - 9 : 30 Winter 

- 4. CTS CM-408, 410, 455 
^tit T.Morrison Fall /Spring/ Winter 



PASTORAL CARE 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

A. MTS M-310 Introduction to Pastoral Care 

Ashby M 7:00 -9:50 p.m. Winter 

B. LSTC M-320A, B Ministry in Pastoral Care (Teaching Parish) 
Anderson, Swanson TTh 8 : 30 - 9 : 45 a.m. Spring 

C. CTS CM-330 Personal Transformation 

Moore MW 2:00 - 3:20 p.m. Spring 

D. DIT M-365 Perspectives in Pastoral Care 

Ulrich, Staff MWF 8:10-9:00 a.m. Fall 

E. CTU M-497 Pastoral Internship 

Szura TBAr Spring 

II. PASTORAL COUNSELING 

A. General Concepts 

1. CTU M-300 Symbol, Image and Feeling in Religious Development 

Arnold T 1:30 - 4:00 p.m. Fall 

34 



Pastoral Care 

2. BTS M-380 Faith Community as Healer 

Poling TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. Spring 

3. NBTS M-394 Theories of Personality and Counseling 

Taylor WF 2:10 - 3:30 p.m. Spring 

4. NBTS M-395 Fundamentals of Pastoral Counseling 

Taylor WF 2:10 - 3:30 p.m. Winter 

5. CTU M-403 Theological Topics in Humanistic Psychology 

Szura MW 1:30 -2:45 p.m. Spring 

6. CTU M-405 Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

Mallonee TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Fall 

MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Winter 

MW 9:00 -10:15 a.m. Spring 

7. CTU M-406 Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 
Mallonee MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Fall 

TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Spring 

8. MTS M-428 The Future of Pastoral Theology: 

Definition of a Discipline 
Way TBA Fall 

9. NBTS M-499 Theories of Counseling 

Taylor WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Spring 

10. CTU M-506 Advanced Seminar in Pastoral Counseling 

Mallonee TBAr Winter 

11. CTU M-510 Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

Szura TBAr Fall 

TBAr Winter 

TBAr Spring 

B. Group Counseling (pastoral) 

1. DIT M-471 Group Process in the Life of the Church 

Schultz TBAr Fall 

2. LSTC M-520 Group Dynamics and Group Therapy 

Swanson MW 8:00 - 9:30 a.m. Fall 

3. NBTS M-597 Group Counseling and Psychotherapy 

Taylor TTh 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. Fall 

C. Marriage and Family Counseling 

1. BTS M-487 Marriage and Family Counseling 

Poling TTh 8:00 -9:20 a.m. Fall 

2. NBTS M-494 Marriage and Family Counseling 

Taylor Th 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

3 . NBTS M-496 Marriage Enrichment 

Taylor T 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Winter 

4. LSTC M-521 Marriage and Family Counseling 

Swanson MW 8 : 00 - 9 : 30 Winter 

5. DIT M-560 Pastoral Care of the Family 

Staff TBA Fall 

6. DIT M-561 Pastoral Care of the Family 

Staff TBA Winter 

7. DIT M-562 Pastoral Care of the Family 

Staff TBA Spring 



35 



Pastoral Care 



III. SELECTED TOPICS IN PASTORAL CARE 

A. CTS TEC-361 Dynamics of the Sacred 
Moore TTh 11:00 a.m. - 



D. 



12:20 p.m. 

CTU M-402 Theological Topics in Jungian Thought 
Szura MW 12 : 00 noon -1:15 p.m. 

CTS CM-431 Minister as Spiritual Director 
Moore W 9:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. 

CTS CM-439 Aging and the Human Spirit 
LeFevre W 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. 

CTS CM-451 Gestalt Therapy and Religious Experience 
Anderson M 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. 

CTS CM-467 Adlerian Psychotherapy and Pastoral Counseling 
Moore Th 9:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m. 

CTU M-505 Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 
Mallonee TBAr 



H. | CCTS M-535 Psychology of Religion"! 1981-82 
Swanson 



F 9:00 a.m. -12: 00 noon 



I. 



K. 



DIT M-556 Pastoral Care of the Aged 
Ulrich TBA 

DIT M-557 Pastoral Care of the Aged 
Ulrich TBA 

DIT M-558 Pastoral Care of the Aged 
Ulrich TBA 



L. CTS TEC-561 Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 
Moore M 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. 

M. BTS M-582 Pastoral Care as Theology 

Poling WF 10:50 a.m. - 12:10 p.m. 



Fall 

Winter 
Winter 
Winter 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 
Winter 



Spring 



N. | CCTS M-593 Pastoral Care: Stress and Crisis Intervention [ 1982-83 



Swanson F 9 : 00 a.m. - 12 : 00 noon 

O. Practica in Various Ministries 



1. 



CCTS M-620A, B, C Practicum in Congregational Care 
Staff 



TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 



CCTS M-624A-F Practicum in Pastoral Psychotherapy 
Staff 



TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 



Spring 



Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A, D 
Winter B, E 
Spring C, F 



3. 



CCTS M-628A, B , C Practicum in Geriatric Pastoral Care 
Staff TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 



Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 



36 



Pastoral Care 



Liturgy and Worship 



CCTS M-630A, B, C Practicum in Drug Use and Abuse 
Staff TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 



CCTS M-634A, B, C Practicum in Religion a nd Med icine 
Staff TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 



Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 



CCTS M-636A, B, C Practicum in Community Mental Health | 
Staff TBAr Fall A 

TBAr Winter B 

TBAr Spring C 



7. 1 CCTS M-638A, B, C Practicum in Clinical Pastoral Education! 



Staff 



TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 



CCTS M-591 Pastoral Care: History and Theology 
Ashby F 9 : 00 - 12 : 00 noon 

Q. 1 CCTS M-592 Personality Theories and Therapies | 
Swanson F 9 : 00 - 12 : 00 noon 

LITURGY AND WORSHIP 

INTRODUCTORY 

A. MTS M-314 Understanding the Dynamics of Corporate Worship 
Wardlaw MW 10:00 - 11:50 

B. DIT M-330 Introduction to Liturgical Studies 
Arceneaux TTh 9 : 10 - 10 : 00 

C. CTU T-350 Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 
Ostdiek MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. 
Hughes Sec. A: MW 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. 
Keifer Sec. B: MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. 

D. LSTC M-380 Ministry in Worship (Teaching Parish) 
Staff TTh 11:00 -12:15 

E. NBTS M-388 Worship in the Church 
Goddard T 2:30 - 5:00 p.m. 



Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall 

Winter 



Spring 

Fall 

Fall 
Spring 
Spring 

Winter 

Spring 



II. LITURGICAL LEADERSHIP 

A. MTS M-416 Helping the People Engage in Corporate Worship 
Wardlaw MW 10:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

B. DIT M-431 Practicum in Presidential Style of Celebration I 
Arceneaux WF 10:10 - 11:00 a.m. 

C. DIT M-432 Practicum in Presidential Style of Celebration II 
VanLinden/ Arceneaux WF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 

D. MTS M-444 Worship and Liturgy in the Hispanic Congregation 
Armendariz W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m. 



Winter 
Spring 
Spring 
Spring 



37 



Liturgy and Worship 



E. CTU 1-490 Bible and Liturgy 

LaVerdiere TTh 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

F. NBTS M-493 Preaching and Worship in the Church 
Blanford WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. 



WF 10:10 -11:00 a.m. 



III. SACRAMENTS 

A. DIT M-462 The Eucharist 
Arceneaux 

B. Initiation 

1. DIT M-361 Sacraments of Initiation: Baptism, Confirmation 
Arceneaux MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 

2. CTU T-455 Initiation 

Keifer TTh 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. 

Ostdiek MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. 

C. Matrimony 

1. CTU M-420 Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 
Bogdan MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. 
Bogdan MW 3:00 - 4:15 p.m. 

2. DIT M-464 The Sacrament of Matrimony 

Prist MW 8:10 -9:00 a.m. 

3. DIT M-569 Pastoral Aspects of Matrimony 
Arceneaux W 

D. DIT M-463 Sacraments of Healing: Penance and Anointing of the 
Staff TTh 9:10 -10:00 a.m. 

E. Orders 

1. CTU 1-444 Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradition 
Linnan MW 12 : 00 - 1 : 15 p.m. 

2. DIT M-465 Orders: Mission and Ministry 
Arceneaux WF 9 : 10 - 10 : 00 a .m . 

IV. HISTORY OF LITURGY 

A. CTU M-461 Liturgy of the Synagogue: Pattern and Practice 
Perelmuter TTh 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. 

V. PRAYER 

A. DIT M-430 The Liturgy of Hours 

Arceneaux T 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. 

B. CTU M-516 Practicum: Leadership of Prayer 
Hughes W 7:00 -9:30 p.m. 

C. DIT M-534 Parochial Liturgical Celebrations 
Arceneaux M 

VI. MUSIC 

A. M/L M-365 Music in the Church 

Moore Th eve 



Spring 
Winter 

Winter 

Spring 

Fall 
Winter 

Fall 
Spring 

Fall 

Fall 

Sick 
Spring 

Spring 
Spring 

Fall 

Winter 
Winter 
Winter 

Winter 



38 



Liturgy and Worship Preaching and Communication 

VII.SELECTED TOPICS 

A. BTS M-475 The Facilitation of Worship 

Faus W 2:10 - 4:55 p.m. Spring 

B. CTU T-550 Area Studies in Worship: Great Books in Liturgy 

Staff TBAr Fall 

Staff TBAr Winter 

Staff TBAr Spring 

C. CTU M-562 Liturgy of the Synagogue: Advanced Seminar 

Perelmuter TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Spring 

D. DIT M-590 Directed Research 

Arceneaux TBAr Upon Request 



PREACHING AND COMMUNICATION 

FOUNDATIONAL COURSES 

A. DIT M-302 Ministry of Preaching 

Staff W 1:00 -1:50 p.m. Winter 

B. DIT M-303 Introduction to the Homily 

Staff Th 10:10-11: 00 Spring 

C. MTS M-315 Perspectives on Preaching 

Wardlaw/ Jarvis MW 10 : 00 - 11 : 50 Fall 

D. LSTC M-340 Ministry in Preaching (Teaching Parish) 

Niedenthal TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 45 a . m . Winter 

E. NBTS M-391 Introduction to Preaching 

Blanf ord T2:10-4:45p.m. Fall 

F. DIT M— 404 Practicum and Homily Critics 

Staff W 10 : 10 - 11 : 00 Spring 

G. CTU M-450A, B Preaching as Verbal Communication 
Hughes A, B Seminar M 12 : 00 - 1 : 00 p.m. 

A Lab M 3 : 00 - 5 : 00 p .m . 

B Lab W 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. Fall 

Hughes A, B Seminar M 12 : 00 - 1 : 00 p .m . 

A Lab M 3:00 -5:00 p.m. 

B Lab W 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. Winter 

Hughes A, B Seminar M 12 : 00 - 1 : 00 p . m . 

A Lab M 3 : 00 - 5 : 00 p.m. 

B Lab W 12:00 - 2:00 p.m. Spring 

AREA STUDIES IN PREACHING 

A. Communication 

1. DIT M-301 The Minister as Communicator 

Staff Th 9: 10 -10: 00 Spring 

2. MTS M-401 The Power of Language in the Community of Faith 
Jarvis MW 10:00 - 11:50 Spring 

39 



Educational Ministry 



Preaching and Communication 



3. MTS M-417 Learning To Preach In Community 
Wardlaw T 2:00 - 4:50 p.m. 

Wardlaw TBA 

Wardlaw TBA 

B. Preaching and Story 

1. LSTC M-540 Language of Preaching: Shared Story 
Niedenthal TTh 8:30 -9:45 

C. Preaching, Exegesis and Hermeneutics 

1. DIT M-300 Oral Interpretation of Biblical Literature 
Staff M 1:00 -1:50 

2. BTS M-476 Practicum in Biblical Preaching 
Synder/Faus TTh 8 : 00 - 9 : 20 

D. Further Topics in Preaching 

1. LSTC M-452 Christianity and Tragedy 
Niedenthal T 2 :30 - 5:00 p.m. 

2. LSTC M-456 Novels and Sermons of Frederick Buechner 
Niedenthal T 2 : 30 - 5 : 00 p.m. 

3. LSTC M-459 Preaching on Social Issues 
Benne/Niedenthal MW 11 : 00 - 12 : 15 

4. : CCTS M-473 The Church's Electronic Ministry"] 

Kennel T 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 



Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



Fall 

Winter 
Winter 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 
Spring 



EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY OF THE CHURCH 

The Cluster Focus in the area of the Educational Ministry of the Church consists 
of five courses in the field offered by schools of the Cluster. 

The Focus is designed to include the choice of the five courses: one of which is 
to be an introductory course; and of the remaining four advanced level courses, 
one is to be from the category of administration, methods, or resources; and the 
others from electives in the field. At least two of the five courses shall be taken 
with faculty outside of the school of primary registration. 

The certificate endorsing the Cluster Focus shall be signed by a professor of the 
field in the student's own school. 



THE COURSES 



I. INTRODUCTORY 



A. MTS M-313 The Teaching Ministry of the Church 
Priester MW 4 :00 - 5 : 50 p.m. 

B. LSTC M-360 Educational Ministry (Teaching Parish) 
Bozeman TTh 8:30 -9:45 

C. CTU M-463 Resources in Religious Education 
Lucinio Th 10:30 - 1:00 p.m. 

Th 10:30 -1:00 p.m. 



Winter 

Fall 

Fall 
Winter 



II. ADMINISTRATION AND METHODS 



40 



Educational Ministry 



A. NBTS M-382 Organization and Administration of Christian Education 



Jenkins TTh 8:00 -9:20 

B. NBTS M-383 Teaching Methods and Practice 
Morris TBAr 

C. NBTS M-384 Group Process in the Church 
Jenkins T 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

D. MTS M-410 Resources for Church Education 
Priester MW 4:00 - 5:50 p.m. 

E. MTS M-411 Learning Theory and Church Education 
Priester MW 4:00 - 5:50 p.m. 

F. MTS M-412 Models of Teaching in the Church 
Priester T 7:00 - 9:50 p.m. 

G. LSTC M-467 Multi-Media Education 
Bozeman T 2:30 - 5:00 p.m. 

H. LSTC M-490 Church Administration 

Bozeman TTh 8:30-9:45 a.m. 



Spring 

Winter 

Fall 

Spring 

Fall 

Fall 

Spring 

Winter 



M/L M-305 Unitarian Universalist Ministry Seminar: Religious Education 

Spring 



III. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY AND THE LIFE CYCLE 

A. 

Staff TBAr 

B. NBTS M-381 The Teaching Ministry of the Church 
Jenkins TTh 11:00 - 12:15 p.m. 

C. BTS M-398 Theological and Developmental Themes in 



Children's Literature 
Miller 



Preterm Intensive 



D. 



BTS M-398 The Development of Conscience 
Miller TTh 11:00 - 12:20 p.m, 

E. MTS M-404 The Teaching Ministry with Children 
Priester/Wehrheim W 7:00 - 9:50 p.m. 

F. MTS M-407 Intergenerational Education 
Wehrheim F 9:00 - 11:50 a.m. 

G. NBTS M-482 Ministry to the Growing Child 
Morris TBAr 



Fall 



Summer 



Fall 



Winter 



Fall 



Spring 



H. NBTS M-484 Ministry With Youth 

Jenkins/ Amidon 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

I. NBTS M-486 Ministry through Discipled Adults 
Morris TBAr 

J. NBTS M-582 Family Cluster Training Workshop 
Sawin June 22-26 

K. DIT M-584 Practicum in Catechesis in High School Students 

Staff TBAr Every Quarter 

L. DIT M-585 Practicum in Catechesis to Special Education Students 

Staff TBAr Every Quarter 



Winter 



Fall 



Summer 



41 



Canon Law /Supervised Ministry Educational Ministry 

IV. PERSPECTIVES ON EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 

A. NBTS M-381H The Educational Ministry of the Hispanic Churches 

TBA Th 6:00 -9:00 p.m. Fall 

B. CTS CM-427 Christian Education for Social Transformation 

Cancelled Seymour T 2 : 00 - 5 : 00 p . m . Winter 

C. NBTS M-581 Research Seminar in Christian Education 

Jenkins M 1:10 - 3:40 p.m. Spring 



CANON LAW 



THE COURSES 

DIT M-320 Introduction 
Parres 



Fundamental Law, General Norms 
MW 1 : 00 - 2 : 30 p.m. Winter 

DIT M-420 Selected Areas in the Ordering of the Church's Mission 
Parres MWF 9:10 - 10:00 a.m. Spring 

CTU M-421 Church and Structure 

Bogdan TTh 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Winter 

DIT M-421 Legal Aspects of the Sacrament of Matrimony 

Parres MWF 8:10 - 9:00 a.m. Winter 

DIT M-520 Matrimonial Jurisprudence 

Bogdan TBA Spring 



SUPERVISED MINISTRY 



INTRODUCTORY 



MTS M-304, 305, 306 The Practice of Ministry 
Jarvis TBAr 

TBAr 
TBAr 


Fall 304 
Winter 305 
Spring 306 


DIT M-341, 342 Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 
Ulrich TBAr 

TBAr 


Winter 341 
Spring 342 


CTU M-380, 385, 390 Basic Ministry Practicum 
Staff TBAr 

TBAr 
TBAr 


Fall 380 
Winter 385 
Spring 390 


CTU M-517 Reconciliation Practicum 
Ostdiek T 7:00 - 9:00 p.m. 

TTh 1:30 -2:45 p.m. 


Winter 
Spring 



42 



Supervised Ministry 

ADVANCED 

MTS M-405 Field Education Seminar 

Jarvis TBAr Fall 

TBAr Winter 

TBAr Spring 

DIT M-443 Pastoral Care of the Mentally 111 

Ulrich T Fall 

T Spring 

DIT M-444 Pastoral Care of the Pysically 111 

Ulrich T Fall 

T Spring 

DIT M-445 Deacon Internship 

Ulrich, Minogue Intensive Summer 

Intensive Fall 

CTU M-480, 481, 482 Advanced Ministry Practicum: Religious Education 
Lucinio TBAr Fall 480 

TBAr Winter 481 

TBAr Spring 482 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 Advanced Ministry Practicum : Spirituality 
Lozano TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 

CTU M-486, 487, 488 Advanced Ministry Practicum 
Keifer TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 

CTU M-489, 490, 491 Advanced Ministry Practicum 

Community Development 
Boberg TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 Advanced Ministry Practicum 
Szura TBAr 

TBAr 

TBAr 

CTU M-518 Worship Practicum 

Keifer TTh 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. 

Ostdiek T 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

DIT M-540 Intensive Clinical Pastoral Education 

Supervisor TBAr Fall 

TBAr Winter 

TBAr Spring 

DIT M-541, 542, 543 Pastoral Care Through Ministerial Supervision 
Staff TBAr Fall 541 

TBAr Winter 542 

TBAr Spring 543 

43 



Fall 483 
Winter 484 
Spring 485 


Worship 

Fall 486 
Winter 487 
Spring 488 


Fall 489 
Winter 490 
Spring 491 


Social Justice 

Fall 492 
Winter 493 
Spring 494 


Winter 
Spring 



Supervised Ministry 



DIT M-550, 551, 552 The Ministry Education 
Clark TBAr 

TBAr 
TBAr 

DIT M-553, 554, 555 Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 
Ulrich TBAr 

TBAr 
TBAr 



CCTS M-620A, B, C Practicum in Congregational Care 
Staff TBA 

TBA 

TBA 



Fall 550 
Winter 551 
Spring 552 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 



CCTS M-622A-F Practicum in Marriage and Family Counseling 



Swanson, Hebda TBAr Fall A, D 

TBAr Winter B, E 

TBAr Spring C, F 

CCTS M-624A-F Practicum in Pastoral Psychotherapy | 

Staff TBAr Fall A, D 

TBAr Winter B, E 

TBAr Spring C, F 



j CCTS M-626A, B, C Practicum in Group Work and Group Counseling 



Staff 



TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 



| CCTSM-628A, 


B, 


C Practicum in Geriatric Pastoral Care | 


Staff 




TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 


CCTS M-630A, 


B, 


C Practicum in Drug Use and Abuse 


Staff 




TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 


I CCTSM-634A, 


B, 


C Practicum in Religion and Medicine I 


Staff 




TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 


CCTS M-636A, 


B, 


C Practicum in Community Mental Health 


Staff 




TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 


| CCTSM-638A, 


B, 


C Practicum in Clinical Pastoral Education 



Staff 



TBAr 
TBAr 
TBAr 



Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 

Fall A 
Winter B 
Spring C 



44 



Hispanic Studies Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 

INTERDISCIPLINARY/INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 

A. NBTS 1-300 Nature and Mission of the Church 

Nelson WF 8:00 - 9:20 a.m. Fall 

B. CTU 1-415 M.T.S. Colloquium 

Dunning Th 10:30 - 1:00 p.m. Fall 

C. CTU 1-595 Heritage Colloquium 

Szura/Linnan W 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 



A. iCCTS 1-560 Cross-Cultural Communication: A Cluster Intensive 



Barbour/Boberg M 9:00 - 3:00; W 3:00 - 9:00 Spring 



B. CCTS 1-461, 462, 463 Feminist Studies: Cluster Intensives 



Bozeman and Staff Th 12:30 - 4:30 p.m. Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST WITHIN COURSES OF STUDY 

HISPANIC STUDIES 

Hispanic Ministry programs and courses in the Cluster seek 1) to train Hispanics 
and Spanish-speaking non-Hispanics for Hispanic ministries, using specially 
designed courses most of which are offered in the Spanish language, and 2) more 
broadly, to incorporate Hispanic issues, contributions, and perspectives, through a 
variety of approaches, into the total life of the Cluster and its preparation of 
ministers. 

THE FACULTY 

Ruben P. Armendariz (MTS) Jorge Morales (MTS) 

Ismael Garcfa (MTS) Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) 

Jorge Gonzalez (MTS) Robert Navarro (LSTC) 

SPECIAL COURSES 

MTS H-312 Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

Gonzalez (ADJ) TBA Fall 

MTS M-316 Community Organization as a Church Concern 

Morales (ADJ) TBA Fall 

MTS M-427 Hispanic Ministry Travel Seminar 

Armendariz TBA Winter 

MTS T-315 Hispanic American Resources for Theological Reflection 
Armendariz M 2 : 00 - 4 : 50 p.m. Winter 

MTS E-439 Social Ethics in the Hispanic American Context 

North and South 
Garcia F 9 : 00 - 11 : 50 a.m. Winter 

45 



Hispanic Studies Judaic Studies /Black Studies 

MTS M-444 Worship and Liturgy in Hispanic Congregations 

Armendariz W 7 : 00 - 9 : 50 p . m . Spring 

MTS M-400 Religion and the Social Sciences 

Garcia F 9 : 00 - 11 : 50 a .m . Spring 

NBTS C-359H Sociology of Religion: An Hispanic Perspective 

Mottesi T 6:00 -9:00 Winter 

NBTS M-381H The Educational Ministry of the Hispanic Churches 

TBA Th 6:00 -9:00 p.m. Fall 

LSTC M-415 Ministry in Hispanic Communities: 

Ministerio en Communidades Hispanicas 
Navarro M W 2 : 30 - 3 : 45 Spring 

MTS M-427 Hispanic Ministry Travel Seminar 

Armendariz TBA Winter 

LSTC T-458 Hispanic- American Christologies 

Navarro MW 2:30 - 3:45 p.m. Winter 

NBTS C-459H Sociology of Religion in the Hispanic Community 

TBA Th 6:00 -9:00 p.m. Spring 

NBTS C-558H Social Ethics: Hispanic Issues, Thinkers and Approaches 
Mottesi T 6:00 -9:00 Fall 

NBTS M-360 Church and Society 

Mottesi M 1:10- 3:40 p.m. Spring 



BLACK STUDIES 

THE FACULTY 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Charles Shelby Rooks (CTS) 

Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Colvin Blanford (NBTS) 

SPECIAL COURSES 

NBTS M-369 A History of Black Congregations and Denominations 
Blanford M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-430 Black Theology and the Black Church 

Pero M 7:00 -10:00 p.m. Winter 

LSTC T-434 The Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

Pero T 2 -.30-5:00 p.m. Spring 

NBTS M-468 Black Church and Black Theologies 

Blanford M 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

LSTC T-456 Liberation Theology 

Pero MW 2:30 -3:45 Winter 



JUDAIC STUDIES 

In order to bring the Cluster community significantly in touch with Jewish life 

46 



Women's Studies 



Judaic Studies 



and thought, the Cluster offers courses in the history, religion and ideas of the 
Jewish people. Cluster students are encouraged to take advantage of the course of- 
ferings at Spertus College of Judaica with whom the Cluster has an agreement for 
reciprocal free cross-registration of students. A Spertus catalog can be obtained by 
writing to : 

Spertus College of Judaica 

618 South Michigan Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60605 

(312) 922-9012 



THE FACULTY 
Andre Lacocque (CTS) 



Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) 



SPECIAL COURSES 



CCTS B-453 Current Issues in Jewish-Christian Dialogue 



Perelmuter/ Sherman M 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. Spring 

CTU M-461 Liturgy of the Synagogue: Pattern and Practice 

Perelmuter TTh 12:00 - 1:15 p.m. Fall 

CTS CH-493 An Inquiry into Contemporary Judaism : 

The Holocaust : Roots and Response 
Manschreck M6:30-9:30p.m. Spring 

CTU M-562 Liturgy of the Synagogue : Advanced Seminar 

Perelmuter TTh 9:00 - 10:15 a.m. Spring 

CTS CH-610B Intertestamental Literature 

Lacocque TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. Winter 



WOMEN'S STUDIES 

Women's issues and their relation to human problems are an integral part of the 
Cluster, its student life, faculty, and courses. In addition to a concerned group of 
students in nearly every Cluster school, there is a Women's Caucus of Faculty and 
Administrators whose responsibility is to spark ideas and programs aimed at 
raising of consciousness with regard to the role of women and feminine motifs in 
theological education. 



THE FACULTY 

Adela Yarbro Collins (MTS) 
Cynthia Jarvis (MTS) 
Peggy Way (MTS) 
Carol Wehrheim (MTS) 



Rose Horman Arthur (M/L) 
Jean Bozeman (LSTC) 
Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 
Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) 



SPECIAL COURSES 

MTS M-428 The Future of Pastoral Theology : Definition of a Discipline 
Way TBA Fall 

MTS T-333 Doctrines in Transition : Men, Women 

Parker /Jarvis T 2 : 00 - 4 : 50 p . m . Winter 



47 



Cluster Cooperatives 



Women's Studies 



M/L TS-361 Women and Religion: Theological Reflection 
Arthur Th 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. 

CTU B-576 The Ministry of Women in the Early Church 
Osiek MW 3:00 -4:15 p.m. 



seepP- 



CCTS 1-461, 462, 463 Feminist Studies 



Bozeman and Staff 



Th 12:30 -4:30 p.m. 



Spring 

Winter 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 



THE CLUSTER COOPERATIVE COURSES 

In addition to the courses offered by the member seminaries per se, the following 
courses (designed CCTS) are available, representing team-taught or team-planned 
courses which include faculty from two or more Cluster schools or faculty engaged 
by the Cluster as a whole. In some cases, in an effort to further cross-registration, 
the class meeting site will be moved between several schools depending on the 
number of students enrolled in the class from the respective schools. Faculty from 
outside the Cluster Schools are Marilyn K. Creel and David J. McGown. 



CCTS M-441 Parish-Based Ministry with Commuter Colleges 
McGown /Creel Th 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 



CCTS M-473 Church's Electronic Ministry 



Kennel/Spivey M 7:00 - 10:00 p.m. 

CCTS M-532 Preaching and Storytelling | 



Kennel/Niedenthal/Piletic 



CCTS H-560 The Augustinian Tradition: Grace and Freedom 



Fischer 



MW 1:00- 2:15 



CCTS 1-560 Cross-Cultural Communication: A Cluster Intensive 
Barbour /Boberg MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Sept. 28 - Oct. 21 



1 CCTS M-591 Pastoral Care: History and Theology 
Ashby F 9:00 -12:00 



CCTS M-592 Personality Theories and Therapies 



Swanson 



F9:00-12:00 



CCTS M-593 Pastoral Care: Stress and Crisis 1982-83 



>wanson 



F 9:00 -12:00 



CCTS 1-461, 462, 463 Feminist Studies 



Bozeman and Staff 



Th 12:30 -4:30 p.m. 



CCTS M-535 Psychology of Relig ion 1981-82 
Swanson F 9:00 -12:00 



Spring 
Spring 
Spring 
Spring 
Fall 
Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Fall 
Winter 
Spring 

Spring 



48 



THE CLUSTER AREAS OF CONCENTRATION 

Among a variety of cooperative enterprises, the Cluster offers programs of 
education for ministry which draw in an integrated manner upon the resources of 
its member schools and the metropolitan Chicago area. These are courses which 
often meet outside the regular course schedule: CCTS 1-500, Personal Trans- 
formation; CCTS 1-520, Social Transformation; CCTS 1-560, Cross Cultural 
Transformation; and CCTS 1-570, Interpretation and Communication; CCTS I- 
461, 462, 463 Feminist Studies. Only 1-560 and 1-461, 462, 463 are offered this 
year. The Cluster areas of concentration may be summarized: 

1. Since each school in the Cluster continues to offer its own in- 
troductory and advanced requirements related to such matters as 
denominational and confessional identity, spiritual formation, and 
ordination, the Cluster Areas of Concentration are not designed as a 
core curriculum in which all beginning students in each of the 
schools are expected to participate. Rather, the Cluster Con- 
centrations are designed as intermediate and advanced elective of- 
ferings which are open to students who have completed at least one 
year of theological education and who have satisfied such other 
prerequisites as may be appropriate in a particular area. 

2. The Concentrations are designed to transcend the personal and 
professional fragmentation which frequently accompanies 
educational experiences which are circumscribed by a particular 
discipline or field or by a particular ministerial role or setting. 
Therefore, the Concentrations have been organized in terms of broad 
areas of functional competence which are relevant to a variety of 
ministerial roles and settings and which are dependent upon the in- 
tegration of performance and insights from a variety of disciplines. 

The Concentrations have been designed to provide a maximum of instructional, 
contextual, formational, professional, ecumenical and institutional interfacing. 
Structured on the basis of differential student participation, the Concentrations 
seek to develop both a generalized and a specialized and, what may correspond to 
neither, an individualized competence, while at the same time they remain suf- 
ficiently standardized to provide a functional degree of educational coherence and 
administrative compatability. 



CCTS 1-560 CROSS-CULTURAL COMMUNICATION: INTENSIVE UNIT 



Fall Quarter, 1982 toward unity on the economic and 

1 or 3 Full Courses Credit: political planes, the deeper 

consult Staff realization of cultural pluralism 

MW 1:30 -2 :45p.m. within that unity, and the greater 

Sept. 28 - Oct. 21 plus some week-end involvement in the struggle for 

experiences. human dignity have all given new 

Enrollment limited to 20 thrust and direction to the 

Initial session at CTU church's task in the world today. 
Barbour/ Boberg The global scope and character 

I. Rationale of the problems demand an equal 

The church is at the threshold response. It is of the greatest im- 

of a new era. The growing thrust portance that Christians of diverse 

49 



national, racial, class and 
theological backgrounds, per- 
spective and commitments find 
ways to listen to and learn from 
one another. If American 
theological education is to make 
creative contributions to such 
issues as racism, the use and 
distribution of the world's weath 
and resources, the struggles for 
human liberation and the develop- 
ment of societal structures which 
are more open and just, it must do 
so as a community which has 
learned to reflect and act in an in- 
ternational context. 

For some the response will go 
further. They desire to be persons 
of dialogue, to live a precarious 
existence between different 
cultural worlds. They aim to 
spend their lives, or part of them, 
with people of another culture, 
discovering ways to think and 
work together in Christ about the 
fundamental problems which con- 
front the entire human family in 
relation to peace, justice and sur- 
vival . 

II. Nature of the Intensive 

The concentration has a double 
major thrust which will serve the 
needs and goals of a wide variety 
of students. On the one hand, it 
will give high priority to those 
students who desire to work or 
study in another cultural en- 
vironment and will help them 
acquire beginning levels of com- 
petence for effective com- 
munication in cultures and sub- 
cultures other than their own. 

At the same time, the con- 
centration will provide a wider 
range of students the opportunity 
to experience in a unique way the 
cultural assumptions and limits of 
their theological thinking, and to 
lay the foundation for a broader 



international, interracial and 
ecumenical understanding, con- 
cern and commitment both in 
their theological education as well 
as in their further ministry. 

III. Aims of the Unit 

The general aims of the In- 
tensive include the following: 

A. to sensitize students to the 
diversity of cultural ex- 
pression; 

B. to assist students to develop 
skills in the analysis of culture 
and communication and to 
acquire a beginning competence 
in cross-cultural com- 
munication; 

C.to lay a foundation for stu- 
dents' understanding of, con- 
cern for, and cooperation in 
issues of international scope 
and character; 

D.to help students to interpret 
their experience to the wider 
church in order to contribute to 
an international perspective on 
mission and ministry. 

IV. Structure of the Intensive 

There are three principal com- 
ponents in the Intensive: basic 
theory of culture and com- 
munication, field placements, in- 
tegrative discussions ("de- 
briefings"). (Within the scheduled 
activities students enrolled for two 
full courses credit may negotiate 
appropriately reduced in- 
volvement.) 
A. Basic Theory (Four weeks) 

The theoretical presentations 
will focus on such matters as 
understanding the ways in 
which cultural factors influence 
experiencing and sym- 
bolization, thereby influencing 
the ways in which com- 
munication is given and 
received; understanding the 
nature of any culture through a 



50 



representative examination of 
selected contrasting cultures 
and subcultures in the light of 
cultural anthropological per- 
spectives; understanding the 
theological issues involved in 
the cultural conditioning of all 
experience and symbolization; 
understanding the nature of the 
communication process from 
theological, psychological and 
sociological perspectives; and 
understanding what it means 
theologically to communicate 
the meaning of the Christian 
faith. 

Such understanding will be 
addressed through the 
following topics: 

1. Culture: Nature and 
Origin; Enculturation — 
Ethnocentrism — Prejudice ; 
Culture Dynamics: Per- 
sistance and Change 

2. My Culture: Historical 
Background, Common 
Characteristics 

3. Communication Theory: 
Verbal — dialogue; Non-ver- 
bal 

4. Obstacles to Com- 
muncation: Historical; 
Cultural 

5. Communication of the 
Gospel : 

a. Why: Theology of 
Mission 

b. How: Evangelization: 
Dialogue (Religious) ; Wit- 
ness; Worship 

6. Global Awareness: Peace 
and Justice; Population 
Growth Development 

7. Introduction to specific 
culture of field placements. 

B. Field Placements (Three weeks) 
The field placement is an in- 
tegral part of the unit. It is 
designed to offer students an 
opportunity to practice and 



develop skills and to test 
theories of cross-cultural com- 
munication in an authentic 
cross-cultural life situation. The 
placement provides a total live- 
in experience of ministry and 
spirituality in minority com- 
munities in the Chicago area, 
and includes planned super- 
vision and guidance, and the 
availability of a peer group, 
reflection group or other sup- 
port group. 

Participants spend the first 
week with the Hispanic com- 
munity in Gary, Indiana, 
laying foundations for 
becoming persons of dialogue 
and experiencing the work 
among the communities there. 
In the following two weeks, the 
experience is continued in the 
Shalom Community in 
Chicago, with experience, 
prayer and work among the 
Black and Native American 
communities. 
C. Integrative Discussions (Two 
weeks) 

Following the three-weeks in- 
tensive field placement, stu- 
dents will engage in a two- 
week, post-field "de-briefing" 
period during which their cross- 
cultural field experiences will 
be reported on, analyzed and 
critically evaluated from the 
standpoint of personal learning 
and growth. Every student will 
be expected to have kept a 
complete diary (log) of field ex- 
periences. 

A clear expectation of the 
"de-briefing" period is that all 
students will evaluate and 
process their field experience in 
such a way as to make concrete 
plans for application in terms 
of ministry. These plans may 
be of an interpretive or 



51 



vocational nature. 
V. Admission to the Intensive 

Open to students who have 
completed one or more years of 



theological education and who 
have obtained the approval of the 
school in which they are 
matriculated. 



CCTS 1-461, 462, 463 FEMINIST STUDIES: INTENSIVE UNITS 



jLdded 



$ce Bozeman and Staff Th 12 : 30 - 4 : 30 p.m. 



Fall, Winter, Spring 



140 



52 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS (ORGANIZED BY TERM) 



SUMMER 1981 



MTS B-321/322 

Introduction to Hebrew Exegesis I, II 
A non-divisible two-quarter sequence involving 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
followed by translation and exegesis of selected 
portions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. 
Attention will be given to fundamentals of text 
criticism and general principles of biblical in- 
terpretation. Double course. 
Schmitt Aug. 31 - Sept. 20th: Summer 

MTWThF9-ll 

Boling Sec. I: MTWTh8-8:50 Fall 

Sec. II: MTWTh9-9:50 

NBTS M-379 

Stimulating Church Growth In A Local 

Congregation — A Basic Seminar 

Based upon an analysis of Church Growth 
within the American Baptist Churches, USA, 
this intensive seminar /workshop will utilize a 
biblical model from the Book of Acts to prepare 
congregations for growth and a research orien- 
ted diagnostic method for designing a strategy 
for growth. Participants will be given help in 
the preparation of a preliminary plan for im- 
plementing church growth in a local 
congregation. 
Nelson June 8-12 Summer 

NBTS M-575 

Stimulating Discipleship in a Local 

Congregation — An Advanced Seminar 

Based on a biblical study of discipleship and the 



exploration of various models used in discipling 
church members, this intensive 

seminar/workshop will enable pastors or other 
church leaders to design a specific discipleship 
program for the local congregation. 
Duncan Mcintosh June 15-19 Summer 

BTS M-398 

Theological and Developmental Themes 

in Children's Literature 

The course will examine children's literature ap- 
propriate to different age levels from two years 
through adolescence in terms of theological and 
developmental themes. Nursery rhymes, fairy 
tales, and other stories will be studied for struc- 
ture and meaning and will be related to typical 
moral, cognitive, and emotional patterns. 
Miller Preterm Intensive 

NBTS M-582 

Family Cluster Training Workshop 

The Family Cluster Model which was developed 
in 1970 provides leadership training in family 
enrichment for local churches. The course is 
taught by the designer of the program in a 
special session and includes evening demon- 
stration sessions with Christian families from 
the area. 
Sawin June 22-26 Summer 

DIT M-445 
Deacon Internship 

Open to those ordained deacons who have com- 
pleted M-340-342 and M-443-444. This is a 
clinical internship with onsite supervision and 
ten two-hour theological reflection sessions. 
Ulrich/ Minogue Intensive Summer/Fall 




53 



Old Testament 



FALL 1981 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

OLD TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC B-330 
Bible Survey 

This course is intended for students needing a 

basic introduction to the Bible and its content. 

Reading of the Bible will be supplemented with 

information on biblical times, geography, and 

history. 

Fuerst MW 1:00 -2:15 Fall 

DIT B-341 

General Introduction to Scripture 

This course explains the theological un- 
derstanding of inspiration, canonicity, and 
magisterium in regard to the Bible as they 
emerge from the Scriptures themselves. It 
studies also the history of the text, translations, 
archaeology, biblical geography and the history 
of exegesis. The course also explains some 
preliminary notions about methodologies. Book 
reports and examination are required. 
Fischer /VanLinden MWF9-.10-10 Fall 

CTU B-300A, B, C 

Old Testament Introduction 

The books and religious traditions of the Old 
Testament are studied against their historical 
and cultural background, primarily for their 
own sake but also for their religious and 
pastoral implications. Students will demonstrate 
an ability to interpret and explain major 
traditions and literary types. The course is 
designed not only to prepare for further indepth 
study of the Bible but also to enrich high school 
teachers and adult discussion leaders. 
Bergant Sec. A: MW 12- 1:15 Fall 

Hoppe Sec. B: MW 1:30 -2:45 Fall 

Hoppe Sec. C: M 7 -9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTS CH-301 

People & Faith of Israel I 

An introduction for beginning students to the 
problems of the historical and theological in- 
terpretation of the Old Testament against the 
background of the development of historical 
methods of biblical study. 
Lacocque MW 11 -12:20 Fall 



BTS B-323 

Introduction to the Old Testament 

The goal of this course is to give the student an 
introduction to the history and thought of Israel 
in Old Testament times. The student will read a 
history of the life and literature of Israel plus 
other student selected materials. 
Roop TTH9-9:20 Fall 

MTS B-301 

The Yahwist Revolution: Introduction to the 

Old Testament 

Introduction to Israel's antecedents, birth as a 
people, and early life as a nation, focusing on 
Genesis to I Samuel. Attention is given to ap- 
propriate critical methods for general Old 
Testament study, and to the content and 
theology of Israel's early epic traditions and 
law. 
Campbell MW2-3-.50 Fall 

LSTC B-310 

Old Testament Studies I 

Introduction to the Pentateuch and survey of 
Israel's history through the United Monarchy, 
with particular attention to the problems of 
Exodus and Conquest. 

Fuerst, Michel MWF9-9-.50 Fall 

NBTS B-323 

Old Testament I: Archaeology, History 

and Content 

This course is an introduction to the history of 
ancient Israel. Attention is given to relevant ar- 
chaeological work done in the Near East and to 
the content of the historical books of the Old 
Testament. 
Bjornard W-F 10:40-12 Fall 

II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

NBTS B-425 
Interpretation of Hosea 

The book is studied in seminar especially for the 
tension between conventional language and 
revelatory insights. Attention is given to text 
and form, to literature and redaction, to 
language and theology. 
Bjornard TTh8-9:20 Fall 

LSTC B-513 
Psalms 

A study of the hymnbook of the Old Testament 
and of the Jewish and Christian communities. 



54 



Old Testament 



The course will investigate the poetic forms, the 
religious and theological teachings, the piety, 
the Ancient Near Eastern background, and the 
function of the psalms. Special attention will be 
given to the most recent insights in our un- 
derstanding of Hebrew poetry. Prerequisite: B- 
312 or equivalent. 
Michel MW 1-2:15 Fall 

CTS CH-412 

Exegesis of the Old Testament II/Qoheleth 

(Ecclesiastes) 

An exegetical study of an Old Testament book, 
or part thereof. The knowledge of Hebrew is no 
prerequisite, but reference is made in an un- 
derstandable way to the original terminology of 
the text under consideration. Books under con- 
sideration are preexilic and exilic prophetic 
books. In the Fall Quarter 1981 the book under 
consideration will be Qoheleth (Ecclesiastes). 
Lacocque M 2 - 5 Fall 

BTS B-420 

Job and Proverbs 

This course will open with a study of wisdom 
theology and literature in general and center in 
on Job. The class will look at some modern in- 
terpretations of Job. 
Roop TTh 11 -12:20 Fall 

CTU B-509 
Seminar in Job 

The Book of Job will be studied as a literary 
unit with a profound religious message. At- 
tention will be given to literary structure and 
style in order to see how they contribute to the 
theological intent of the final author. Themes 
such as the justice of God, unexplained suffering 
and retribution will be investigated in great 
detail. The course will be conducted as a 
seminar with group participation expected. 
Knowledge of Hebrew is not required. 
Bergant T 1:30 -4 p.m. Fall 

CTS CH-610A 

Second Temple Period Literature /Qoheleth 
(Ecclesiastes) 

A doctoral seminar. Hebrew and/or Greek are 
requisite. Consent of the professor needed. This 
is an "ongoing" seminar, each quarter having 
however its own integrity. The focus is on 
canonical and extracanonical, prophetic, 
apocalyptic, sapiential and early Christian texts. 
They are studied as much as possible in their 
original languages and their theological issues 
are dealt with in depth. Especially meant for the 



Th.D. candidates in the Center for Jewish 
Christian Studies, the seminar is open to 
everyone fulfilling the requirements for ad- 
mission. 
Lacocque T 9:30 -12:20 Fall 

III. THEOLOGY 

BTS B-426 

The Covenant in Biblical Tradition 

An examination of convenants and convenantal 
relations in scripture. Attention will be given 
both to a very basic, fundamental bonding be- 
tween God and God's creation and to explicit 
covenantal events in the Old and New 
Testaments. 
Meyer WF 10:40 -12 Fall 

MTS B-423 

Wealth and Poverty in the Bible 

Collins T 7:00 -9:50 p.m. Fall 

(CENTER) See p. 78 

IV. HERMENEUTICS OR 
RABBINICS 

V. OLD TESTAMENT WORLD 

VI. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

NBTS B-311A 
Hebrew I 

Through a reading of the book of Esther in the 
Masoretic text and other selected passages from 
the Old Testament, the student will acquire a 
mastery of the analysis of Hebrew morphology 
and the structure of Hebrew syntax sufficient 
for independent reading of the Hebrew text of 
the Old Testament and, if desired, to pursue ad- 
vanced studies in the language. 
TBA TWF1-.10-2 Fall 

MTS B-3 21/322 Introduction to Hebrew 
Exegesis I, II 

A non-divisible two-quarter sequence involving 
the learning of the elements of Hebrew grammar 
followed by translation and exegesis of selected 
portions of the Hebrew Bible, primarily prose. 
Attention will be given to fundamentals of text 
criticism and general principles of biblical in- 
terpretation. Double course. 
Schmitt Aug. 31 - Sept. 20th Summer 

MTWThF9-ll 

Boling Sec. I: MTWTh8-8:50 Fall 

Sec. II: MTWTh9-9:50 



55 



New Testament 



NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

NBTS B-433 
Exegesis in Mark 

The interpretation of Mark from the Greek New 
Testament. Special attention is given to Synop- 
tic relationships and detailed exegesis of special 
passages in the Gospel. 
Guelich TTh 9:30 - 10:50 Fall 

CTU B-435 

The Gospel According to Luke 

An analysis of the entire Gospel and its major 
theological themes. Particular attention will be 
given to the evangelist's role as interpreter of the 
Jesus tradition for a missionary community. The 
course will consider the theological and 
ministerial relevance of Luke's message for such 
questions as poor and rich, church leadership, 
and prayer. 
Karris TTh 12 -1:15 Fall 

MTS B-401 

The Gospel of John 

An exegesis course, with attention to the book's 
literary problems, its affinities with Hellenistic 
and Jewish traditions, its place in the developing 
thought of the early Church and the significance 
of its symbolic language and theology for the 
Christian faith today. 
Hilgert MW 10 -11: 50 Fall 

CTS CH-426 

The Books of Acts as a Theological Classic 

A study of our only 'history' of early 
Christianity, from the perspective that the 
history is controlled by theological concerns of 
the early second century author. Attention will 
be paid to what historical information can be 
gleaned, what can be learned about the literary 
techniques of the author, and what are the 
author's theological perspectives. 
Scroggs TTh 9:30-10:50 Fall 

CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

The gospel will be studied according to its 
distinctive style and theology, its overall struc- 
ture and concern. Key sections will be used to 



highlight such major Johannine motifs as 

religious symbolism, sacraments, community 
and spirituality. 

Senior MW 1:30 -2:45 Fall 

Karris MW 1:30 -2:45 Spring 

MTS B-313 
Paul 

Introduction to the generative insights of Paul, 
his letters and the historical contexts of the let- 
ters. 
Collins MW 10 -11: 50 Fall 

DIT B-415 

Selected Pauline Epistles 

This course attempts to give a survey of Pauline 
Epistles within an historical context. Special at- 
tention will be paid to I Cor., Rom., and Eph. 
Emphasis will be placed on the literary form of 
Pauline Epistles and the development of a 
methodology for interpreting the Epistles. Book 
reports and a scholarly paper are required. As 
an alternative to the paper, opportunity will be 
offered to some students for translating their 
academic work into popular communication by 
participation in lay discussion groups. 
Prerequisites: B-341. 
Fischer/ VanLinden MWF 10:10-11 Fall 

DIT B-531 

The Letter to the Hebrews and The Pastorals 

A study of two parts of the New Testament 
which do not fall into the main lines of New 
Testament thought. Seminar discussions and 
guided reading will result in an exegesis paper 
plus its application in a related "pastoral 
project." Prerequisite: B-341. 
VanLinden M Fall 

III. NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY 

NBTS B-431 

New Testament Theology 

A detailed study of the major themes of the 

New Testament in the light of their historical 

development, their unity, and their relationship 

to the faith and practice of the early Church as 

well as the Church today. 

Guelich W-F8-9-.20 Fall 

CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting. Study of such Pauline motifs 



56 



New Testament 



as law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death 
and resurrection. Church and apostleship — and 
their import for the contemporary church. 
Karris TTh9-10:15 Fall 

Karris MW 10:30 - 11 :45 Spring 

CTS CH-522 

Theologies of the Resurrection and 

Death of Jesus in the New Testament 

A study of the meanings early Christian 
thinkers awarded the events of the resurrection 
and death of Jesus. Not only will the relevant 
New Testament texts be studied in detail, but 
post-New Testament documents will be included 
when important for clarification. Prerequisite: 
CH-321 or equivalent. 
Scroggs W 6:30 -9:30 Fall 



DIT B-590 
Special Topics 

Staff 



TBAt 



Upon Request 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT ETHICS 



LSTC B-544 

Exegesis of Selected Texts in Acts 

After a brief introduction to the book of Acts, 

we will select various texts, such as narratives, 

reports, miracles, speeches, and analyze them 

exegetically. We will try to determine their Sitz 

im Leben, their historical implications and their 

theological meaning. 

Linss MW 2:30 -3:45 Fall 

VI. NEW TESTAMENT WORLD 

CTU B-526 

Rabbinic Judaism and the Early Church 

Designed to deepen the student's understanding 
of the relationship of Christianity to rabbinic 
Judaism and to develop a capacity to interpret 
Jewish sources, this seminar will serve as an op- 
portunity to examine the nature of rabbinic 
Judaism and the rabbinic mind through an ex- 
ploration of pertinent talmudic and midrashic 
material. 
Perelmuter TTh 9-10:15 Fall 



DIT B-541 

The Bible and Ethics 

A seminar examining the Biblical basis of ethical 
studies. The course will investigate two foci: the 
legal tradition and the wisdom tradition. 
Materials will be taken from both the Old 
Testament and the New Testament. 
Prerequisites: B-442-443; B-450-451 ; B-415 or 
similar courses. 
Fischer T Fall 

V. EXEGESIS & METHODOLOGY 

BTS B-438 

Biblical Seminar: Parables and the Language of 

Faith 

is concerned with our use of 
itself, faithful or idolatrous. 

be examined as to how persons 
discern and properly communicate truth 
signified by but not contained in words of faith. 
Meyer WF8-9-.20 Fall 

LSTC B-537 
Parables of Jesus 

Exegetical and tradition-historical studies in a 
selected group of parables. Prerequisite: B-311 
or equivalent. 
Voobus TF 1-2:15 Fall 



This course 
language as, 
Parables will 



VII. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

LSTC B-200 

New Testament Greek 

A basic study of the Greek books of the New 
Testament, aiming at the utilizing of the 
language in exegesis. 
Linss, Staff MWF8-8-.50 Fall 

BTS B-316A 

Elements of New Testament Greek I, II, III 

In this course the student acquires a knowledge 
of the elements of grammar, a working 
vocabulary and skill in translation of the Greek 
New Testament. Selections from the Gospels, 
Acts, Paul and the General Epistles will be read. 
Barton TWF1-.10-2 Fall 

NBTS B-316A 

Elements of New Testament Greek I, II, III 

In this course the student acquires a knowledge 

of the elements of grammar, a working 

vocabulary, and skill in translation of the Greek 

New Testament. Selections from the Gospels, 

Acts, Paul, and the General Epistles will be 

read. 

Barton TWF1-.10-2 Fall 



57 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



MTS B-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II 

Study of elementary Greek grammar, practice in 
translation, with introductory attention to 
exegesis. A non-divisible course of two quarters. 
Reeves Sec. I: MTWTh 8 - 8:50 Fall 

Sec. II: MTWTh 9-9:50 

HISTORICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS H-319/320 

The Growth of the Christian Tradition: 

A History of Christian Doctrine 

Broadly speaking, it will be the purpose of this 
course to investigate what the Christian Church 
believed, taught, and confessed in its encounter 
with the world around it. The sources for this 
critical study will be many, including the lives 
of saints and sinners, the teachings of Church 
father and mothers, the decisions of Church 
councils, the development of liturgical life of the 
Church, the formation of the institutional ex- 
pressions of the Church's mission, the influence 
of great controversies both within and without 
the Church, and the importance of significant 
moments of crises as the Church encountered 
movements in human history — political, 
economic and cultural. The fundamental issue 
which the course will raise is whether or not, 
given all the diversities which run throughout 
the Church's story, there is indeed a Christian 
tradition as such, and if so, what its essential 
elements are. The thesis of the course is that a 
critical understanding of the nature and growth 
of such a tradition is clearly necessary for reflect- 
ing upon the Christian life and thinking about 
the calling of the Church. Part One: From the 
Development of the Catholic Tradition to the 
Evolution of Medieval Theology. Part Two: 
From the Age of Renaissance and Reformation 
to the Age of Reason. Note: In so far as 
possible, each of the two quarters of this course 
has been designed to be taken independently. 
They are, nevertheless, part of one story and it 
is highly recommended that students should 
take Part One before attempting to take Part 
Two. 

Rigdon MW 2- 3:50 p.m. Fall 

TTh 7 - 9 p.m. Winter 

BTS H-346 

History of Christianity I 

This course provides an overview of Christian 



history from the apostolic period to the Treaty 
of Westphalia (1648). Among topics covered are 
the presuppositions of Christian History, the 
Early Church and Roman Culture, the Con- 
stantinian Church, the Augustinian Synthesis, 
the Conversion of Europe, Monastic Orders, 
Eastern Orthodoxy, the Sectarian Dissent, the 
Magisterial Reformers, the Catholic Refor- 
mation, the Religious Wars. 
Wagner M TTh 2:10-3 Fall 

CTU H-302 

Early Expansion of Christianity 

A study is made of the Church as it encounters 
new cultures and changes from being a Jewish 
community to a Graeco-Roman community. In- 
stitutional, devotional and doctrinal develop- 
ments are all considered. The over-all question 
that the course attempts to answer is: are there 
any identifiable dynamics at work when the 
Church has been incarnated in one culture and 
then seeks to incarnate herself in another? 
Project and examinations. 
Nemer MW3-4-.15 Fall 

DIT H-307 

History of the Church to 700 A.D. 

An introduction to patristic thought, especially 
as it applies to major beliefs of the Christian 
religion. A survey of the sociopolitical climate 
of the period as to the effect it had on the 
development of Church structures. 
Groves MW8-.10-9 Fall 

CTS CH-341 

Christian Church in the World: Early Church 

This course, designed specifically for those who 
have had little or no church history, seeks to 
depict and interpret the Christian community's 
development in interaction with the world. Lec- 
tures and discussions will center upon key 
figures, critical events, forces of change and 
reaction, and the main conceptions which have 
defined the character of the Christian com- 
munity in its interaction with successive stages 
of our culture from the early church through the 
early medieval developments. 
Manschreck MW 11 -12:20 Fall 

LSTC H-330A 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 
Church History outside America, designed to 
show in broad perspective the movements 
which have shaped world Christianity in our 



58 



Historical Studies 



time. Lectures and discussions of selected source 

readings. 

Fischer MWF9-9-.50 Fall 

BTS H-340 

The Believers' Church 

A study of the meaning, rise, and development 
of the Free Church tradition within Christianity 
from the Reformation to the present day and its 
implications for contemporary churches. 
Durnbaugh TTh 9:30 - 10:50 Fall 

NBTS C-342 

Reformation and Modern Christianity 

Major issues and developments in Christian life 
and thought from the time of the Reformation 
to the present are examined in order (1) to better 
understand contemporary expressions of 
Christianity, (2) to acquire some knowledge of 
historical methodology, and (3) to develop 
ability at interpreting religious movements and 
evaluating the significance of past movements 
for today. Regular and intensive reading, both 
in primary and secondary sources, is em- 
phasized as a basis for meaningful classroom 
discussion. 
Ohlmann TTh 9:30 - 10:50 Fall 

MTS H-438 

British Theology in the Age of Reason 

Fundamental changes in science and philosophy 
and their impact of the theology of the late 
seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The 
Trinitarian, Deist, and Arminian controversies 
will be examined, and some attention will be 
given to evangelical, philosophical, and literary 
alternatives to rationalism. 
Schafer F 9- 11:50 Fall 

II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

MTS H-312 

Critical History of the Spanish Bible 

This course will examine the historical develop- 
ment as well as critical studies in the translation 
of the Spanish Bible from the original 
languages. 
Gonzalez TBA Fall 

LSTC H-360 
Lutheran Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are nor- 



mative for Lutheran ministry and church life 
today. Recent confessional statements and 
results of inter-confessional dialogues are taken 
into account. 

Scherer MW 1-2:15 Fall 

MTS H-406 

The American Presbyterian and 

Reformed Churches 

A historical survey of the major Presbyterian 
and Reformed bodies in America, with special 
attention to the theological and institutional 
history of the United Presbyterian Church. 
Schafer TTh 10 -11 -.50 Fall 

III. HISTORY-INDIVIDUALS 



LSTC H-435 
Theology of Luther 

The purpose of this course is to introduce the 
student to Luther's theology in its broad com- 
prehensiveness and its dynamic thrust. Selected 
works in various categories are discussed in 
class. The student reads other works of his or 
her own choosing and prepares a term paper. 
Fischer MWF 11 -11:50 Fall 

CTS CH-491 

Contrasting Philosophies of History 

A study of Augustine's Christian prototype. The 
City of God, in contrast and comparison with 
more recent philosophies of history to be select- 
ed by the seminar participants. Evaluation for 
relevance and formulation of a viable stance 
today will be attempted. 
Manschreck T 2-5 Fall 

IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 



CTU H-415 

Our American Catholic Heritage: 1776-1918 
This course, through lectures and readings, will 
study the major influences on the development 
of the Roman Catholic Church in the 19th and 
early 20th centuries, e.g., her minority status, 
anti-catholic bias in the mid-19th century, 
trusteeism in the Church, the influx of im- 
migrants, the Civil War, the School con- 
troversy, the Americanist Heresy, etc. The 
student chooses a specific topic for in-depth 
study. 
Nemer MW 12 -1:15 Fall 



59 



Historical Studies 

V. SELECTED TOPICS 

BTS H-349 

Research Methods in Church History 

Practical training in research techniques and 
sharpening of the critical spirit through guid- 
ance on individual projects. 
Durnbaugh T 3:10 -5:55 Fall 

THEOLOGY 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 

FOUNDATIONAL 

DIT T-300 

Revelation and the Response in Faith 

This course centers on the nature and the 
various explanations of revelation and the 
response in faith; on the inter-relationship 
existing between scripture, tradition and the 
magisterium; the nature and irreformability of 
dogma. The course is taught in such a way as to 
introduce the student to strict theological 
methodology and to acquaint him with the 
problematic of theological understanding and 
expression. 
Staff MWF 10:10 -11 Fall 

MTS T-301 

Introduction to Theology: Theological 

Reflection 

An introduction to the study of theology as the 
reasoned endeavor to understand the reality of 
human life in the world from the perspective of 
Christian faith in God. Fundamental Theology 
deals with issues of revelation, faith in God, 
religious experience, and symbolism. Recom- 
mended for all first-year students. 
Parker TTh 10 -11:50 Fall 

LSTC T-310 
Introduction to Theology 

An introduction to the nature of theology as an 
academic discipline and as the exposition of a 
faith perspective. Readings in major recent 
theologians, with special attention to the 
question of methodology. May be sectioned in 
accordance with students' previous background. 
Sherman, Pero TTh 11 - 12:15 Fall 

LSTC T-310C 
Introduction to Theology 

This course is an orientation to the theological 
task, its sources, the criteria for its study, the 



Theological Studies 

methods used in studying theology. It is an ex- 
ploration of the relations theology has with 
other sciences and disciplines. It is also a study 
of the relation between faith and theology, con- 
sidering the role authorities and experience have 
in its study. And finally, it is a study of the 
nature of theological language, and the current 
context of theology in today's world among 
Christians. This course can be taken in either 
English or Spanish. 
Navarro TTh 11-12:15 Fall 

LSTC T-310C 

Introduccion a la Teologia (Introduction to 

Theology) 

Este curso es una orientacion a la tarea teologica 
sus fuentes, los criterios que guian su estudio, 
los metodos que se emplean en el teologizar. Se 
exploran las relaciones que la teologia tiene con 
otras ciencias y disciplinas. Se estudia la 
relacion entre la fe y la teologia, el papel que 
juegan las autoridades en su estudio y la ex- 
periencia. Se trata la naturaleza del lenguaje 
teologica, y el contexto actual de la teologia en 
el mundo cristiano. El curso puede tomarse en 
ingles o en espanol, por separado. 
Navarro TTh 11 -12:15 Fall 

CTU T-325A, B 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study 
of several case histories. Special emphasis on the 
historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of the faith-community in 
relation to shifting horizons. 
Hayes Sec. A : MW 12-1:15 Fall 

TBAr Sec. B: MW 10:30 -11:45 Fall 

Linnan MW 12 -1:15 Winter 

CTS TEC-305 

Constructive Theology II 

The systematic formulation of the student's own 

theological position is the major task. 

LeFevre TTh 11 -12:20 Fall 

LSTC T-311 
Christian Theology I 

Survey and interpretation of basic Christian 
doctrine. The full range of Christian doctrine, 
from creation to eschatology, is dealt with in 
this and the following course, Christian 
Theology II (T-312) offered the subsequent 
quarter. Although each course forms an in- 
dependent unit, the two courses are inter-related 



60 



Theological Studies 



to constitute a total sequence. Students in- 
terested in taking only one of the courses should 
consult with the instructor. Prerequisite: LSTC 
T-310 or equivalent. 

Braaten MWF 11 - 11 : 50 Fall 

Hefner TTh 11 -12:15 Fall 

NBTS C-353 

Christian Theology: Issues and Approaches 

An introduction to the way in which Christians 
have attempted to support, clarify, and com- 
municate their faith in various past and present 
situations. Traditional arguments for and 
against God's existence will be discussed. An in- 
troduction to basic theologians and issues in 
Enlightment, liberal, and neo-Orthodox 
theologies will follow. 
Finger TTh 8 -9:20 Fall 

II. PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

CTS TEC-361 
Dynamics of the Sacred 

Fundamental phenomenology and psychology 
of religion will be read for insights into the con- 
temporary meaning of uniquely religious 
vocation and leadership. Readings will include 
Otto, Eliade, Jung and others who focus on the 
human encounter with the sacred. 
Moore TTh 11 -12:20 Fall 

NBTS C-454 

Recent Theological Thought 

The course will begin with the "neo-orthodox" 
revolution against liberal theology in the early 
decades of this century. From there it will move 
to more recent theologies of history, process 
and liberation, including contemporary trends 
in Roman Catholic theology. 
Finger WF 2:10 -3:30 Fall 

NBTS M-468 

Black Churches and Black Theologies 

A seminar which examines the African roots 
and the American development of Black 
congregations and analyzes and critiques the 
contemporary Black theology of James Cone, 
Major Jones, and J. Deotis Roberts. 
Blanford M7- 9:30 p.m. Fall 



III. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS 

MTS T-419 

The Theology of Schleiermacher 

A seminar on the major theological writings of 
Friedrich Schleiermacher, with a focus on the 
issues of theological method and constructive 
reinterpretation of Christian doctrines in his 
work. Includes an assessment of his con- 
tributions to liberal theology. 
Parker F 9 -11:50 Fall 

NBTS C-446 

Reconsidering the Social Gospel 

A study of the leading theological themes of the 
"social gospel" movement, especially those of 
Walter Rauschenbusch. Students will become 
acquainted with the social situation and with 
one other major thinker of the times, largely 
through readings of their choice. As a final 
project, students will develop their own 
theology on several basic issues in dialogue with 
Rauschenbusch and in light of the contemporary 
social situation. 
Finger T 2:10 -4:45 Fall 

BTS T-452 

Theology of Karl Barth 

An inductive study of representative writings. 

Principal readings will be in the Church 

Dogmatics. 

Groff W 2:10 -4:55 Fall 

CTU T-494 

The Spiritual Theology of Karl Rahner 

The basic insights of the structure and method 
of Karl Rahner's theology are presented as roots 
of his spiritual theology. This spiritual theology 
is then exemplified through an investigation of 
selected spirituality issues. 
Szura TTh 12 -1:15 Fall 

LSTC T-631 

Three Metaphysical Systems for Theology 

This seminar will survey, for the purposes of 
comparison and contrast, the philosophical 
systems of Whitehead, Hegel, and Heidegger, 
devoting three sessions to each philosopher and 
one session each to a theologian who had adopt- 



61 



Theological Studies 



ed one of the philosophers as a resource for 
theological thought. Each student will be asked 
to prepare thoroughly on one philosopher and 
theologian, and write a final paper that 
discusses at least two of the philosophers. An 
extra evening session will be arranged. 
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor; ability to 
read materials in German; Prior acquaintance 
with some of the materials; Limit 12 students 
(including auditors). 
Hefner M 7 - 10 p.m. Fall 

IV. MAJOR TOPICS IN THEOLOGY 

CTU T-540 

Theology of the Trinity 

A study of Trinitarian thought in Christian 
tradition focusing on Augustine, Bonaventure, 
and Aquinas. Requirement for admission: T- 
430 or equivalent. 

Hayes MW3-4:15 Fall 

DIT T-422 
Christology 

Interpretation of the Incarnation and Redemp- 
tion. The course surveys New Testament 
Christology, historical development and 
dogmatic pronouncements, traditional and con- 
temporary theology. Drawing on personal study 
and group discussion, each student is asked to 
compose a christological statement for our day. 
Staff MW 1-2:30 Fall 

CTU 1-439 
Christology 

A two-quarter, team-taught course on the 
mystery of Christ. The first quarter will con- 
centrate on the problems of Christology in the 
New Testament. The second quarter will treat 
the development of Christology in the history of 
Conciliar theology and in systematic theology. 
Enrollment for two quarters mandatory: 3 
credits per quarter (applicable to CTU M.Div. 
synoptic and doctrinal requirements). 
Hayes/Senior MW 9 -10:15 Fall 

Hayes/Senior MW 9 - 10:15 Winter 

DIT T-533 
Eschatology 

This course will explore the nature and 
significance of eschatology in Scripture and 
recent theology. The theology of time and 
history; the relationship of divine and human 
providence; hope; "the last things" will be 



examined. The method of instruction will be 

seminar. 

Minogue M Fall 

MTS T-415 

The Ecumenical Vision 

This course seeks to acquaint the student with 
the vision of the Christian Church as a single, 
yet diversified and interdependent, global 
reality which exists in the world as a sign of the 
future unity and fulfillment of humankind. This 
theme is developed historically and 
systematically, drawing upon selected docu- 
ments of ecumenical meetings from the Edin- 
burgh Missionary Conference of 1910 through 
the Second Vatican Council to the 1979 World 
Council of Churches Conference on Faith, 
Science and the Future at M.I.T. Attention will 
be given to ecumenical opportunities now 
before the United Presbyterian and other 
protestant churches, including the Consultation 
on Church Union, the UPCUSA/PCUS union 
plan, and the participation of our churches in 
shared strategy formation for partnership in 
world mission. A seminar course. 
Mudge T 2- 4:50 Fall 

CTU T-450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical 
development of the eucharistic liturgy, with par- 
ticular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of 
eucharist in light of the above and of con- 
temporary discussion. Consideration of current 
questions, e.g., ecumenical questions of in- 
tercommunion and eucharistic ministry. 
Ostdiek MW 10:30 - 11:45 Fall 

Keifer TTh 10:30-11:45 Win ter 

MTS T-402 

Baptism and Eucharist 

A study of the Christian doctrines of baptism 
and eucharist with emphasis on critical analysis 
of various issues now in controversy. Attention 
will be given to the liturgical implications of 
various theological outlooks. 
Burkhart TTh 10-11:50 Fall 

DIT T-590 
Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects are offered under 
this rubric. Consult professor for topic in which 
you are interested. Offered in response to 
student interest. 
Staff TBAr Upon request 



62 



Theological Studies 



V. CHRISTIANITY AND 
THE WORLD 

CTU T-430 

The Problem of God and Contemporary Society 

An analysis of why God has become 
problematic for contemporary people is 
followed by a critical review of representative 
Christian attempts to respond to this problem. 
The course seeks to help the student evaluate his 
or her own religious experience and respond in- 
telligently to the modern problem of God. 
Linnan MW 10:30 - 11:45 Fall 

Hayes MW 1:30 -2:45 Winter 

CTS TEC-500 
Interpretation 

A seminar examining diverse modes of 
theological interpretation aiming at developing 
skills in relating theological perspectives to the 
concrete human situation. Permission of in- 
structor required. 
LeFevre W 2- 5p.m. Fall 

LSTC T-450 

Senior Seminar I: Theology and the Church's 

Ministry 

An integrative course dealing with the role of 
theology in pastoral formation and functioning. 
For seniors at LSTC; admission of others by ap- 
proval of instructor. 
Braaten TTh 11 -12:15 Fall 



CCTS T-472 

Communicating the Religious Message in an 

Age of Science ^^^ 



In this course the following goals will guide the 
study: (1) to introduce students to theologies 
and theologians which seek explicitly to address 
the contemporary scientific and technological 
worldview; (2) to acquaint students with basic 
work in philosophy of science and theological 
methodology which are relevant to such 
theological address; and (3) to assist students 
who are already familiar with matters represen- 
ted by goals (1) and (2) further to advance their 
understandings in these and/or related areas. In 
approaching such goals two methods will be 
emphasized: (1) individual tutorial sessions 
which will help the student to advance at 
his/her own pace, to deal with new per- 
spectives, and to prepare a research paper; and 
(2) seminar sessions which will deal with 
readings corresponding to the first two goals 



mentioned above. Readings in theology may in- 
clude issues such as those raised in Peacocke's 
Science and the Christian Experiment, Teilhard 
de Chardin's Pnomenon of Man, Cobb's A 
Christian Natural Theology, as well as those 
treated in selected works of the convenors. 
Readings in the methodology and philosophy of 
science may include issues such as those dealt 
with in Gilkey's Religion and the Scientific 
Future, Barbour's Issues in Science and Religion, 
Kuhn's The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, 
Margenau's Open Vistas. Prerequisites: at least 
two courses in systematic or philosophical 
theology, and approval of the convenors. Scien- 
tific background helpful but not necessary. 
Burhoe/Hefner TBAr Fall 



CCTS T-572 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and the 

Sciences 



The seminar is designed as a forum for papers 
by theological and scientific faculty and ad- 
vanced students. It seeks to move toward a 
theology which is solidly grounded in the best 
of today's scientific understandings and which 
at the same time may be dynamic in eliciting 
religious feelings and behavior characteristic of 
the best Christian tradition whereby persons are 
led to appreciate the reality of God's sovereign- 
ty and grace which are manifest in environing 
nature and in human forms, and to find thereby 
a new meaning, hope, sense of duty, and 
beatific perspective in God's realm. 
Each weekly session will be the occasion for the 
presentation and critical evaluation of one or 
more papers exploring an interpretation of 
historic religous doctrines in the light of the 
sciences. Among the historic religious doctrines 
that may be interpreted are such primary 
Christian categories as God, Creation, Human 
Nature, Sin, Salvation, Church, Revelation, and 
Mission to the World. No specific topic is ex- 
cluded per se, no matter how out of theological 
favor it may presently be or how seemingly in- 
congruous with recent secular doctrine. For the 
seminar, the light of the sciences will be sought 
primarily through focus upon the so-called 
"hard" sciences that have provided a new world 
view or "metaphysics." These sciences include, 
physics, biology, sociobiology, and 
psychobiology. However, this primary focus 
does not exclude perspectives from the 
psychosocial sciences, which will also be heavily 
involved. At the core of this activity the 



63 



Theological Studies 



Ethical Studies 



seminar will explore and test a basic hypothesis: 
that recent scientific information suggests that 
evolving psychobiological and sociobiological 
systems require religions as value cores, that the 
traditonal religion of each culturetype has been 
selected for the same kinds of life-producing 
wisdom as have been selected in the genotypes 
for all animal organisms and societies, and that 
all of this is generated and selected by a creative 
system of dynamic reality for transcending any 
of its creatures. 

Admission for credit: While the seminar is ex- 
pected primarily to involve the presentation of 
papers by faculty and advanced students, ad- 
mission for credit is also open to other students 
whose background in theology and science is 
deemed satisfactory by the convenors. High per- 
formance in CCTS T-472 may be deemed suf- 
ficient for admission, and capacity to discuss 
critically and to advance themes such as those 
published in Zygon, journal of Religion and 
Science would provide excellent grounding for 
any participants in the seminar. 
Admission without credit: Participation is also 
open to Cluster students and faculty who have a 
concern to become more informed about and/ or 
to participate in this research and development 
program without obligating themselves to meet 
the specific course requirements. Such persons 
should inform one of the conveners in advance 
of the intention to participate in this manner. 
Requirements for students taking the seminar 
for credit will be (1) to present an original paper 
of some 20-30 doublespaced pages (during one 
of the last five weeks of the quarter) on a. topic 
approved by the convenors and to defend it suc- 
cessfully during its discussion, and (2) to present 
a one or two-page critical and constructive 
analysis of the proceedings of each of the other 
papers and discussions in the seminar sessions. 
Sessions held at home of Dr. Burhoe, 1524 E. 
59th St., Chicago. 
Burhoe /Hefner TBAr Fall 

VI. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU T-301 

Structures of Religious Experience : 

The Great Traditions 

A study of the structures of sacred time and 
space, ritual, asceticism, meditation and 
mysticism as a means for experiencing the 
sacred in self and society. Emphasis will be 



placed on the concrete manifestations of these 

structures in the world religions. 

Schreiter MW 9 - 10:15 Fall 

DIT T-301 

Horizons of Spirituality 

This course seeks to provide entering students 
with an understanding of the various dynamics 
of the spiritual life as experienced by Christians 
today. The patterns of human and Christian 
development are studied with an emphasis on 
the nature of commitment. Likewise, some pat- 
terns of spirituality in the history of the Church, 
including contemporary priestly, religious, and 
lay spirituality, are examined. Enrollment is 
limited to DeAndreis students only. 
Staff TWF 10:10-11 Fall 

NBTS C-352 

Prayer and Theology 

This course is intended to introduce the student 
to the theology and practice or prayer. 
Christian prayer is essentially petitionary, 
therefore it is this mode which will receive the 
most attention. Still, there will be a section 
dealing with meditative/contemplative prayer. 
The course will be structured around a two-fold 
thesis: a) prayer needs theology, and b) 
theology needs prayer. 
Piippo M 7 - 9:00 p.m. Fall 

NBTS C-546 
The Christian Life 

An inquiry into some of the major Protestant 
perspectives of, and experiences in, the 
Christian life with the expectation that an 
analysis, comparison, and evaluation of these 
perspectives will strengthen and enrich the 
student's own Christian life. An open and 
vigorous exchange of views is encouraged. 
Ohlmann M 1:10 -3:40 Fall 

ETHICAL STUDIES 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC E-310A 
Christian Ethics 

A study of the elements of ethical reflection, 
with special.attention to the theological ethics of 
Reinhold Niebuhr and the philosophical ethics 
of John Rawls and their application to personal 
and social issues. 
Benne MW 2:30 - 3:45 Fall 



64 



Ethical Studies 



MTS E-313 

Introduction to Christian Ethics 

This is an elementary course in Christian ethics. 
It seeks to familiarize the student with the 
vocabulary and analytical instruments of dif- 
ferentiation and clarification used in 
philosophical and theological ethics. It also 
seeks to familiarize the student with some of the 
substantive issues which concern Christian 
ethicists. 
Garcii MW7-9p.m. Fall 

M/L E-431 

Religious Ethics: James Luther Adams 

Introduction to the systematic study of religious 
ethics through a comparison of major con- 
temporary theological and philosophical per- 
spectives in socio-historical context. 
Engel TBAr Fall 

II. THE BIBLE, THE CHURCH 
AND ETHICS 

DIT B-541 

The Bible and Ethics 

A seminar examining the Biblical basis of ethical 
studies. The course will investigate two foci: the 
legal tradition and the wisdom tradition. 
Materials will be taken from both Old 
Testament and the New Testament. 
Prerequisites: B-442-443; B-450-451; B-415 or 
similar courses. 
Fischer T Fall 

CTU E-379 

Christian Ethics : The Moral Agent 

An introductory study of the place of an agent- 
centered morality and of the notion of virtue 
within Christian ethics. Major areas of con- 
centration include Thomas Aquinas and the 
contemporary virtue approach of Hauerwas. 
This approach will then be contrasted with 
other contemporary methods in order to ascer- 
tain its significance for moral decision making. 
Nairn MW3-4:15 Fall 

Nairn MW 12-1: 15 Spring 

III. MORAL THEOLOGY 

DIT E-531 

St. Thomas on Human Acts 

This will be a reading course in the first forty- 
eight questions of the first part of the second 



book of the Summa Theologica. These 
questions cover the ultimate end of man, his 
volitional process, and his emotions. The basic 
methodology of the course will be reading and 
discussion. 



Minogue 



W 



Fall 



DIT E-541 Method in Ethics 

This seminar seeks to explore four basic 
methods in ethics. The first will be Aristotle's, 
gained through a reading of the Nicomachean 
Ethics. Kant's Foundations of the Metaphysics 
of Morals will be the second. Nietzsche's In- 
sights into "ressentiment" will be explored in his 
On the Genealogy of Morals. Finally, one of the 
representatives of the utilitarian school will be 
read. 
Minogue Th Fall 

CTU E-588 

The Mystery of Christ and Moral Structures 

The course is designed to study the implications 
of Christology for moral theology, for a Church 
whose claim to be the "universal sacrament of 
salvation" is being challenged by an increasingly 
secular, scientific, culturally and religiously 
pluralistic world. The main works for this study 
will be the relevant works of Catholic and other 
Christian moralists. Attention will be given also 
to non-Christian secular and religious authors 
The moral structures in question are issues such 
as: good and evil, law and conscience, freedom 
and responsibility, community and grace, 
history and salvation. Fundamental Christology 
and Ecclesiology are prerequisite for the course. 
Fornasari MW 9 -10:15 Fall 

IV. SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

NBTS C-558 
Social Ethics 

A panoramic historico-theological analysis of 
some of the most important socio-ethical 
thinkers and movements in the Christian 
tradition. Attention will be given to thinkers 
and movements of critical contestative in- 
tentionality as expressions of the subversive 
character of Christian faith. Emphasis will be on 
the student's critical investigation of such ten- 
dencies, in relation to central contemporary 
social issues for later exposition and discussion 
in class. Prerequisite: Theological Ethics or 
equivalent. 
Mottesi WF 10 : 40 - 12 Fall 



65 



Ethical Studies 



World Mission Studies 



CTU E-570 

Theology of Revolution 

An examination of various definitions of 
revolution as they have emerged in the classical 
Western revolutions. An extended look at 
current revolutionary theology as it has 
emerged from Latin American sources. Course 
requirements: participation in class discussion, 
take home exam or term paper of about 20 
pages. 
Pawlikowski MW 1:30 -2:45 Fall 

CTU E-590 

Contemporary Social Problems 

An examination from a theological and ethical 
perspective of several key problems in con- 
temporary global society. Special attention will 
be given to technological, ecological, food and 
population developments insofar as they impact 
upon current Christian responsibility for world 
society. 
Pawlikowski TTh 10:30 -11:45 Fall 

V. SEXUALITY 

LSTC E-430 

Christian Sexual Ethics 

in Cross-Cultural Perspective 

An examination from a Christian moral point of 
view of significant sexual issues that face 
Christian persons today — abortion, 

homosexuality, pre-marital sexual relations, 
sexual fidelity in marriage, family life, etc. This 
course will fulfill the Christian ethics 
requirement at LSTC. The course will be co- 
taught by Bjorn Bjornsson, Professor of 
Christian Ethics at the University of Iceland and 
a recognized authority in Scandinavian family 
and sexual life, and Robert Benne. 
Bjornsson, Benne T 2:30 -5 Fall 

VI. SELECTED TOPICS IN ETHICS 

MTS E-433 
Seminar in Ethics 

In alternate years, the seminar will address 
issues of current importance, with focus on con- 
temporary sources for reflection, and persons of 
importance in the area of Christian ethical 
thought. In 1981-82, the seminar will focus on 
the ethical thought of Dietrich Bonhoeffer. 
Stotts T 2-4:50 Fall 

LSTC E-510 

Basic Issues in Biomedical Ethics 



A survey of the fundamental problems posed 
for Christian ethics by recent developments in 
the biological sciences and in medical practice. 
Source readings and case studies. Prerequisite: 
E-310 or equivalent. 
Sherman M 7 - 10 Fall 

DIT E-590 

Directed Reading on Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects are offered under 
this rubric. Consult professor for topic in which 
you are interested. Offered in response to 
student interest. 
Minoguc TBAr Upon Request 



WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

I. THEOLOGY, FOUNDATIONS, 
AND DYNAMICS OF MISSION 



CCTS 1-560 (1 or 3 full courses) 

Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive 



The Intensive has a double major thrust which 
will serve the needs and goals of a wide variety 
of students. On the one hand, it will give high 
priority to those students who desire to work or 
study in another cultural environment and will 
help them acquire beginning levels of com- 
petence for effective communication in cultures 
and subcultures other than their own. At the 
same time, the concentration will provide a 
wider range of students the opportunity to ex- 
perience in a unique way the cultural assump- 
tions and limits of their theological thinking, 
and to lay the foundation for a broader in- 
ternational, interracial and ecumenical un- 
derstanding, concern and commitment both in 
their theological education as well as in their 
further ministry. Credit for 1 or 3 full courses 
by arrangement of instructors. 
Barbour/ Boberg MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Fall 
Sept. 28 - Oct. 21 
(plus some week-end experiences) 

II. MISSION IN PARTICULAR 
SITUATIONS 

LSTC W-310 

World Mission and Evangelization: History, 

Theology and Practice 

An introduction to the background and con- 
temporary practice of mission and 
evangelization seen as the ecumenical task of the 
church on all six continents. Parish programs of 



66 



Ministry Studies 



World Mission Studies 



mission education and motivation are also con- 
sidered. 
Scherer TF 1-2:15 Fall 

LSTC W-426 
World Religions 

A phenomenological study of world religion 
with particular attention to the resources 
available in History of Religion. For students 
who have not had a college level course in 
world religions, a survey of the major world 
religions will be included. For students who 
have had such a course, attention will be direc- 
ted to specific religions or religious phenomena 
in which there is special interest. 
Lindberg T 7 - 10 p.m. Fall 



reflection; to provide the student with the per- 
spective on the nature, history and practice of 
ministry in Christian vocation. Open to stu- 
dents other than CTS with permission of the in- 
structors. 
Moore MW 3:40 -5 p.m. Fall 

NBTS M-362 

Introduction to Urban Ministry 

This course is designed to introduce the essential 
features of the modern industrial world class 
city and the nature and mission of the church in 
this setting. A range of urban church models, 
issues, resources and leadership styles of the 
church will be examined. 
Bakke WF 2:10 -3:30 Fall 



III. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MISSION 

CTU W-430 
Cultural Orientation 

A guided reading course open only to CTU 
students engaged in CCTS 1-560: Cross- 
Cultural Communication. The course provides 
guided readings in the social, historical, political 
and religious background of the country for 
which the student is preparing. 
Staff TBAr Fall 

CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 

This seminar is limited to students returning 
from a cross-cultural program. Building on their 
recent experience and present re-enculturation 
process, this seminar will help the participants 
to recognize the particular dynamics of the re- 
enculturation process and through group sup- 
port and critique to use these dynamics to in- 
tegrate and further develop their Christian com- 
mitment, ministerial identity, and missionary 
formation. 

Barbour /Staff Th 9 -10:15 Fall 

Barbour /Staff Th 9 -10:15 Winter 



II. MINISTRY, CHURCH 
AND SOCIETY 

MTS M-301 

The Contexts of Ministry 

The course will examine the varied theologies of 
Christian faith as articulated in a wide range of 
ministries throughout the metropolitan area. 
Students will study and experience a spectrum 
of Christian witness from denominational 
"cathedrals" to storefront congregations; from 
urban immigrant, ethnic, and racial enclaves to 
high mobility congregations in the suburbs; 
from the occult and withdrawn to the politically 
active — all in the name of Jesus Christ. Intended 
for incoming students, the course provides an 
in-depth introduction to faculty, and a 
framework for study of theology and ministry. 
One unit of credit for all three quarters. 
Armendariz & F 2- 3:30 Fall, Winter, 

Other Faculty Spring 

III. CHURCH ORGANIZATION, 

ADMINISTRATION AND 

GROWTH 



MINISTRY: ITS NATURE 

AND PRACTICE 
I. THE NATURE OF MINISTRY 

CTS CM-300 

The Practice of Christian Ministry 

A course to assist the student in experiencing 
and initiating a style of pastoral and theological 



MTS M-317 

Community Organization As A Church 

Concern 

This course will explore organizing concepts of 
the dynamics of power; strategy development, 
leadership development and negotiation. This 
exploration will be in relation to the breadth and 
scope of religious institutions and their religious 
impact and social consequences on the Latino 



67 



Ministry Studies 



Pastoral Care 



Community. The role model will be San Lucas 

United Church of Christ. 

Morales TBA Fall 

CTU M-431 

Values, Policy and the American 

Parish Community 

An analysis of the American parish as a com- 
munity institution; the impact of social class, 
neighborhood and community patterns; the ar- 
ticulation of a parish policy of spiritual develop- 
ment; comparison with Government policy for 
population and with corporation personnel 
policy. 
Kelly TThl2-l:15 Fall 

MTS M-307 
Preparing for Ministry 

Students are prepared for thinking and acting 
effectively in the various church structures they 
enter. Special attention is given to the relation 
between policy, politics and church life. 
Presbyterian students will receive specific 
assistance in relation to Standard Ordination 
Examinations in polity and worship. Attention 
is also given to the process of seeking a call to a 
position in the church. Recommended for 
Seniors. Half course. 
Worley M 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

PASTORAL CARE 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

DIT M-365 

Perspectives in Pastoral Care 

This course provides an interdisciplinary in- 
troduction and review of theological and 
historical perspectives in pastoral care, the 
pastoral relationship, ministerial identity, and 
pastoral care skills. The student participates as 
both recipient and provider of pastoral care and 
presents an initial concept of pastoral care. 
Ulrich & Staff MWF8-.10-9 Fall 

II. PASTORAL COUNSELING 

CTU M-300 

Symbol, Image and Feeling in Religious 

Development 

The course will explore the relationship between 
symbol, image and feeling and how their in- 
terdependence influences the living out of one's 
faith at the various stages of religious develop- 



ment. 
Arnold 



T 1:30 



Fall 



CTU M-406 

Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A prerequisite for this offering is CTU M-405, 
or equivalent. The course is a practicum; with 
emphasis on reality practice roleplay, relative to 
specific types of pastoral counseling situations. 
Follow-up is offered in the form of evaluation 
sessions. Verbatim reports will also be required, 
and evaluation will be given in both individual 
and group sessions. Audio-visual fee. 
Mallonee MW 9 -10:15 Fall 

Mallonee TTh9-10:15 Spring 

CTU M-405 

Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

A basic introduction to the principles, methods, 
and techniques of pastoral counseling. Charac- 
teristics of an effective counseling relationship; 
the initial interview and assessment; and use of 
referral are some areas discussed. Considerable 
time is spent outside of class developing coun- 
seling skills and techniques by taping reality 
practice role play with peer and in evaluation 
sessions with the instructors. Limited 
enrollment: 15. Audio-visual fee. 
Mallonee TTh9-10:15 Fall 

Mallonee MW 9- 10:15 Winter 

Mallonee MW 9-10: 15 Spring 

MTS M-428 

The Future of Pastoral Theology : 

Definition of a Discipline 

The nature of the discipline which encompasses 
pastoral care and pastoral counseling is not 
always apparent. It may seem as if the discipline 
is defined by psychological categories. This 
course explores the possiblity of a constructive 
discipline which dialogues with ethics, 
spirituality, worship and liturgy and community 
and makes theological contributions. The course 
will also explore sexual dynamics as they affect 
the shaping and practice of the discipline. For- 
mat: Professor will be "in residence" for two 
one-week intensive periods (October and 
December). Class will be convened periodically 
between these weeks by Professor Jarvis. 
Way TBA Fall 

CTU M-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

Readings in the Great Books. This full year 
three credit course is an opportunity for the 



68 



Pastoral Care 



student to read and discuss for theological and 
pastoral value the great books of psychology. A 
bibliography of selected classics in psychology 
will be available in the spring at pre-registration 
for fall quarter. The course members will meet 
for discussion ten times during the school year. 
Permission of instructor is required. 
Szura TBAr Fall 

Szura TBAr Winter 

Szura TBAr Spring 

LSTC M-520 

Group Dynamics and Group Therapy 

Emphasis upon the learning and therapeutic ex- 
perience amidst the dynamic interactions and in- 
terpersonal relationship of an ongoing group 
situation. Psychological and theological reflec- 
tion as well as a consideration of com- 
munication theory. Requirements include out- 
side reading and final evaluation. Prerequisite: 
LSTC M-320 or equivalent. 
Swanson MW 8 - 9:30 a.m. Fall 

NBTS M-597 

Group Counseling and Psychotherapy 

The pastor will never be able to cover the coun- 
seling needs of his congregation only through 
individual counseling. The course is designed to 
help students understand the dynamics of group 
counseling and therapy and its importance in 
the pastoral ministry. The course will study 
group interaction and the many ways in which 
these can be used in the church structure. 
During part of the course the student will be 
assigned to a group and report the development 
of the group's progress. Prerequisite: Fun- 
damentals of Counseling. 
Taylor TTh 11 -12:15 Fall 

III. SELECTED TOPICS IN 
PASTORAL CARE 

CTS TEC-361 
Dynamics of the Sacred 

Fundamental phenomenology and psychology 
of religion will be read for insights into the con- 
temporary meaning of uniquely religious 
vocation and leadership. Readings will iclude 
Otto, Eliade, Jung and others who focus on the 
human encounter with the sacred. 
Moore TTh 11 -12:20 Fall 



CTS CM-451 

Gestalt Therapy and Religious Experience 

An exploration and experiencing of Gestalt 
Therapy as one way of understanding con- 
temporary religous experience. 
Anderson M 6:30 -9:30 Fall 

CTU M-505 

Advanced Practicum in Pastoral Counseling 

Prerequisite: M-405, or equivalent. The prac- 
ticum requires enrollment for all three quarters. 
It consists of live counseling of high school 
students, with ongoing supervision on a weekly 
basis. By arrangement with the staff. Audio- 
visual fee. 
Mallonee TBAr Fall 

DIT M-556, 557, 558 
Pastoral Care of the Aged 

The course involves training in geriatric care. 
The program seeks to minister to the social and 
religious needs of the aged. 
Ulrich TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-471 

Group Process in the Life of the Church 

Intensive experience of group life and group 
process. Participation in group experience: ob- 
servation and reflection upon the process of 
group formation, life and dynamics, with ap- 
plication of group process to doctrine of 
Church. 
Schultz TBAr Fall 

BTS M-487 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

This course will focus on the social interaction 
of persons in primary relationships. We will 
study the theory of intimate relationships and 
learn the skills of problem-solving in marriage 
and family systems. We will work at 
theologizing within the concrete experiences of 
persons in their social systems. 
Poling TTh 8-9:20 Fall 

NBTS M-494 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

The need to know more about the marriage 
relationship and how to help couples is one of 
the major challenges the minister is facing 
today. Couples and pastors spend considerable 
time, energy, money and emotions in an at- 



69 



Pastoral Care 



Liturgy and Worship 



tempt to understand marital problems and how 
to solve them. Many times these efforts are un- 
successful. The course is designed to provide 
pastors, professionals and para-professionals 
with information concerning premarital coun- 
seling, and marital counseling. Considerable 
time will be spent on the major areas of the 
marriage relationship and the problems that 
arise within these areas. There will also be an 
examination of therapeutic methods as a means 
to enhance the marriage relationship. Divorce 
will be considered from a theological, 
psychological and sociological perspective. Pre- 
requisite: Fundamentals of Counseling. 
Taylor Th 7 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

DIT M-560, 561, 562 
Pastoral Care of the Family 

The course involves a series of training sessions 
in family counseling, and on-sight involvement 
with troubled families. The counselors work in 
mixed pairs so as to facilitate group interaction. 
Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 



CCTS M-591 Pastoral Care: 
History and Theology 



Se epp.Ashby 
140-1* 1 



12 noon 



Fall 



LITURGY AND WORSHIP 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

DIT M-330 

Introduction to Liturgical Studies 

This course focuses on a basic understanding of 
the meaning and fundamental elements of 
liturgy; it attempts to develop a working 
definition of liturgy. It also touches on these 
topics; music, and other art forms in liturgy, 
spirituality and liturgy, brief overview of 
history of liturgy and the liturgical year. 
Arceneaux TTh 9:10 - 10 Fall 

CTU T-350 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

A course designed to help the entering student 
explore and reflect more fully on key dimen- 
sions, forms, and principles of pastoral liturgy 
in the light of Vatican II. The exploration and 
reflection are carried out through practicum 
exercises, lectures, readings, and study projects. 
Students are to participate in three lab sessions 
on dates to be announced at the beginning of 
the course. Audio-visual fee. 



Os tdiek MW 1:30 -2:45 Fall 

Hughes Sec. A : MW 9-10: 15 Spring 

Keifer Sec. B: MW 1:30 - 2: 45 Spring 

II. LITURGICAL LEADERSHIP 



III. SACRAMENTS 

CTU T-455 
Initiation 

Beginning with the story of conversion/initia- 
tion as told in literary and personal accounts 
and in liturgical text (the Lenten Lectionary and 
the Rites of Initiation), this course moves to 
biblical, liturgical and theological reflection on 
the experience and sacraments of Christian 
initiation. 

Keifer TTh 10:30 - 11 -.45 Fall 

Ostdiek MW 1:30-2: 45 Winter 

CTU M-420 

Legal Aspects of the Sacraments 

A survey and practical application of Church 
legislation regarding the administration and 
reception of the sacraments. Particular emphasis 
on matrimonial law and practice. 
Bogdan MW3-4-.15 Fall 

Bogdan MW 3 - 4:15 Spring 

DIT M-464 

The Sacrament of Matrimony 

This course presents Catholic dogmatic teaching 
on matrimony with special attention given to 
developments in the theology of matrimony 
over the centuries, especially in recent times 
through the documents of Vatican II. An at- 
tempt is made to situate this study in the context 
of postconciliar ecclesiology, liturgy and 
spirituality. Substantive moral and pastoral im- 
plications of the dogmatic teaching are ex- 
plored. 
Prist MW8-.10-9 Fall 

DIT M-569 

Pastoral Aspects of Matrimony 

This course focuses on the process of helping to 
prepare a couple for the sacrament of 
matrimony from the time they call the priest or 
deacon to the wedding itself; time is spent 
researching and discussing resources such as 
diocesan guidelines, programs, films, books, 
etc. 
Arceneaux W Fall 



70 



Preaching and Communication 
IV. HISTORY OF LITURGY 

CTU M-461 

Liturgy of the Synagogue: Pattern and Practice 

A survey of liturgical forms in Jewish worship, 
the prayerbook, and the festal cycle. 
Perelmuter TTh 12-1: 15 Fall 

V. PRAYER 
VI. MUSIC 



VII. SELECTED TOPICS 

CTU T-550 

Area Studies in Worship: 

Great Books in Liturgy 

A seminar on classical works which have 
shaped this generation of liturgical studies. This 
three-hour seminar will meet once a month 
throughout the year, studying one book a 
month. 

Staff TBAr Fall 

Staff TBAr Winter 

Staff TBAr Spring 

DIT M-590 
Directed Research 

Topics determined in response to student in- 
terest. Enrollment is limited to DeAndreis 
students. 
Arceneaux TBAr Upon Request 

PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

I. FOUNDATIONAL COURSES 

MTS M-315 
Perspectives on Preaching 

This class will investigate the historical ground- 
ing and models that inform the task of 
preaching, struggle with the hermeneutical 
method and exegetical method that brings us to 
the text, and develop and critique our style of 
preaching on the basis of theological content, 
Biblical integrity, and personal presence. 
Preaching will be done in both lab and 
congregational contexts. 
Wardlaw/Jarvis MW 10 -11: 50 Fall 



Liturgy and Worship 

NBTS M-391 
Introduction to Preaching 

An introductory course looking at the history of 
preaching, addressing the nature and purpose of 
preaching, the various kinds of sermons, and 
sermon construction and delivery. Students will 
read and listen to sermons, learn to analyze ser- 
mons, prepare outlines for discussion in class, 
and deliver at least two sermons. Students' 
manuscript sermons and preached sermons are 
evaluated by the class. Sermons delivered in 
class are video-taped to help students improve 
their own preaching. 
Blanford T 2:10 -4:45 Fall 

CTU M-450A, B 

Preaching as Verbal Communication 

This is a first course for those who are to 
preach. The seminar and practicum will help 
each student discover his/her own com- 
munication skills in the oral reading and 
preaching of the Word of God. These skills are 
then put into practice by a process of ex- 
perimentation and exercise. Since each student 
enters the seminar at a different level of com- 
petence and experience, this first course en- 
courages a variety of preaching styles. Each 
student has the opportunity to use video-tape 
and preach before outside groups. Limited 
enrollment (5 per section). Audio-visual fee. 



Hughes 



Hughes 



Hughes 



A-B Seminar M 12 
A Lab M3- 5 
B Lab W 12 -2 

A-B Seminar M 12 
A Lab M3- 5 
B Lab W 12 -2 

A-B Seminar M 12 
A Lab M3-5 
B Lab W 12 -2 



Fall 



Winter 



Spring 



II. AREA STUDIES IN PREACHING 

MTS M-417 

Learning To Preach In Community 

This seminar concentrates on the role of the 
faith community in helping the preacher into the 
act of preaching. Through group interaction in 
the preparation and delivery of sermons, 
students are encouraged to identify and utilize 
personal gifts in embodying the sermon for the 
empowerment of the community. Videotape is 
used extensively in the learning process. At- 



a 



71 



Preaching and Communication 



Educational Ministry 



tention is also given to oral interpretation in 

Scripture reading. (Limited to 8 students per 

quarter) Half credit per quarter. 

Wardlaw T 2-4:50 Fall 

TBA Winter 

TBA Spring 

LSTC M-540 

Language of Preaching: Shared Story 

A seminar to investigate the language form, and 
theological implications of story. Readings will 
include stories of the rabbis, short stories, and 
autobiographical stories. Students will compose 
and share stories dealing with selected ex- 
periences and theological themes. For LSTC 
Seniors only. Admission by approval of in- 
structor. 
Niedenthal TTh 8:30 -9:45 Fall 

LSTC M-452 
Christianity and Tragedy 

A seminar which probes the relationship be- 
tween a tragic sense and vision of life and a 
Christian one, and the bearing of this relation- 
ship on the theological understanding and 
Christian proclamation. Basic readings are 
dramatic works of tragedy and selected sermons 
of Paul Tillich. Limited enrollment; admission 
by approval of instructor. 
Niedenthal T 2:30 -5 Fall 

EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC M-360 

Educational Ministry (Teaching Parish) 

The basic course in Religious Education is in- 
tended to expose the student to philosophies, 
theology, curriculum, methodologies, and 
possibilities in the overall area of parish 
education. On the basis of these responses and 
individual past experiences, the student will be 
expected to engage in projects involving actual 
practice in the field plus steps to formulate his 
or her own philosophy and creativity. 
Bozeman TTh 8:30- 9:45 Fall 

CTU M-463 

Resources in Religious Education 

A series of workshops devoted to catechetical 
resources, planning and teaching methods, and 
catechist formation for pre-birth/pre-baptism 



catechesis for parents; pre-school/young child 
catechesis; sacramental preparation: youth, 
young adult, adult and senior citizen ongoing 
faith formation and catechesis. Each workshop 
provides an assessment of available materials 
and teaching methods. Attention will be given 
to ways of setting up programs, recruitment of 
catechists and catechist aides. Workshops are 
biweekly over the fall and winter quarters. 
Lucinio Th 10: 30-1 Fall 

Lucinio Th 10:30-1 Winter 

II. ADMINISTRATION 
AND METHODS 

NBTS M-384 

Group Process in the Church 

A study of research in group process and sen- 
sitivity training is utilized to understand in- 
terpersonal relationships and effective small 
group leadership. The class becomes a training 
group for understanding the group process. 
Jenkins T 7 -9:30 p.m. Fall 

MTS M-411 

Learning Theory and Church Education 

A critical examination of prominent learning 
theories in relation to the theory and practice of 
teaching in the church. 
Priester MW4-5-.50 Fall 

MTS M-412 

Models of Teaching in the Church 

A study of a variety of models of teaching with 
special attention to the theoretical bases and 
projected usefulness in the church. 
Priester T 7 -9:50 p.m. Fall 

III. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
AND THE LIFE CYCLE 

NBTS M-381 

The Teaching Ministry of the Church 

The course aims to develop an understanding of 
the biblical, theological, psychological, 
philosophical, and socio-cultural foundations 
for educational ministry of the church. Practice 
for educational ministry of the church. Practice 
teaching and reflection take place in small 
groups. 
Jenkins TTh 11 -12:15 Fall 



72 



Educational Ministry 



Supervised Ministry 



BTS M-398 

The Development of Conscience 

A consideration of the biblical doctrine of con- 
science in comparison with various con- 
temporary views of the development of moral 
judgment, especially those of Piaget, Erikson, 
and Freud. The course focuses upon the stages 
of moral development and pathology as well as 
the implications of such development for the 
educational and pastoral care programs of the 
church. 
Miller TTH 11-12:20 Fall 

MTS M-407 
Intergenerational Education 

An examination of the resources, times, and 
ways of planning for education which involves 
two or more age groups (younger children, 
older children, youth, young adults, adults). We 
will look at the advantages of intergenerational 
educational experiences to include a variety of 
ages. Congregational settings as well as family 
groups will be considered. 
Wehrheim F 9 -11:50 Fall 

NBTS M-486 

Ministry through Discipled Adults 

The renewed emphasis upon the ministry of the 
laity is bringing out a new emphasis upon 
discipling adults for effective ministry. Thus, 
this course shows the rationale and practice of 
successful programs as well as the catalytic role 
of the professional ministry. 
Morris TBAr Fall 

DIT M-584 

Practicum in Catechesis to High School 

Students 

This course involves the student in ten weeks of 
classroom teaching and preparation, planning 
and involvement in weekly liturgical 
celebrations, and outside activities with the 
High School students. The D.A.R.E. program 
meets the requirements for credit. The course 
may be enrolled in more than once, and may ex- 
tend over more than one-quarter. This course is 
open only to DeAndreis Students. 
Staff TBAr Every Quarter 

DIT M-585 

Practicum in Catechesis to Special 

Education Students 

This course involves the student in ten weeks of 
preparation and teaching of special education 
students. The program also involves a com- 



mitment to liturgical and recreational activities 
with the students. The Spred program meets the 
requirements for credit. The course may be 
enrolled in more than once, and may extend 
over more than one quarter. This course is open 
only to DeAndreis students. 
Staff TBAr Every Quarter 

IV. PERSPECTIVES ON 
EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 

NBTS M-381H 

The Educational Ministry of the 

Hispanic Churches 

Identification and analysis of the economic, 
social, and cultural factors influencing the ex- 
perience of the Hispanics in the U.S.A. and an 
examination of their implications for the 
educational ministry of the Hispanic churches. 
Consideration of Christian education in such a 
context as: 1) discipline that adapts critically 
methods and concepts from theology, social 
sciences and education; 2) ministry that con- 
siders the Hispanic resource materials and ec- 
clesiastical realities in order to be relevant to 
contextual educational needs. 
TBA Th6-9p.m. Fall 

CANON LAW 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS M-304, 305, 306 
The Practice of Ministry 

Through placement in churches, social agencies, 
chaplaincies and social issues ministries, stu- 
dents will begin to discover the nature of the 
world that calls them into ministry as well as 
who they are called to be in that world and in 
ministry. Direct field experience, supervision, 
workshops and seminars will combine to help 
students sharpen their skills while struggling to a 
new understanding of themselves, the Church 
and the world. Recommended for Middlers. 
Half-course each quarter. 
Jarvis TBA Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 (1 full course each 

quarter) 

Basic Ministry Practicum 

Basic Ministry Practicum is a core experience 



73 



Supervised Ministry 



required of all M.Div. students entering CTU. It 
involves three major elements: 1) Pastoral 
Reflection Group, 2) Field Experience in Ap- 
proved Ministerial Centers, 3) Concomitant 
Workshops/Intensives. The major focus of this 
Seminar is ministry to individuals. Approval of 
one's religious community (if applicable) and 
CMM Department required. 
Staff TBAr Fall 380/ Winter 385/Spring 390 

II. ADVANCED 

MTS M-405 

Field Education Seminar 

For students who want a second year of field 
education. This seminar will share studies 
throughout the year from each student's 
placement and reflect pastorally, theologically 
and personally on issues in ministry. Half- 
course credit. 
Jarvis TBA Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-443 

Pastoral Care of the Mentally 111 

Day-long (working hours) experience once each 
week, with sampling of dimensions of Clinical 
Pastoral Education, in the setting of a 
psychiatric hospital, with seminars, lectures, 
work reports on pastoral visitation of patients; 
group discussions; supervision on job by 
Chaplain Supervisor and at DeAndreis through 
peer-group supervisory seminar once each 
week. 
Ulrich T Fall/Spring 

DIT M-444 

Pastoral Care of the Physically 111 

As in M-443, but in general hospital setting. 
Ulrich T Fall/Spring 

DIT M-445 
Deacon Internship 

(For course description see Summer, page 53). 
Ulrich, Minogue Intensive Summer/Fall 



CTU M-480, 481, 482 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Religious 

Education 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on religious 
education. The consultant/teacher at CTU helps 
the student develop and write a case history 
detailing a pastoral involvement in the area of 



religious education. A concomitant course in the 
area of religious education is required. 
Prerequisite is Basic Ministry Practicum, or ap- 
proval of the CMM Department at CTU. 
Lucinio TBAr 

Fall 480 Winter 481 'Spring 482 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Spirituality 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on spirituality. 
The consultant/teacher at CTU helps the 
student develop and write a case history 
detailing a pastoral involvement in the area of 
spirituality. A concomitant course in the area of 
spirituality is required. Prerequisite is Basic 
Ministry Practicum or approval of the CMM 
Department at CTU. 
Lozano TBAr 

Fall 483 /Winter 484 /Spring 485 

CTU M-486, 487, 488 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Worship 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on worship. The 
consultant/teacher at CTU helps the student 
develop and write a case history detailing a 
pastoral involvement in the area of worship. A 
concomitant course in the area of worship is 
required. Prerequisite is Basic Ministry Prac- 
ticum, or approval of the CMM Department at 
CTU. 
Kcifer TBAr 

Fall 486/Winter 487 /Spring 488 

CTU M-489, 490, 491 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Community 

Development 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on community 
development. The consultant/teacher at CTU 
helps the student develop and write a case 
history detailing pastoral involvement in the 
area of community development. A con- 
comitant course in the area of community 
development is required. Prerequisite is Basic 
Ministry Practicum, or approval of the CMM 
Department at CTU. 
Boberg TBAr 

Fall 489/Winter 490/Spring 491 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 

Advanced Ministry Practicum: Social Justice 

The student engages in supervised ministry in a 
year-long placement focusing on social justice. 



74 



Supervised Ministry 



The consultant/ teacher at CTU helps the 
student develop and write a case history 
detailing a pastoral involvement in the area of 
social justice. A concomitant course in the area 
of social justice is required. Prerequisite is Basic 
Ministry Practicum, or approval of the CMM 
Department at CTU. 
Szura TBAr 

Fall 492/Winter 493/Spring 494 

DIT M-540 

Intensive Clinical Pastoral Education 

On completing M-340-342 and M-443-444 
sequences, student may elect to seek enrollment 
in an intensive quarter of Clinical Pastoral 
Education at any center accredited by the 
Association for Clinical Pastoral Education to 
offer this teaching. Having made this option, 
student is required to fufill it before ordination 
to the priesthood, but optimally before ac- 
cepting ordination to the diaconate. Enrollment 
is limited to DeAndreis students. 
Supervisor TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-541, 542, 543 

Pastoral Care Through Ministerial 

Supervision 

An opportunity to learn principles and method 
to ministerial supervision, through directed 
readings, weekly peer-group seminar and co- 
supervision of a theological reflection seminar. 
Admittance after personal interview and per- 
mission of professor. 
Staff TBAr Fall/Winter/Spring 

DIT M-550, 551, 552 
The Ministry Education 

Student placement is in an educational setting 
worked out between the student and supervisor. 
Peer-group theological reflection sessions are 
mandatory once a week. 
Qark TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-553, 554, 555 

Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

Supervised ministry to the imprisoned. Two 

credit hours awarded each quarter. 

Ulrich TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

jCCTS Practica ^^^ 

The following field practica are available for 
D.Min. candidates and are individually 
arranged through the student's major professor. 
Each practicum is to include on a weekly basis: 



an appropriate period of professional practice, a 
one-hour supervisory conference, a IV2 hr. case 
conference plus an hour of didactic input and 
theory. While academically required, these 
practica also serve toward accreditation in ap- 
propriate professional organizations, i.e. the 
American Association of Pastoral Counselors, 
the American Association for Marriage and 
Family Therapy, the Association for Clinical 
Pastoral Education, etc. 



CCTS M-620A, B, C Practicum in 
Congregational Care 



Staff 



TBA, 



Fall A/ Winter B/ Spring C 



CCTS M-622A-F, Practicum in Marriage and 
Family Counseling 

Swanson/Hebda TBAr 

FallA, D/WinterB, E/SpringC, F 



CCTS M-624A-F, Practicum in Pastoral 
Psychotherapy 



Staff TBAr FallA, D/WinterB, E/SpringC, F 



CCTS M-626A, B, C Practicum in Group Work 
and Group Counseling 



Staff 



TBAr 
FallA D/WinterB, E/SpringC, F 



CCTS M-628A, B, C Practicum in Geriatric 
Pastoral Care 



Staff 



TBAr 
Fall A/Winter B/Spring C 



CCTS M-630A, B, C Practicum in Drug Use 
and Abuse 



Staff 



TBAr 
Fall A/ Winter B/ Spring C 



CCTS M-634A, B, C Practicum in Religion and 
Medicine 



Staff 



TBAr 
Fall A/ Winter B/ Spring C 



CCTS M-636A, B, C Practicum in Community 
Mental Health 



Staff 



TBAr 
Fall A/ Winter B/ Spring C 



CCTS M-638A, B, C Practicum in Clinical 
Pastoral Education 



Staff 



TBAr 
Fall A/Winter B/Spring C 



75 



Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 

INTERDISCIPLINARY/ 
INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 

NBTS 1-300 

Nature and Mission of the Church 

An interdisciplinary study of Old Testament an- 
tecedents to the church, its nature, message, and 
task according to the New Testament; changing 
views of the church through its history; 
theological understandings of its nature, 
organization, and mission; its relationships to 



society; and practical perspectives on its work 
in terms of the various aspects of its mission. 
Nelson WF8-9-.20 Fall 



CTU 1-415 

M.T.S. Colloquium 

An integrative seminar designed to help in- 
tegrate previous pastoral experience with the 
study of theology for Master of Theological 
Studies degree candidates. 
Dunning Th 10:30-1 Fall 



76 



Old Testament 



WINTER 1981 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

OLD TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS CH-302 

The People and Faith of Israel II 

A second course for beginning student dealing 
with selections from the prophetic books of the 
Old Testament. The purpose of this course is to 
acquaint the student with one of the major 
literatures of the Bible and to examine it from 
several points of view, including its relevance 
for the pastoral ministry. 
Lacocque MW 11 -12:20 Winter 

LSTC B-311 

Old Testament Studies II 

A study of the prophetic movement from Elijah 
to the post-exilic prophets and of the beginning 
of eschatology and apocalypticism. 
Fuerst, Michel MWF9-9:50 Winter 

MTS B-312 

From David to Daniel: History, Literature, 

Theological Ferment 

A study of the Israelite and Jewish literature 
from II Samuel to I Maccabees, giving in-depth 
attention to representatives of each canonical 
division and literary category. Prerequisite: The 
course presupposes familiarity with critical 
method as acquired in MTS B-301 or its 
equivalent. 
Boling MW 10-11:50 Winter 

NBTS B-324 

Old Testament II : Literature 

This course is an introduction to the Old 
Testament as literature. Attention is given to 
various methodologies used in interpreting the 
Old Testament such as text-, form-, redaction-, 
and literature criticism. The various literary 
forms are studied as carriers of the ancient 
Hebrew faith and revelation. 
Bjornard TTh8-9:20 Winter 

NBTS B-325A- 

Old Testament : A Third World Reading 

Panoramic examination of the more represen- 
tative emphases in the history of Biblical in- 
terpretation with special reference to the her- 
meneutical problem in "theologizing from the 
underside of history". Methodological con- 



siderations for a third world reading of the Old 
Testament. Emphasis on the student's 
reading/interpretation of Old Testament texts 
selected among those that are privileged by the 
third world theologies, for later exposition and 
discussion in class. 
TEA Th6-9p.m. Winter 

DIT B-442 

Old Testament Survey I 

This course (the first of a two quarter sequence) 
begins the survey of the history and theology of 
the books of the Old Testament. An historical 
framework is offered within which the books of 
the Old Testament are considered within their 
literary categories. A synthesis of the Theology 
of the Old Testament is attempted. Emphasis is 
placed on methodologies of interpreting the 
literary genres. Book reports and scholarly 
paper are required. Opportunity will be 
provided for some students to translate their 
academic work into popular communication by 
participation in lay discussion groups as an 
alternative to the scholarly paper. Prerequisite: 
B-341. 
Fischer MWF9-.10-10 Winter 



II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

BTS B-324 

Old Testament Exegesis : Genesis 

This course will use a study of Genesis to teach 
historical exegetical methodology. The primary 
task will be to write an exegesis on a text in 
Genesis 12-50. Class discussion will focus on 
chapters 1-11. 
Roop WF8-9-.20 Winter 

NBTS B-523 

The Israelite Priesthood 

This seminar investigates the growth of the in- 
stitution of Israelite priesthood from early 
sporadic assistance to post-exilic dominance of 
their nation. The relationship between the 
priests and the prophets, between cultus and 
faith, between religion and politics are studied 
with a special view to the tension between social 
and religious form on the one hand and Divine 
revelation on the other. 
Bjornard WF 2:10 -3:30 Win ter 

CTU B-405 
Deuteronomistic History 

Deuteronomy and the deuteronomistic books of 



77 



Old Testament 



Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings are studied 
for their theology of history and their in- 
terpretation of covenant, covenant renewal and 
leadership. The course will also deal with the 
applicability of the basic themes of this theology 
to pastoral situations. 
Bergant TTh 9-10: 15 Winter 

MTS B-440 

1st and 2nd Samuel 

An exegetical study of these two books which 
recount the transition to monarchy and the 
beginnings of the prophetic movement in an- 
cient Israel. The course will give special at- 
tention to the genesis of the stories and to their 
theological reuse in the formation of the canon. 
There will be opportunity to use the Hebrew 
Bible, but Hebrew language is not prerequisite 
for the course. 
Boling F 9 -11:50 Winter 

MTS B-411 

Israel's Eighth-Century Prophets 

A study of Amos, Hosea, Isaiah and Micah 
against the backdrop of the second half of the 
eighth century. There will be opportunity for 
students who use Hebrew to put it to work, but 
the course is open to those who have not 
studied Hebrew. Requisite: 301 or equivalent. 
Campbell MW 10 -11: 50 Winter 

CTU B-415 

Evolving Forms of Prophecy in Later Israel 

Key passages from Ezekiel, Deutero-Isaiah and 
some post-exilic prophets will be studied within 
the context of ancient Israel and for their value 
in struggling with traditions and adapting them 
to new theological or pastoral situations. Im- 
portant for appreciating the Old Testament 
basis of priesthood and church, suffering, 
redemption and re-creation. 
Hoppe MW 1:30 -2:45 Winter 

CTU B-425 
Wisdom Literature 

Primary focus will be on such perennial themes 
as creation, suffering, birth and death, 
retribution and immortality in Job, Proverbs, 
Ecclesiastes, Sirach, and the Wisdom of 
Solomon. Wisdom theology with its emphasis on 
human behavior will be compared with other 
theologies found in the Old Testament. At- 
tention will be given to the applicability of this 
theology to contemporary human development 



and pastoral ministry. 
Bergant TTh 12 - 1 



15 



Winter 



DIT B-546 

The Wisdom Tradition 

A study of the historical origins of the Wisdom 
Tradition, the literary forms employed, and the 
development of this tradition in both the Old 
Testament and the New Testament. Attention 
will be paid to the main theological axes. 
Prerequisites: B-341 and Survey courses in Old 
Testament and New Testament. 
Fischer W Winter 



See, 



III. THEOLOGY 

MTS B-423 

Wealth and Poverty in the Bible vce p. SS 

In this course we will study the theme of wealth 
and poverty in the Old and New Testaments. We 
will examine Biblical perspectives on what it 
means to possess property or to lack it, the 
spiritual significance of having and not having 
material goods, and the relationships between 
the relatively rich and the relatively poor. We 
will consider the claims these texts make on our 
lives today and how we may respond to these 
claims. Prerequisite: Introductory work in Old 
and New Testament. 

Collins T 7 -9:50 p.m. Fall 

(CENTER) 

BTS B-521 

Nonviolence and the Biblical Tradition 

This course will explore selected topics from the 
biblical traditons. Major time will be given to 
Holy War and Jesus as a revolutionary. The 
course is intended to explore issues rather than 
develop an apology for pacifism. 
Roop/Meyer W 2:10 -4:55 Winter 

IV. HERMENEUTICS OR 
RABBINICS 



CTS CH-610B 
Intertestamental Literature 

This is the second quarter of the ongoing 
seminar in Second Temple Period Literature. 
See Fall Quarter's CH-610A for course descrip- 
tion and details. 
Lacocque TTh 9:30 - 10 : 50 Winter 



78 



New Testament 

V. OLD TESTAMENT WORLD 

LSTC B-601 

Graduate Biblical Seminar 

Graduate students in the biblical field will make 
presentations based on their specialized interests 
and scholarly research. The method of the 
seminar will be to distribute, discuss, and 
critically examine the papers of class par- 
ticipants. (For post M-Div. students. Admission 
of others only by approval of instructor.) 
Fuerst M 7 - 10 Winter 

VI. HEBREW LANGUAGE 

LSTC B-300 
Hebrew I 

In this course the students will become familiar 
with essential vocabulary used in Biblical 
Hebrew and gain a working knowledge of 
Hebrew grammar, thus acquiring a fundamental 
exegetical tool for the study of the Bible. 
Michel MWF8-8:50 Win ter 

NBTS B-311A 
Hebrew II 

See description B-311A Fall Section of the 

Catalog. 

TBA TWF1-.10-2 Winter 

NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU B-305A, B, C 

New Testament Introduction 

The writings of the New Testament will be 
presented in their historical, cultural, religious 
and sociological context. Introduction to the 
methodological tools employed in New 
Testament research and to the diverse theologies 
that comprise the New Testament witness to 
Jesus of Nazareth. Especially designed for those 
beginning a program of theological study or for 
those seeking a foundational knowledge of the 
New Testament for personal or professional 
enrichment. 

Senior Sec. A: MW 12 -1:15 Win ter 

Osiek Sec. B: MW 9 -10:15 Winter 

LaVerdiere Sec. C: M 7 -9:30 p.m. . Winter 

NBTS B-331 

The Synoptic Gospels 

An introductory study of the message and 



Old Testament 

ministry of Jesus as set forth in the Gospels. The 
major emphasis will be upon significant events 
and teachings in the Gospels examined from the 
standpoint of their source, form, and redaction. 
The course will include lectures, discussion, and 
the use of exegetical tools. 
Guelich WF 10:40 -12 Winter 

MTS B-302 
Jesus 

A basic entry course into the study of the New 
Testament focusing on the first three Gospels. In 
lectures and discussion, we concentrate on the 
Gospel of Mark as a literary expression of early 
Christian faith; on the expressive forms, such as 
parable, saying and pronouncement story, as 
major sources for reconstructing the life and 
faith of early Christianity and the activity of 
Jesus; on the constructive powers of symbol 
and myth in the gospel traditions; on the 
Gospel of Matthew as an early interpretation of 
the gospel genre; on Palestine as the world in 
which Jesus acted; and on the passion and 
resurrection narratives. Through discussion, 
assigned readings, exegetical work and critical 
ear for texts, we envision the relations bet- 
ween commitment and criticism, and the ones 
between historical reconstruction and 
theological interpretation. 

Hilgert Sec. I: TTh 10 - 11:50 Winter 

Sec. II: T 7 - 9:50 p.m. Winter 

(CENTER) 

CTS CH-321 
Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the thought of the authors of the 
Gospels and of the oral traditions which they 
used. An attempt will be made to discover 
which traditons give evidence of the authentic 
historical ministry of Jesus. 
Scroggs MW2-3-.30 Winter 

LSTC B-311 
Gospel Tradition 

This introduction to the four gospels includes a 
study of the content of each gospel and an in- 
vestigation of the way each author structured 
and edited the tradition so as to respond to 
specific needs of the church. The various strata 
underlying the present gospels will be examined. 
Students will be introduced to the history of 
gospel study and given practice in the use of 
contemporary critical methods of gospel study. 
Norquis t MWF11-11-.50 Win ter 

Voobus TF 1-2:15 Win ter 




79 



New Testament 

DIT B-450 
Synoptic Gospels 

A study of the gospels of Mark, Matthew and 
Luke. Emphasis will be placed on how the 
gospel narratives were presented to meet the 
needs of the early Christian communities. In- 
dividual passages in each gospel will be the 
focus of exegesis papers, lectures, discussions 
and readings. Participation in lay discussion 
groups will be offered as an alternative to an 
exegesis paper, to enable some students the op- 
portunity of using their study in a pastoral set- 
ting. 
VanLinden MWF9-.10-10 Winter 

II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTS CH-521 
1 Corinthians 

Exegesis of this significant theological and 
ethical document of Paul. Prerequisite: CH-321 
or equivalent. 
Scroggs TTh 11 -12:20 Winter 

LSTC B-448 

Hebrews Through Revelation 

For the student who wishes to complete the 
study of the New Testament (after Gospel 
Tradition and Pauline Tradition) with a course 
covering the remaining books. The individual 
books will be put into their possible historical 
setting, their content will be studied, and 
exegesis of selected parts will be undertaken. 
Emphasis will be placed on Hebrews and 
Revelation. 
Linss MW 1-2:15 Winter 

NBTS B-439 

The Revelation of John 

A survey of one of the most exciting, 
challenging and controversial books of the New 
Testament. Attention will be given to methods 
of interpretation and eschatological views. Em- 
phasis will be placed on its message and 
significance for the Church today. 
Guelich TTh 11 -12:15 Winter 

III. NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY 

BTS B-332 

New Testament Theology 

A study of the various theologies of the New 
Testament with special emphasis on Paul and 



John. The course is also designed to demon- 
strate the role of the books of the New 
Testament in the several theological traditions. 
Snyder TTh 11 -12:20 Winter 

LSTC B-442 

Resurrection in the New Testament <V<? /{ /q^ 

This course consists of an exegetical study of the 

resurrection tradition in I Corinthians 15 and 

the resurrection narratives in the Gospels. 

Special attention is given to the question of the 

significance of the resurrection for Christian 

faith. 

Norquist TF 1-2:15 Spring 

DIT B-555 

Eucharist in New Testament 

A seminar focusing on the Eucharist tradition as 
it emerges in the various New Testament wit- 
nesses. Reading and exegesis work will attempt 
to trace the major lines of the developing un- 
derstanding of Eucharist in the New Testament. 
Prerequisite: B-341. 
VanLinden W Winter 

CTU B-576 

The Ministry of Women in the Early Church 

For a fuller understanding of the Church and its 
total ministry, this course will explore the 
variety of roles exercised by women in the early 
Church from the Apostolic to the Constantinian 
Age, with special focus on the interpretation of 
Pauline passages about women and the impact 
of the texts of contemporary thinking regarding 
women in ministry. Critical analysis of texts by 
students will be stressed. 
Osiek MW3-4:15 Winter 

DIT B-590 
Special Topics 

Tutorials in various Biblical topics are offered 
from time to time in response to student in- 
terest. They will be noted as they are taught un- 
der this number. Contact Professor for subject. 
Staff TBAr Upon Request 

CTU B-592 

The Eucharist in the New Testament 

An investigation of the Eucharist's origins and 
developments in the New Testament period. 
The seminar will focus on historical questions as 
well as on the literary and pastoral presentation 
of the Eucharist in the various New Testament 
writings. It will also address the way our find- 
ings challenge the Church of today with regard 



80 



Historical Studies 



New Testament 



to both inculturation and social justice. Ac- 
countability, assigned readings, discussions and 
a paper. 
LaVerdiere 



TTh 1:30 -2:45 



Winter 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT ETHICS 



V. EXEGISIS & METHODOLOGY 



VI. NEW TESTAMENT WORLD 

MTS B-315 

History of New Testament Times II : from the 
Death of Jesus to the Beginning of 
Gnosticism (200 C.E.) 

A study of the elements of the world in which 
Christianity emerged (such as the economic, 
political and social phenomena and the for- 
mative ideas of the time) and the prominent 
elements of the Christian Movement itself. 
Reeves TTh 10 - 11 :50 Winter 

VII. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

LSTC B-309A 
Greek Readings 

This course will continue the study of Greek 
grammar, based on the reading of selected parts 
of the Greek New Testament. 
Linss MWF 11 - 11 : 50 Winter 

BTS B-316B 
Greek 

See description B-316A fall section of the 

catalog. 

Barton TWF 1:10-2 Win ter 

NBTS B-316B 

Elements of New Testament Greek II 

See description B-316A Fall Section of the 

Catalog. 

Barton TWF 1:10-2 Win ter 

MTS B-324/325 

Introduction to New Testament Greek I, II 

(For course description see Fall) 
Reeves Sec. I : M TWTh 8-8:50 Win ter 
Sec. II: MTWTh9-9:50 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS H-319/320 

The Growth of the Christian Tradition: 

A History of Christian Doctrine 

(For course description see Fall Introductory) 
Rigdon MW 2 -3:50 p.m. Fall 

TTh7-9p.m. Winter 

CTU H-300A, B 
Early Christianity 

The development of doctrine and practice to 450 
A.D. Lecture topics will include Trinitarian 
dogma, the person and work of Christ, the 
relation between human freedom and divine 
grace, and the development of sacramental 
practice. Required readings in primary materials 
will concentrate on Christian life and 
spirituality. Reading reports and examination. 
Young Sec. A. : MW 10:30 - 11 :45 Winter 
Young Sec. B: MW 1:30 - 2:45 Win ter 

DIT H-309 

History of the Church from 700 to 1500 A.D. 
Intellectual development and structuring of 
Christian thought. The development of the papa- 
cy and the structures of the Church within the 
context of Christendom. Prerequisite: H-307. 
Groves MWF 10:10 -11 Winter 

CTS CH-342 

Christianity in the World : 
History of Christian People II 

A continuation of CTS CH-341. Special at- 
tention will be given to late medieval and 
renaissance developments, the conciliar 
movement, the Reformation, the Counter- 
Reformation, the Anabaptists, and emerging 
new forms of Christian expression. 
Manschreck MW 11 -12:20 Winter 

LSTC H-330B 

Reformation and Modern Church History 

An introduction to Reformation and Modern 

Church History outside America, designed to 

show in broad perspective the movements 

which have shaped world Christianity in our 

time. Lectures and discussions of selected source 

readings. 

Fischer MWF 9 -9:50 Win ter 



81 



Historical Studies 



BTS H-347 

History of Christianity II 

This course provides an overview of the 
development of the Christian churches in the 
modern period. Among topics covered are: 
Protestant Scholasticism and Pietism, the 
Evangelical Revivial, Revolution and Roman- 
ticism, the Age of Progress, the Roman Catholic 
Reaction, Eastern Orthodoxy in the Modern 
Period, the Ecumenical Movement, and the 
Churches and Totalitarianism. 
Durnbaugh TTh 8 - 9:20 Winter 

BTS H-440 

The Radical Reformation 

A seminar on the "Left Wing" of the Refor- 
mation with readings in representative literature 
from Anabaptism, Spiritualism, and Evangelical 
Rationalism. Participants are assumed to have 
general background understanding of the Refor- 
mation Era. 
Durnbaugh T 7 - 9:45 p.m. Winter 

CTS CH-462 

The Left Wing of the Reformation 

Anabaptism on the Continent and in England, 
its beginnings, conceptions and expressions with 
emphasis on those ideas and developments that 
have influenced the Free Church tradition. 
Manschreck TTh 11:20- 12:20 Winter 

DIT H-310 

History of the Church from 1500 to the Present 

The fragmentation of Christendom and new 
theological thought. The Church on the defen- 
sive in the Age of the Enlightenment and the 
Revolutionary Age. The attempts of the Church 
to cope with the Modern Age. 
Groves MWF9-.10-10 Winter 

MTS H-442 

Liberal Theology in America 

Since the Civil War 

Special attention will be given to evangelical 
liberalism, the social gospel, and modernistic 
liberalism. The present status of theological 
liberalism will be considered in light of twen- 
tieth-century critiques. 
Schafer F 9 -11:50 Winter 



II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

M/L H-394 

Unitarian Universalist History 

An introduction to Unitarian Universalist 
history, focused toward preparing ministers to 
help congregations become aware of the 
heritage of liberal religion. Attention will be 
given to European and American origins, the 
Unitarian Universalist Association, and the 
Ethical Culture Society. 
Godbey TBAr Winter 

NBTS C-447 
Baptist Thought 

An examination and evaluation of characteristic 
Baptist emphases in theology, polity, and prac- 
tice for the purpose of establishing our Baptist 
identity on the one hand and clarifying our 
commonality with the larger believers' church 
tradition on the other. Student research, 
analysis, and evaluation of selected issues con- 
stitute a vital part of the course. 
Ohlmann TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

LSTC H-561 
Lutheran Unity 

This seminar will examine the proposed union 
between the American Lutheran Church and the 
Lutheran Church in America, its imperatives, 
hindrances and prospects. Attention will be 
given to Biblical, confessional and ethnic roots, 
negotiations in the recent past and their suc- 
cesses and failures, to upcoming theological and 
ministerial issues, and to the projection of alter- 
native structures and ramifications for the 
future at local parish, synod, national and 
world church levels. Implications for relations 
with other Lutherans and for dialog with 
Roman Catholic and other church bodies will 
also be examined. 
Fischer/ Tobias WF 11 -12:15 Winter 

III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

MTS H-401 

Seminar on the Theology of John Calvin 

A systemic study of Calvin's theology as seen 

primarily in the Institutes of the Christian 

Religion. 

Rigdon T 2- 4:50 Winter 



82 



Theological Studies 

IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 

NBTS C-445 

Christianity and Culture in America: 

An Historical Perspective 

An inquiry into the interrelationship between 
Christianity and culture, through an 
examination of the ways in which Christianity 
has shaped various dimensions of American 
culture (such as its nationalism, political life, 
education, public morality and social reform), 
and ways in which American Christianity, in 
turn, has been shaped by environmental and 
sociological dynamics of the American context 
(such as the frontier, Civil Religion, etc.) 
Ohlmann WF8-9:20 Winter 

NBTS C-548 

Perspectives on Evangelicalism 

An interdisciplinary seminar that will critically 
evaluate interpretations (theological, historical, 
sociological, etc.) of American Evangelicalism. 
Limited Enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of in- 
instructor and basic introduction to post- 
Reformation theological developments and /or 
American church history. Jointly co-ordinated 
by Donald Dayton of Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary and William Wells of 
Wheaton Graduate School. 
Dayton/Wells Th 7 - 10 p. m. Winter 

(Exact dates and place yet to be determined) 

V. SELECTED TOPICS 

CTU H-325 

Models of Missionary Activity in the 

Church's History 

A survey is given of the variety of forms that 
missionary activity has taken from the 
Apologists in the Roman Empire to the classical 
image of the 19th century missionary. An 
examination is made both of the factors that 
determined the model used and of its ef- 
fectiveness. Project and examinations. 
Nemer MW 3-4:15 Win ter 

CTU H-422 

19th Century Europe and World Mission 

A study is made of the Church of Europe as it 
encounters the new world born of the French 
Revolution as a context for her missionary 
movement. Major considerations are given to 
the Church's encounter with French and Italian 
political liberalism and with German and 



Historical Studies 

English philosophical and theological liberalism 
as well as the development of Imperialism in 
Europe. A student chooses a Church in a par- 
ticular country outside of Europe to examine in 
depth and then to reflect on the characteristics 
of the missionary movement to that country. 
Nemer MW 10 : 30 - 11 : 45 Winter 

CTU H-430 

Vatican II : Problem or Solution? 

The first part of this course will concentrate on 
the Second Vatican Council: the background, 
the personalities, the problems, the solutions. 
The remainder of the course will examine the 
post-conciliar Church, its life and goals, with 
the intention of discovering whether or not 
Vatican II can respond to the problems of the 
post-conciliar Church. There will be bi-weekly 
reading reports from an approved syllabus. For 
the final, two weeks are allowed for the 
development of a topic synthesizing class matter 
and readings. 
Ross W 7 - 9:30 p.m. Winter 

LSTC H-455 

Church and Mission in Contemporary Africa 

Christian growth and ministry in the world's 
fastest growing area of Christian community 
will be studied, along with the African con- 
tribution to contemporary theology and mission 
in the world. Themes to be discussed are the 
Africanization of Christianity, the moratorium 
issue, the dialogue between Christianity and 
African traditional religion, and the im- 
plications of African Socialism for the life and 
mission of the churches. 
Scherer TF 1-2:15 Win ter 

THEOLOGY 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

DIT T-302 

Theological Anthropology 

The course seeks to provide the fundamental 
horizon and principles grounding modern 
theology. A survey of anthropologies at the 
basis of various theologies will be presented. 
The course will focus on man as self- 
transcending being through an analysis of the 
symbolic and communitarian nature of his 
being. 
Minogue MWF8-.10-9 Winter 




83 



Theological Studies 



LSTC T-312 
Christian Theology II 

(For course description, see Theological Studies, 

Fall.) 

Braaten MWF 11 - 11 : 50 Winter 

Hefner TTh 11-12:15 Win ter 

CTU T-325A, B 
Introduction to Theology 

A consideration of the nature, sources, and 
methods of theology worked out from a study 
of several case histories. Special emphasis on the 
historical revelation in Christianity and the 
developing awareness of the faith-community in 
relation to shifting horizons. 
Hayes Sec. A: MW 12 -1:15 Fall 

Schineller Sec. B: MW 10:30 - 11:45 . Fall 
Linnan MW 12 -1:15 Win ter 

NBTS C-354 
Christian Theology: 
An Eschatalogical Approach 
An introduction to the basic issues of systematic 
theology which begins from the early Christian 
proclamation of the life, death, resurrection, 
exaltation, and expected return of Jesus Christ 
and the lifestyle which these generated. 
Theological areas explored are eschatology (the 
climax of history), revelation (as personal, 
historical, and propositional) and the "work" of 
Christ (his saving life, death, and resurrection). 
The course attempts creatively to relate 
traditional theological issues to life in the 
modern world. 

Prerequisite C-353 or permission of the in- 
structor. 
Finger TTh 9:30-10:50 Win ter 

MTS T-413 
Theology for Ministry 

This course is designed to help students develop 
an integrated theological understanding of their 
ministry. Emphasis will be given to critical 
reflection upon the doctrines, problems, and 
issues of christology and ecclesiology as these 
inform responsible ministry today. 
Burkhart MW2-3-.50 Winter 



II. PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

MTS T-315 

Hispanic-American Cultural Resources for 

Theological Reflection 

Recent writings by Hispanic authors offer 



cultural resources for theological reflection. 
Selected sources will be examined for the pur- 
pose of gleaning those contributions which lend 
themselves to such reflections. 
Armendariz M2-4-.50 Winter 

CTS CH-390 

An Inquiry into Methodism 

A study of the history, theology, and polity of 
Methodism from Wesley to the present. Offered 
in two parts in alternate winter terms: A) 
History and Doctrines of Methodism; B) Polity 
and Its Significance. 

Manschreck/Blackivell Winter 

Moore Th 6:30 -9:30 

LSTC T-430 

Black Theology and the Black Church 

The course consists of an analytic survey of the 
Black experience in the United States, 
theologically correlated with historical, 
psychological, and sociological factors. Special 
consideration will be given to the critical con- 
struction of a coherent expression of the 
Christian reality (event, proclamation, 
celebration of the Christian Gospel) so that it 
redemptively engages the world of cultures. 
Pero M7-10 Winter 

M/L TS-438 
Process Theology 

An intermediate level seminar stressing careful 
reading and analysis of representative process 
philosophers and theologians, such as 
Whitehead, Wieman, Hartshorne, Meland, and 
Cobb. Key philosophical concepts will be 
reviewed, but some prior reading of Whitehead 
will be presupposed. 
Reeves/ Engel TBAr Winter 

LSTC T-456 
Liberation Theology 

This course aims to analyze the nature, func- 
tion, and method of liberation theology in order 
that the student may become aware of its poten- 
tial as serious theological discourse comparable 
to other classical theologies. Attention is given 
to some of the main theological issues and 
problems which arise in the study of liberation 
theology. 
Pero MW 2:30 -3:45 Win ter 

NBTS C-548 

Perspectives on Evangelicalism 

An interdisciplinary seminar that will critically 



84 



Theological Studies 



evaluate interpretations (theological, historical, 
sociological, etc.) of American Evangelicalism. 
Limited Enrollment. Prerequisite: consent of in- 
structor and basic introduction to post- 
Reformation theological developments and /or 
American church history. Jointly co-ordinated 
by Donald Dayton of Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary and William Wells of 
Wheaton Graduate School. 

Dayton/ Wells ' Th 7 -10 p.m. Winter 

(Exact dates and place yet to be determined) 

III. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS 

BTS T-451 

The Theology of H. Richard Niebuhr 

This seminar will examine Niebuhr's writings, 
concentrating on his method: integration of 
issues from contemporary cognate disciplines 
with those of traditional theological, ethical, 
and ecclesiological concerns. 
Meyer WF 10: 40 -12 Win ter 

CTU T-493 

The Experience of God in Teresa of Avila 

and John of the Cross 

A study of the mysticism of the Spanish Car- 
melites, Teresa of Avila and John of the Cross. 
After an overview of the cultural and spiritual 
context and the body of their writings, their 
respective understanding of the nature and 
stages of mystical experience will be analyzed 
and compared. Requirements include a short 
report on at least one work of Teresa or John. 
Lozano TTh 9 -10:15 Winter 

NBTS C-555 

Seminar in the Theology of Karl Barth 

This seminar will consist of a close reading of 
one or two volumes of the Church Dogmatics. 
Volumes and thus topics will vary from year to 
year, but themes of Christology and the Doc- 
trine of Reconciliation will be a special and 
recurring focus. Prerequisites: Christian 
Theology or its equivalent with permission of 
the instructor. 
Dayton M7 -9:30 p.m. Winter 

IV. MAJOR TOPICS IN THEOLOGY 

MTS T-404 
Doctrine of Christ 

Considers the doctrine of the person and work 



of Jesus Christ as the basis for Christian faith in 
God. Particular attention will be given to the 
problems of the uniqueness and the universality 
of Jesus Christ vis-a-vis other bases of faith. 
Parker TTh 10-11:50 Win ter 

DIT T-423 
Man In Christ 

The course will consider the conditions for the 
possibility and consequences of God's self- 
communication to man in Christ. A historical 
perspective will be provided by considering the 
problems and conceptual framework leading to 
the scholastic synthesis on nature and grace. 
The main emphasis of the course will be the ex- 
plicitation of the multiple dimensions of man's 
life in Christ through a consideration of 
obediential potency, conversion, and the life of 
charity. The virgin Mary is studied as the most 
perfect of the redeemed. 
Min ogue MW 1-2:30 Win ter 

CTU 1-439 
Christology 

A two-quarter, team-taught course on the 
mystery of Christ. The first quarter will con- 
centrate on the problems of Christology in the 
New Testament. The second quarter will treat 
the development of Christology in the history of 
Conciliar theology and in systematic theology. 
Enrollment for two quarters mandatory: 3 
credits per quarter (applicable to CTU M.Div. 
synoptic and doctrinal requirements). 
Hayes/Senior MW 9-10: 15 Fall 

Hayes/Senior MW 9 -10:15 Winter 

CTU T-441 

Christology and Cultures 

A critical review of the development of un- 
derstandings of Jesus and salvation in the 
Christian tradition, and their implications in a 
cross-cultural context. Special attention is given 
to models of incarnation and salvation, univer- 
sal claims about Jesus within a religious 
pluralism, and the question of the ethnic Christ. 
Schreiter TTh 9 -10: 15 Winter 

LSTC T-458 
Hispanic-American Christologies 

Exploration of current Christologies existing 
among Hispanic-Americans, studying 
historically the development of such 
Christologies, and offering at the end of the 
course other possibilities for the further 
development of new Christologies. 
Navarro MW 1-2:15 Win ter 



85 



Theological Studies 



LSTC T-552 

Doctrines of Justification and Sanctification 

This seminar will focus on the doctrines of 
justification and sanctification as controversial 
topics within ecumenical dialogues. The aim 
will be to examine the wide variety of answers 
to the question of what it means to be and 
become a Christian. 
Braaten MW 2:30 -3:45 Winter 

DIT T-403 
Ecclesiology 

This course seeks to understand and explore the 
consequences of Vatican Us teaching in the 
dogmatic constitution "Lumen Gentium", in 
conjunction with the pastoral constitution "On 
the Church in the Modern World" and the 
Decree on Ecumenism, the Decree on the 
Bishops' Pastoral Office in the Church, the 
Decree on the Appropriate Renewal of the 
Religious Life, the Decree on the Apostolate of 
the Laity, the Decree on the Ministry and Life of 
Priests, the Decree on the Church's Missionary 
Activity and the Declaration of the Relationship 
of the Church to Non-Christian Religions. 
Special attention is given to the metaphors 
"People of God" and "Mystical Body of Christ". 
Various contemporary ecclesiological models 
are examined and compared. Special emphasis is 
placed on the universal Christian priesthood, 
the basic equality and functional inequality of 
Church members as well as upon the par- 
ticipation of each member of the church in its 
mission. 
Staff MWF9.10- 10 Winter 

DIT T-404 
Ecumenism 

This is an intensive seeking to provide the 
student with a basic overview of the Ecumenical 
Movement. It will concentrate on explicitating 
the key points of the Ecumenical Movement 
from a Roman Catholic perspective. 
Staff TBAr Winter 

CTU T-445 

Theology of the Church 

A study of the origins of the Church; the 
relation of the Kingdom to the Church; the 
basic images and themes in Scripture and 
tradition; the development of ecclesiastical of- 
fice; and the relation of the Church to the 
world, especially in relation to the socio- 
political situation of "Third World" countries. 
Linnan MW3-4:15 Winter 



CTU T-450 

Theology of the Eucharist 

A study of the scriptural origins and historical 
development of the eucharistic liturgy, with par- 
ticular emphasis on the eucharistic prayer. 
Theological reflection on the meaning of 
eucharist in light of the above and of con- 
temporary discussion. Consideration of current 
questions, e.g., ecumenical questions of inter- 
communion and eucharistic ministry. 
Ostdiek MW 10:30 - 11 -.45 Fall 

Keifer TTh 10:30 - 11 -.45 Winter 

MTS T-333 

Doctrines in Transition: 

Men, Women, and Theology 

A seminar to explore selected doctrines such as 
salvation, Christology, the image of God, in the 
context of the emerging dialogue among women 
and men in the church. The seminar will con- 
sider the Biblical and historical origins of select- 
ed doctrines, re-examine these doctrines in light 
of current expressions of belief and struggle with 
the future of these doctrines in the life of the 
people of faith. A balanced enrollment of men 
and women is desired. 
Parker/ Jarvis T 2- 4:50 Win ter 

DIT T-590 
Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects are offered under 
this rubric. Consult professor for topic in which 
you are interested. Offered in response to 
student interest. 
Staff TBAr Upon Request 

V. CHRISTIANITY AND 
THE WORLD 



M/L TS-381 

Biblical and Democratic Traditions 

An inquiry into the relations between biblical 
and democratic (primarily American) myth and 
symbol. Foundational texts, works of art, and 
historical events will be examined in order to 
illuminate basic theological issues involved in 
the relating of the Christian tradition to modern 
culture. 
Engel TBAr Winter 

CTU T-430 

The Problem of God and 

Contemporary Society 

(For course description see Fall, Theology) 
Hayes MW 1:30 - 2:45 p.m. Winter 



86 



( 



Ethical Studies 



Theological Studies 



LSTC T-570 

Christian Faith in a Scientific Age 

This course will survey basic issues that con- 
front theology today as a result of the scientific 
temper of the times. Attention will be given to 
historical issues, philosophy of science, and the 
possibilities of apologetic and constructive 
theological articulation in the context of scien- 
tific conceptualities. Prerequisites: Consent of 
instructor; Two prior courses in theology or 
philosophy. 
Hefner T 2:30 -5 Winter 

VI. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 



ETHICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC E-310B 

Christian Ethics: Theology and Ethics of 

H. Richard Niebuhr 

An inquiry into the contributions of H. R. 
Niebuhr to Christian ethical reflection. 
Benne/Norquist MW 1 -2:15 Winter 

BTS E-565 

The Ethics of Paul Tillich 

A seminar study of the writings of Paul Tillich, 
especially the Systematic Theology, in order to 
discover his method and the fundamental con- 
cepts of his thought and to assess the ap- 
plicability of his ideas to contemporary issues. 
Miller T 2:20 -4:55 Win ter 

II. THE BIBLE, THE CHURCH 
AND ETHICS 



DIT E-532 

St. Thomas on Virtue and Sin 

This will be a reading course on questions forty- 
nine through ninety-four of the first part of 
the second book of the Summa Theologica. 
This is a consideration of the interior dis- 
positions and dynamics that shape human 
activity and life. A short treatment of the 
exteriorization of these dispositions and 
dynamics in the natural law will be presented. 
Familiarization with Thomistic anthropology is 
a prerequisite for this course. The basic 
methodology of the course will be reading and 
discussion. 
Minogue W Winter 

IV. SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

CTU E-375 

Theological Foundations of Social Ethics 

An exploration of the theological sources which 
have informed, and the theological grounds 
which serve to justify, a variety of perspectives 
on social justice. Attention will be given to 
foundational texts in the Roman Catholic and 
Protestant traditions, and to the ways in which 
these texts influence contemporary writing in 
social ethics. 
Nairn MW 10:30 - 11:45 Winter 

MTS E-439 

Social Ethics in the Hispanic American Context: 

North and South 

Readings from the works of Latin American and 
North American Hispanics are examined with 
the purpose of arriving at a critical un- 
derstanding of their social ethics. Emphasis will 
be given to the differences in their description 
and prescription of social phenomena. 
Gar da F 9 -11:50 Winter 



III. MORAL THEOLOGY 

CTU E-370 

Christian Ethics : Invitation and Response 

This course is intended for students who have 
had no systematic approach to moral theology. 
The stress here will be on the basic principles of 
guiding human action and attitude, in so far as 
they are compatible with the essentials of 
Christian tradition and suitable for facilitating 
conscience formation and decision-making in 
the face of modern conflicts and problems. 
Diesbourg MW 9 -10:15 Winter 



NBTS C-458 

Moral Issues and Christian Response 

A survey and examination of several Christian 
responses to major contemporary moral issues: 
Bio-Ethical Issues, Eco-Justice Issues, War & 
Peace, Poverty & Racism, Environmental 
Issues, Pornography & Sexism, Feminism, and 
various Liberation Movements. 
Blanford TTh 9:30- 10 : 50 Winter 

CTU E-488 

Marxist Humanism and Christian Faith 

The course will study the problem of the ac- 



87 



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World Mission Studies 



cultivation of the Christian faith within the 
Marxist cultural and political context. The point 
of departure will be the study of possible 
relations between the content of Christian hope 
and its justification with the content of Marxist 
hope and its justification. To do this the course 
will try to answer two questions: a) what are 
the challenges that Marxist humanism brings to 
a Christian concept and praxis about humanity ; 
b) what challenges can a renewed Christian 
theology and praxis bring to Marxist humanism? 
The course will study key concepts and fun- 
damental socio-political structures of Marxism, 
approaching them genetically and com- 
paratively with correspondent concepts and 
structures in which Christian theology and 
praxis have been expressed in western 
Christianity, in view of disclosing their eventual 
capacity to become cultural expression of 
Christian faith and praxis. 
Fornasari MW 9 -10:15 Winter 

CTU E-540 

Social Ethics and American Catholicism 

An examination of the history of the Catholic 
Church's involvement in the struggle for justice 
in America will occupy the first part of the 
course. The second part will analyze important 
statements on peace and justice questions 
coming from American Catholic leaders. 
Pawlikowski TTh 10:30 - 11:45 Winter 

V. SEXUALITY 



VI. SELECTED TOPICS IN ETHICS 

MTS E-318 

Ethics II Moral Problems 

An examination of various substantive moral 
problems in the light of different theological and 
philosophical principles and methodological 
procedures. Among the possible topics for con- 
sideration: abortion, racism and sexism, pover- 
ty sexual morality, punishment, civil 
disobedience, suicide, lying. This course is com- 
plimentary to Ethics 313. 
Garcfa MW2-3: 50 Win ter 

LSTC E-432 

Seminar in Business Ethics 

An inquiry into current Christian perspectives 
on business ethics, accompanied by discussions 
with Christians in the business world. 
Benne T 2:30 -5 Winter 



CTU E-482 
Medical Ethics 

A study of the relation of general ethical prin- 
ciples and methods to the concerns of the 
medical profession. Among topics . treated will 
be abortion, standards for determining human 
death, experimentation with human subjects, 
genetic engineering, access to health care, and 
the interrelationships among the rights of 
patients, of doctors, and of society. 
Nairn MW3-4-.15 Winter 

DIT E-535 

Marriage and Divorce 

This seminar is pastorally orientated. It seeks to 
examine the common problems in marriage. The 
pastoral problems and care experienced by 
Catholic couples involved in a broken marriage. 
The course will also include a theological con- 
sideration of the Catholic Church's stance on in- 
dissolubility. 
Minogue M Winter 

DIT E-546 
Medical Ethics 

This seminar will review a traditional Catholic 
manual on medical-moral problems. A 
thorough analysis of the princple of double ef- 
fect will be attempted. Current theological 
thinking on the issues of care for the dying, ex- 
perimentation and genetic manipulation, 
sterilization will be examined. 
Minogue T Winter 

DIT E-590 

Directed Reading on Selected Topics 

Minogue TBAr Upon Request 

WORLD MISSION STUDIES 
I. THEOLOGY, FOUNDATIONS 
AND DYNAMICS OF MISSION 

CTU W-535 

Development of the Christian Community 

After a brief survey of the biblical /theological 
basis, this seminar type course emphasizes the 
sociological factors that bear on the process of 
Christian community formation and its relation- 
ship to community development on the socio- 
economic plane. 
Boberg TTh 12-1: 15 Winter 



88 



Ministry Studies 

II. MISSION IN PARTICULAR 
SITUATIONS 

NBTS M-375 
Missiology 

This course is designed to introduce the global 
mission of God in the world and the unique role 
of the church and the individual Christian in 
that mission. Participants will examine contem- 
porary missiological issues from historical, 
theological, geographical and organizational 
perspectives. There is an expectation that par- 
ticipants will also acquire resources for a 
responsible local church mission strategy. 
Bakke TTh 11 -12:15 Winter 

LSTC W-511 

The Kingdom of God and the Unreached : 

Missiological Issues in the Eighties 

The publication of fresh missiological essays 
and the continuing tradition of holding major 
world conferences on mission and evanglization 
(from 1910 to 1980) reveal some convergences 
but also sharp divergences on crucial theological 
issues and points of mission practice: global in- 
terdependence, the rise of third world 
missiologies, radical fluctuations in the world 
socio-political context, and further dimensions. 
The aim of the course is to make a critical 
evaluation of the field of missiology today in its 
ecumenical Protestant, evangelical and Roman 
Catholic streams, and to examine its probable 
future directions. Major texts and authors will 
be studied and such problems as missiological 
goals, ecclesiology, inter-religous dialogue, 
liberation theology, and ecumenical relations 
will be treated. A previous background of 
missiological study or experience is assumed. 
Scherer T 7 - 10 Winter 



CTU W-592 

Lakota Belief, Ritual and Spirituality 

This seminar will explore some aspects of this 
belief, ritual and spirituality of the traditional 
religion of the Sioux Indians of South Dakota. 
An important dimension of this study will be 
the close examination of the effects of western 
society and missionary approaches on the 
Dakota people, their culture and way of life. 
The seminar participants will be expected to 
develop a group project (An optional field trip 
to South Dakota will be arranged). 
Barbour T 7 - 9:30 p.m. Winter 



World Mission Studies 
III. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MISSION 

MTS M-427 

Hispanic Ministry Travel Seminar 

The purpose of this seminar is to acquaint 
students with some aspects of Hispanic ministry 
in the Southwest. Hispanic churches and 
Hispanic community organizations will be 
visited followed by reflection regarding ministry 
with Hispanics and the Church's role. This is a 
12 day seminar including travel. 
Armendariz TBA Winter 

CTU W-530 

Research Seminar in Area Studies 

Individually guided reading program in the 

history and culture of specific countries, as well 

as their present social, economic and religious 

situation. 

Boberg/Staff TBAr Winter 



CTU W-497 

Mission Integration Seminar 



See 



A 67 



MINISTRY: ITS NATURE 
AND PRACTICE 

I. THE NATURE OF MINISTRY 

BTS M-370 

Theology and Ministry 

This course will focus on the methods of 
ministry in preaching, worship, education, 
pastoral care, and administration. Students will 
plan, implement, and evaluate ministry in each 
of these areas. Representative skills for each 
area will be identified and taught. Students will 
develop an integrated view of ministry and a 
unique perspective in each type of ministry. 
Poling/ Miller TTh 9:30-10:50 Win ter 

CTU M-413 

Jesus of Nazareth. A Look at His Spirituality 

Based on the twentieth-century research into the 
personality and history of Jesus, this course will 
attempt to give a fresh understanding of the 
spiritual experience of Jesus as a source of in- 
spiration for the spirituality of his disciples. 
Topics will include: the Ruah and Abba ex- 
periences; a life oriented towards the Kingdom; 
discerning God in Faith; announcing, revealing, 
healing, eating and drinking with the outcast; 
the cross; the history and present understanding 
of the 'imitatio Christi' A personal journal of 
readings and reflections will be required. 
Lozano TTh 12-1: 15 Winter 



89 



Ministry Studies 



CTS CM-431 

Minister as Spiritual Director 

An examination and experience of ministry as 
spiritual direction. In addition to exploring 
theoretical issues relating to Christian 
spirituality and personal formation, students 
will offer and receive spiritual direction. 
Moore W9-.30- 12:20 Winter 

CTU M-592 

Religious Values in Effective Personal Leadership 

A 15-week action program in the dynamics of 
developing personal and ministerial leadership 
within the context of Judaeo-Christian values. 
Besides the development of positive attitudes 
and self-motivation, this course enables par- 
ticipants to translate into action internalized 
values through the process of self-evaluation, 
value clarification, goal setting, and personal 
plan of action. Weekly discussions and monthly 
workshops. Audio-visual fee. 
Spilly TBAr Winter 

II. MINISTRY, CHURCH 
AND SOCIETY 

MTS M-301 

The Contexts of Ministry 

(One unit of credit for all three quarters: see 

course description, Fall, Ministry, Church and 

Society). 

Armendariz & Others F 2- 3:30 Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

NBTS C-359 
Sociology of Religion 

Consideration of the classical and contemporary 
revisionists' sociological theories about religion. 
Critical study of the causes and effects, nature 
and roles, of religion — as a phenomenon — in 
society. Interpretative sociological analysis of 
various historical and contemporary religious 
movements. Special attention will be given to 
autochthonous expressions, popular religiosity, 
and movements of critical contestative in- 
tentionally. Emphasis on the students' in- 
vestigation of some of the phenomena for later 
exposition and discussion in class. Prerequisite: 
Introduction to Sociology equivalent or per- 
mission of the instructor. 
Mottesi WF 10:40 -12 Winter 



NBTS C-359H 

Sociology of Religion : An Hispanic Perspective 

Consideration of the classical and contemporary 
revisionists' sociological theories about religion. 
Critical studies of the causes and effects, nature 
and roles, of religion — as a phenomenon — in 
society. Interpretative sociological analysis of 
various historical and contemporary (or 
current?) Hispanic religious movements in the 
USA. Special attention will be given to 
autochthonous expressions, popular religiosity 
and movements of critical contestative in- 
tentionality among the Hispanic communities. 
Emphasis on the students' investigation of some 
of the phenomena for later exposition and 
discussion in class. 
Mottesi 16-9 Winter 

NBTS C-445 

Christianity and Culture in America : 

An Historical Perspective 

An inquiry into the interrelationship between 
Christianity and culture, through an 
examination of the ways in which Christianity 
has shaped various dimensions of American 
culture (such as its nationalism, political life, 
education, public morality and social reform), 
and ways in which American Christianity, in 
turn, has been shaped by environmental and 
sociological dynamics of the American context 
(such as the frontier, Civil Religion, etc.) 
Ohlmann WF8-9-.20 Winter 

NBTS M-464 

Ministry in Lombard : A Seminar in 

Community Exegesis and Ministry Design 

Participants will explore the community areas 
adjacent to the campus geographically, socially, 
politically, economically, ideologically, racially, 
and ecclesiastically, then work at developing 
community based ministry strategies for student 
involvements that are theologically significant, 
socially sensitive and ecclesiologically ap- 
propriate. 
Bakke M 1:10 -3:40 Winter 

BTS M-494 

The Church in the 80's 

This seminar will explore, within 

denominational and larger church perspectives, 

such current issues as biblical authority, 

ecumenicity, stewardship and life-style, justice 

and nonviolence, evangelism and church 

growth, and minorities and the church. 

Groff/Neff W7 -9:45 p.m. Win ter 



90 



Pastoral Care 



Ministry Studies 



NBTS M-378A, B, C 
Contemporary Evanglism Strategies 

An intensive introduction to current trends and 
opportunities in evangelism offered in con- 
nection with the annual February Evangelism 
Conference. Pre-conference reading, full-time 
conference participation and critique, and a 
reflection paper are required. Stu ^ents may elect 
to register for all three years as a substitute for 
M-377, the basic evangelism requirement. 
Conference themes are: 

1980— Evangelism and Church Growth (378A) 
1981— Evangelism and Discipleship (378B) 
1982— Evangelism and Ministry (378C) 
(One credit hour each) 
Bakke Feb. 21 - 23 Winter 

III. CHURCH ORGANIZATION, 
ADMINISTRATION AND GROWTH 

NBTS M-372 

Church Administration 

The course explores the concept of the ministry 
and its duties. The organization and program of 
the local church receives attention in its 
relationship to the community, the 
denomination, and the world mission. 
Goddard Th2:30-5 Win ter 

CTS CH-390 

An Inquiry into Methodism 

A study of the history, theology, and polity of 

Methodism from Wesley to the present. Offered 

in two parts in alternate winter terms: A) 

History and Doctrines of Methodism; B) Polity 

and Its Significance. 

Manschreck/ Blackwell Th 6:30 -9:30 Winter 

Moore 

PASTORAL CARE 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS M-310 

Introduction to Pastoral Care 

The purpose of this course is to lead the student 
toward a basic understanding of the meaning 
and practice of pastoral care. The course will 
focus on the various models and styles of 
pastoral care that have existed historically and 
are active in the Church today. The course is 
designed to help the student acquire what she or 
he needs to begin learning pastoral care in ac- 
tual practice in such settings as field education, 



clinical pastoral education, advanced courses 
with experiential components, internships, and 
the pastoral ministry itself. 
Ashby M 7 - 9:50 p.m. Winter 

II. PASTORAL COUNSELING 

CTU M-405 

Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

(For course description see Fall, Pastoral Coun- 
seling). 

Mallonee TTh9-10:15 Fall 

Mallonee MW 9 -10:15 Winter 

Mallonee MW 9 -10:15 Spring 

CTU M-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

(For course description see Fall, Pastoral Coun- 
seling). 

Szura TBAr Fall 

Szura TBAr Winter 

Szura TBAr Spring 

NBTS M-395 

Fundamentals of Pastoral Counseling 

Counseling is an integral part of the pastor's 
ministry. Every pastor should be familiar with 
the fundamental aspects of pastoral counseling, 
and attempt to become a skilled counselor. The 
course will emphasize 1) the philosophical, 
theological, sociological and psychological basis 
of counseling, 2) the pastor as a counselor, 3) 
the client and 4) basic types of counseling. As 
an introductory course the range of subjects will 
be wide, and depth will be left for other courses. 
Taylor WF2-.10-3 :30 Winter 

CTU M-506 

Advanced Seminar in Pastoral Counseling 

Prerequisites: 1) M-405 or equivalent, 2) 
student is already in an ongoing counseling 
relationship. The students will present their 
counseling practice to the seminar using tapes, 
verbatims, case reports. Reading will be 
assigned relevant to the cases. Enrollment 
limited (6). Prior consent of instructor required 
for admission. Audio-visual fee. 
Mallonee TBAr Winter 



III. SELECTED TOPICS IN 
PASTORAL CARE 

CTU M-402 

Theological Topics in Jungian Thought 

A survey of the structure of the psychology of 



91 



Pastoral Care 



Liturgy and Worship 



Carl Jung is followed by the identification and 
exploration of its theological implications and 
relevance. Special attention will be paid to the 
topic of symbol — in Jung and in comparison to 
its treatment by other thinkers. 
Szura MW 12-1: 15 Winter 

CTS CM-431 

Minister as Spiritual Director 

An examination and experience of ministry as 
spiritual direction, in addition to exploring 
theoretical issues relating to Christian 
spirituality and personal formation. Students 
will offer and receive spiritual direction. 
Moore W 9:30 -12:20 Winter 

CTS CM-439 

Aging and the Human Spirit 

A study of the phenomenon of aging, in- 
terweaving biblical, historical, and theological 
perspectives in relation to social scientific 
studies with a view to discerning their practical 
implications for church and ministry. 
LeFevre W 6:30 -9:30 Win ter 

CTS TEC-561 

Psychopathology in Theological Perspective 

A seminar designed to assist the advanced 
student in the task of pastoral diagnostics. A 
phenomenological examination of 

psychopathology will be the occasion for 
theological reflection on the nature and 
dynamics of alienation, sin, and evil as manifest 
in human personality. This course should be 
especially helpful for students with focused in- 
terest in pastoral counseling or spiritual direc- 
tion. 
Moore M 6:30 -9:30 Winter 

DIT M-556, 557, 558 
Pastoral Care of the Aged 

The course involves training in geriatric care. 
The program seeks to minister to the social and 
religious needs of the aged. 
Ulrich TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

NBTS M-496 
Marriage Enrichment 

Marriage will be explored from both the 
theoretical and the personal-experimental per- 
spectives. Specific content areas will be 
discussed, but will place equal emphasis upon 
improving the process of communication by 
which problems are confronted. Issues will be 



examined such as: cultural roles and ex- 
pectations for marriage and the family (secular 
and Christian); improving the communication 
skills of listening, expressing oneself effectively, 
and resolving conflict; enriching sexual com- 
munication; the importance of planning both 
for the individual and the couple. In part of 
each session, we will divide into two small 
groups for couples to explore their own relation- 
ship on an experimental level. The course is 
limited to couples, married or engaged. 
Prerequisites: Fundamentals of Counseling and 
Marriage and Family Counseling. 
Taylor 17 -9:30 p.m. Winter 

LSTC M-521 

Marriage and Family Counseling 

A course aimed at the preparation of the pastor 
for his or her predominant type of counseling. 
Attention will be directed to theories and prac- 
tices in present-day conjoint and family 
therapies. Some consideration will be given to 
pre-marital education, divorce, sexuality, and 
the sociology of marriage. Limited enrollment; 
admission by approval of instructor. 
Prerequisite: LSTC M-320 or equivalent. 
Swanson MW8-9.30 Winter 

DIT M-560, 561, 562 
Pastoral Care of the Family 

The course involves a series of training sessions 
in family counseling, and on-sight involvement 
with troubled families. The counselors work in 
mixed pairs so as to facilitate group interaction. 
Staff TBAr Fall/ Winter /Spring 



CCTS M-592 

Personality: Theories and Therapies 



Swanson 



F 9 -12 noon 

LITURGY AND WORSHIP 

I. INTRODUCTORY 



WinterS}%. 



LSTC M-380 

Ministry in Worship (Teaching Parish) 

This course aims to provide the student with an 
introduction to liturgical methodology, an 
historical overview of Christian worship, a 
familiarity with the liturgical and hymnological 
materials in the Lutheran Church, the bases for 
developing worship practices in the parish, and 
guidance in the formation of a presidential, 
ministerial style. Practice will aid the student in 
worship planning, coordination, and leadership. 
Staff TTh 11 -12:15 Winter 



92 



II. LITURGICAL LEADERSHIP 



Liturgy and Worship 
IV. HISTORY OF LITURGY 



MTS M-416 

Helping the People Engage in Corporate 

Worship 

Through a historical survey of worship leader- 
ship, we establish an understanding of the kind 
of leadership that enables meaningful corporate 
participation in worship. We then experiment 
with processes for helping the community 
engage in corporate worship through such entry 
points as liturgical teams, an educative worship 
committee, officers' training, involving children 
in the liturgy, rites of passage, architectural 
change, congregational singing, and the people's 
participation in preaching and the Sacraments. 
(Permission of Instructor Required) 
Wardlaw MW 10 -11: 50 Win ter 

NBTS M-493 

Preaching and Worship in the Church 

To relate creatively the insights of theology and 
biblical studies to preaching and worship. At- 
tention will be given to shaping a theology of 
preaching and worship, assessing the place of 
preaching and worship to the people of the 
congregation, evaluating our preaching and 
worship in terms of our total ministry and the 
particular congregations we serve, and planning 
a series of sermons and worship events reflective 
of our research. 
Blanford WF8-9.20 Win ter 

III. SACRAMENTS 

CTU T-455 
Initiation 

Beginning with the story of con- 
version/initiation as told in literary and per- 
sonal accounts and in liturgical text (the Lenten 
Lectionary and the Rites of Initiation), thiscourse 
moves to biblical, liturgical and theological 
reflection on the experience and sacraments of 
Christian initiation. 

Keifer TTh 10 -.30 - 11 : 45 Fall 

Ostdiek MW 1:30 -2:45 Winter 

DIT M-462 
The Eucharist 

This study of the Eucharist draws from its 
biblical, historical and liturgical theological 
meaning; it focuses on its liturgical setting in 
the Church. Official Catholic dogmatic 
teachings are treated in this same context. 
Arceneaux WF 10:10-11 Winter 



V. PRAYER 

DIT M-430 

The Liturgy of Hours 

This study focuses on the meaning of the 
Liturgy of Hours in the Church, drawing from 
the teaching of Vatican II, the General In- 
struction on the Liturgy of Hours and the 
historical development of this prayer form in 
the Catholic Church up to our present day. 
Arceneaux T 9:10 -10 Winter 

CTU M-516 

Practicum : Leadership of Prayer 

A practicum in prayer leadership for students 
not anticipating ordination. Such students can 
achieve competency in liturgical presidency 
through this practicum. Audio-visual fee. 
Hughes W 7 -9:30p.m. Winter 

DIT M-534 

Parochial Liturgical Celebrations 

A study of the preparation for and celebration 
of liturgies in parishes; this course treats of such 
particulars as pre-baptismal catechesis for 
parents and godparents, preparation of parents 
and children for first Eucharist, first Penance, 
Confirmation; time is spent researching and 
discussing resources such as books, programs, 
films, etc. 
Arceneaux M Winter 

VI. MUSIC 

M/L M-365 

Music in the Church 

A study of the philosophy and practice of music 
in the worship and life of local congregations. 
Different denominational traditions will be ex- 
plored. Building a singing tradition, hymnody 
past and present, creating and nurturing choirs, 
finding and choosing musical leadership, and 
the roles of the ministers are among the topics 
for special attention. 
Moore Th eve. Winter 



VII. SELECTED TOPICS 



CTU T-550 

Area Studies in Worship : 

Great Books in Liturgy 

(For course description 



Fall, liturgy and 



93 



Liturgy and Worship 



Preaching and Communication 



Worship). 






Staff 




TBAr Fall 


Staff 




TBAr Spring 


Staff 




TBAr Winter 


DIT M-590 






Directed Research 




(For course 


descrip 


tion see Fall, Liturgy and 


Worship). 






Arceneaux 




TBAr Upon Request 



PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

I. FOUNDATIONAL COURSES 

DIT M-302 

Ministry of Preaching 

The goal of this course is to learn a model for 
sermon composition; to study various types of 
sermons; to look at models of various types of 
sermons; then compose and deliver them. There 
will also be input and discussion of the meaning 
of preaching (theology). 
Staff W 1-1:50 Winter 

LSTC M-340 

Ministry in Preaching (Teaching Parish) 

The purpose of this course is to help the begin- 
ner to understand the nature of preaching and 
to establish sound practice in the first essentials 
of sermon production; to evaluate the message, 
achieve unity, plan the strategy, develop the 
ideas, use language. The end in views is to unite 
practice with critical judgment. Format of the 
course includes lectures, readings, and 
discussion, writing and preaching sermons. 
Niedenthal TTh 8-9:45 Winter 

CTU M-450A, B 

Preaching as Verbal Communication 

(See course description, Fall, Preaching and 

Communication) . 

Hughes A, B Seminar M 12 - 1 Fall 

ALabM3-5 Winter 

B Lab W 12- 2 Spring 

II. AREA STUDIES IN PREACHING 

MTS M-417 

Learning to Preach in Community 

(For description see Fall Quarter). Half-credit 

per Quarter. 

Wardlaw ,. TBA Winter 



DIT M-300 

Oral Interpretation of Biblical Literature 

The goal of this course is to teach the principles 
of oral interpretation; principles of delivery; 
analysis of literature; and vocal production, 
with a view to ministry of reader and sub- 
sequent ministries in the Church. 
Staff Ml -1:50 Winter 

BTS M-476 

Practicum in Biblical Preaching 

A workshop approach to exegetical skills as it 
leads to communication, the writing of sermons, 
and the delivery of sermons. The student will 
have the opportunity to test several styles of 
homiletic method. 
Snyder/ Faus TTh 8-9:20 Winter 

LSTC M-456 

Novels and Sermons of Frederick Buechner 

A seminar which investigates the language, 
form, and theological implication of the stories 
and sermons of the contemporary novelist and 
preacher, Frederick Buechner. Limited 
enrollment; admission by approval of in- 
structor. 
Nieden thai T 2:30 -5 Win ter 

EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS M-313 

The Teaching Ministry of the Church 

A study of the teaching ministry of the church 
with attention to historical perspectives, 
educational theory, patterns of objectives, ad- 
ministrative procedures, and styles of teaching 
with a variety of age groups and situations. 
Priester MW4-5-.50 Win ter 



CTU M-463 




Resources in Religious Education 




(See course description Fall, 


Educational 


Ministry of the Church). 




Lucinio Th 10:30-1 


Fall 


Th 10:30-1 


Winter 



II. ADMINISTRATION 
AND METHODS 

NBTS M-383 

Teaching Methods and Practice 

Practicum for planning, executing, 



and 



94 



Supervised Ministry 



Educational Ministry 



evaluating teaching/learning situations, and for 

experimenting with a variety of teaching styles 

and techniques. Video evaluations of on-site 

teaching. 

Morris TBAr Winter 

LSTC M-490 

Church Administration 

A study of church polity and administration in 
the Lutheran Church from the historical and 
practical perspectives. Principles of 
organizational development will be used to 
study the policies and administrative life of the 
church and the functioning of the pastor and the 
laity. 
Bozeman TTh 8:30- 9:45 Winter 

III. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
AND THE LIFE CYCLE 

MTS M-404 

The Teaching Ministry with Children 

Studies in alternative ways to minister with 

children in the church. Attention will be given 

to programs of teaching, factors of growth and 

development, peer relationships, family and 

school. 

Priester/Wehrheim W 7 -9:50p.m. Winter 

NBTS M-484 
Ministry With Youth 

A study of adolescent psychology with an em- 
phasis on the religious development of youth, 
and evaluation of styles of youth ministry, 
resources, and youth culture. A field experience 
in a retreat setting with youth will seek to 
develop program planning and communication 
skills. Prerequisite: Teaching Ministry of the 
Church. 
Jenkins/ Amidon 7 -9:30 p.m. Winter 



%**%#> 



IV. PERSPECTIVES ON 
EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 

CTS CM-427 

Christian Education for Social Transformation 

An examination of the relationship of education 
to liberation, and of liberation education to the 
theology of liberation. Particular attention will 
be given to Paulo Freire's distinction between 
education as a liberator and domesticator. The 
role of the church within liberation will be 
examined. 
Seymour T2-5 Winter 

CANON LAW 

DIT M-320 

Introduction, Fundamental Law, General Norms 

The course treats the meaning of law, law and 
freedom, the place of law and of church law in 
one's life as a Christian, the methodology of ap- 
plying canon law in practice, legislators in the 
Church, subjects of church law, dispensation, 
release from legal obligation, and the relation- 
ship between western law and eastern churches. 
Parres MW 1-2:30 Win ter 

CTU M-421 

Church and Structure 

An introductory course in canon law, briefly 
treating the history of canon law, interpretation 
of law, general norms, diocesan and parish 
structures, the Roman See. Required for the 
M.Div. degree. 
Bogdan TTh 1:30-2:45 Win ter 

DIT M-421 

Legal Aspects of the Sacrament of Matrimony 

A canonical study of church law on marriage 

and of its present-day applications. 

Parres MWF8-.10-9 Win ter 



DIT M-584 

Practicum in Catechesis 

to High School Students 

(See course description, Fall, Educational 

Ministry and the Life Cycle). 

Staff TBAr Every Quarter 

DIT M-585 

Practicum in Catechesis to Special 

Education Students 

(See course description, Fall, Educational 

Ministry and the Life Cycle). 

Staff TBAr Every Quarter 



SUPERVISED MINISTRY 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS M-304, 305, 306 
The Practice of Ministry 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Jarvis TBA Fall 304 

Winter 305 
Spring 306 



95 



Supervised Ministry 



DIT M-341, 342 

Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

Varied experience in helping activities as spon- 
sored by social and community organizations in 
the Chicago area. Full working day, once each 
week, in centers participating in care offered 
varied ethnic groups living in disadvantaged cir- 
cumstances. Guidance in work with youth, 
adults, aged, given by agencies' staff personnel. 
Reports and supervisory seminar at DeAndreis 
once each week. 
Ulrich TBAr Winter/Spring 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 
Basic Ministry Practicum 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Staff TBAr Fall 380 

Winter 385 
Spring 390 

CTU M-517 
Reconciliation Practicum 

This practicum includes seminar briefings and 
lab sessions designed to help the student in- 
tegrate the theological, interpersonal, moral, 
canonical, and liturgical dimensions of the 
ministry of reconciliation and move toward com- 
petency in this ministry. Open to 3rd and 4th 
year students. Audio-visual fee. 
Ostdiek T 7 - 9.30 p.m. Winter 

Ostdiek TTh 1:30-2: 45 Spring 

II. ADVANCED 

MTS M-405 

Field Education Seminar 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Jarvis TBAr Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

CTU M-480, 481, 482 

Advanced Ministry Practicum : Religious 

Education 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

lucinio TBAr Fall 480 

Winter 481 
Spring 482 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 
Advanced Ministry Practicum : 
Spirituality 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 



Ministry). 
Lozano 



TBAi 



Fall 483 
Winter 484 
Spring 485 



CTU M-486, 487, 488 

Advanced Ministry Practicum : Worship 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Keifer . TBAr Fall 486 

Winter 487 
Spring 488 

CTU M-489, 490, 491 
Advanced Ministry Practicum : 
Community Development 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Boberg TBAr Fall 489 

Winter 490 
Spring 491 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 
Advanced Ministry Practicum : 
Social Justice 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Szura TBAr Fall 492 

Winter 493 
Spring 494 

CTU M-518 
Worship Practicum 

This seminar and series of lab sessions (not held 
during class time) will help the candidate for or- 
dination to the priesthood develop a celebration 
style for sacramental worship, especially 
Eucharist. Audio-visual fee. 
Keifer TTh 1:30-2:45 Winter 

Ostdiek T7 -9:30p.m. Spring 

DIT M-540 

Intensive Clinical Pastoral Education 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Supervisor TBAr Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

DIT M-541, 542, 543 

Pastoral Care Through Ministerial Supervision 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Staff TBAr Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



96 



Supervised Ministry 



DIT M-550, 551, 552 
The Ministry Education 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Clark TBA Fall 550 

Winter 551 
Spring 552 

DIT M-553, 554, 555 

Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Ulrich TBA Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



CCTS PRACTICA 



CCTS M-620A, B,C P r a c t i c u m 

Congregational Care 



CCTS M-622A-F 



Practicum in Marriage 
and Family Counseling 



CCTS M-624A-F 



Practicum in Pastoral 
Psycholtherapy 



CCTS M-626A, B, C Practicum in Group 
Work and Group Coun- 
seling 



CCTS M-628A, B, C Practicum in Geriatric 
Pastoral Care 



CCTS M-630A, B, C Practicum in Drug Use 
and Abuse 



CCTS M-634A, B, C Practicum in Religion and 
Medicine 



CCTS M-636A, B, C Practicum in Community 
Mental Health 



CCTS M-638A, B, C Practicum in Clinical 
Pastoral Education 



(For course description see Fall, Supervised 
Ministry). 

INTERDISCIPLINARY/ 
INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 



97 



Old Testament 



SPRING 1981 

BIBLICAL STUDIES 

OLD TESTAMENT 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC B-312 

Old Testament Studies III 

A survey course covering the biblical books 

other than the Pentateuch and the Prophets; the 

Intertestamental literature; Old Testament her- 

meneutics; and a brief introduction to the 

Talmud. 

Fuerst, Michel MWF9-9-.50 Spring 

NBTS B-325 

Old Testament III : Theology 

This course concentrates on the ideas of the 
various sections of the Old Testament as ex- 
pressions of Israelite religion, and as precursors 
to Christianity. Major trends in modern study 
are weighed and consulted. 
Bjornard TTh 9:30 - 10:50 Spring 

DIT B-443 

Old Testament Survey II 

This course continues the work of B-442. 

Prerequisites: B-341 and B-442. 

Fischer MWF9:10-10 Spring 

II. CANONICAL CORPUS 

CTU B-400 
Pentateuch 

Pentateuchal traditions, including the primeval 
history, patriarchs, Exodus, Sinai and wilder- 
ness wanderings, are studied in the context of 
their literary origins and development and in the 
light of their importance for Old Testament 
religion and theology. Emphasis will be on the 
analysis of selected passages and their ap- 
plicability to contemporary doctrinal, ethical or 
pastoral questions. 
Bergant MW 12 -1:15 Spring 



LSTC B-511 
Genesis 1-11 

A study of Genesis 1-11, the purpose and func- 
tion of these narratives in the Bible, and their 
relationship to other Ancient Near Eastern 
literature. 
Michel 17-10 Spring 

CTS CH-410 

Exegesis of the Old Testament II 

An exegetical study of an Old Testament book 
or part thereof. The knowledge of Hebrew is 
not a prerequisite, but reference is made in an 
understandable way to the original terminology 
of the text under consideration. In the Spring of 
1982 the book will be Amos. 
Lacocque MW 11 -12:20 Spring 

NBTS B-428 
Interpretation of Jeremiah 

This seminar type course approaches the book 
from the viewpoints of text, form, redaction, 
literature and homiletics, attempting to merge 
historical exegesis with a relevant message. 
Bjornard WF 10:40 -12 Spring 

LSTC B-512 
Studies in Jeremiah 

Consideration of the content and message of the 

book, with attention given to critical problems 

and issues affecting Old Testament prophecy in 

general. 

Fuerst MWF 8 - 8 : 50 Spring 

CTU B-420A, B 
Psalms 

Select Psalms will be studied from each literary 
or liturgical category for an analysis of their 
language, form and theology. Their lastingworth 
to Israel, to the New Testament church and to 
us will be explored. Helpful for students of 
liturgy and spirituality or for a review of Old 
Testament religion. 

Stuhlmueller Sec. A: TTh 10:30 - 11:45 Spring 
Stuhlmueller Sec. B: T 7 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 



MTS B-441 
Exodus 

A study of the Book of Exodus, with special at- 
tention to (1) the relation between narrative and 
legal forms in the book and (2) the relations be- 
tween archaeology, history, and biblical 
theology for understanding the book and its im- 
pact. Hebrew is not required, but opportunity 
will be provided for its use. 
Boling TTh 10-11:50 Spring 



CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside 
world will be investigated for direction in the 
world mission of the Church today. In the Old 
Testament special attention will be devoted to 
the cultural and moral interdependency of Israel 
with the nations as well as to such motifs as 
election, universal salvation and monotheism. 
New Testament study will focus on the mission 



98 



New Testament 

of Jesus and its interpretation in the theologies 
of selected Gospels, Pauline Letters and other 
New Testament writings. 
Bergant/ Senior MW 9 -10:15 Spring 



Old Testament 

is given to the interrelationship of archaeology, 
history, and Old Testament religion. Requisite: 
B-301 and/ or B-302 or equivalent. 
Campbell T 2-4:50 Spring 



III. THEOLOGY 



VI. HEBREW LANGUAGE 



BTS B-325 

Old Testament Theology 

The class will explore the various approaches to 
doing a theology of the Old Testament. The 
special emphasis will be on kerygmatic 
theology. The course will conclude by 
discussing the relationship between the Old 
Testament and the New Testament and the 
unity of the Old Testament. 
Roop WF 10:40 -12 Spring 

CTS CH-402 

Theology of the Old Testament II 

An inquiry into the narratives of Genesis 1-11 : 
in particular, and of other parts of the Old 
Testament in general. The narrative as a literary 
genre, its origins, its rationale, its aims. Sym- 
bolism, metaphor, myth, paradigm. A quest for 
hermeneutical principles in dealing with that 
type of tradition in Israel. 
Lacocque T 6:30 -9:30 Spring 

IV. HERMENEUTICS OR 
RABBINICS 



CCTS B-453 

Current Issues in Jewish-Christian Dialogue 



The 2,000 year-old history of Jewish-Christian 
encounter has taken many forms and has led to 
varied results in accord with historical cir- 
cumstances. This course will undertake a con- 
sideration of a wide range of Jewish and 
Christian issues which intersect sometimes in 
understanding and sometimes in confrontation. 
Study of topics such as election, messianism, 
peoplehood and the land, Zionism, an- 
tisemitism, and missionary purpose, using 
historical as well as contemporary documents. 
Perelmuter/ Sherman M 7 - 10 Spring 

V. OLD TESTAMENT WORLD 

MTS B-471 

The Archaeology of Palestine and the Bible 

An exploration of the findings of archaeology in 
Palestine as they pertain to the Bible. Attention 



NBTS B-311C 
Hebrew III 

See description B-311A, Fall Section of the 

Catalog. 

TBA TWFl:10-2 Spring 

NEW TESTAMENT 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

BTS B-330 

Introduction to the New Testament 

This course is designed to give the student an in- 
troduction to the life, times, and message of the 
New Testament as the basis for further study 
and use. The total range of backgrounds, con- 
text, text, canon, history of interpretation, and 
translation of the New Testament will come un- 
der study. 
Horning TTh8-9:20 Spring 

DIT B-502 

Parable and Miracle Traditions in the Gospels 

A study of the literary forms of parable and 
miracle story in the New Testament, their 
nature, purpose, and challenge to early 
Christianity and for today's Christian. Guided 
reading and exegesis work will be expected on 
one passage involving each literary form. 
VanLinden M Spring 

LSTC B-332 
Pauline Tradition 

A study of the composition and content of the 
genuine Pauline epistles, placing them within 
their historical setting. Basic theological and 
ethical themes of Paul will be investigated. 
Linss, Norquist MWF 8-8:50 Spring 

NBTS B-332 

The Meaning of Paul for Today 

Introduction to the background and life of Paul, 
as well as the history of Pauline interpretation. 
Interpretation of the Epistle to the Romans and 
selections from various other epistles of Paul. 
The significance of Paul for faith and life. 
Guelich WF8-9-.20 Spring 



99 



New Testament 



II. BOOKS OF THE 
NEW TESTAMENT 

CTU B-430 

The Gospel According to Matthew 

A study of the content, structure, and major 
motifs of the Gospel of Matthew. Particular at- 
tention will be given to the evangelist's role as 
an interpreter of tradition and history for a 
community in transition. The course will con- 
sider the theological and ministerial relevance of 
Matthew's message for such questions as Church 
authority and ethics. 
Senior M 7 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU B-440 

The Gospel According to John 

The gospel will be studied according to its 
distinctive style and theology, its overall struc- 
ture and content. Key sections will be used to 
highlight such major Johannine motifs as 
religious symbolism, Sacraments, community 
and spirituality. 

Senior MW 1:30 -2:45 Fall 

Karris MW 1:30 -2:45 Spring 

DIT B-451 
Johannine Literature 

A study of the Gospel of John and of the 
Epistles called Johannine. The course will con- 
sider the literary and theological basis of Johan- 
nine writings and their main theological 
teaching. Prerequisites: B-341 and Survey of 
New Testament. 
VanLinden MWF9-.10-10 Spring 

MTS B-404 

Paul's First Letter to the Corinthians 

This epistle is particularly notable for the way 
in which Paul writes theologically in the context 
of specific problems facing an early Christian 
community. Our task, therefore, will be both 
exegetical and hermeneutical : to seek un- 
derstanding of the letter in its original setting 
and to move on toward appreciation of it in 
terms of our own life and world. 
Reeves MW2-3-.50 Spring 

BTS B-531 
Romans 

An exegetical and theological approach to the 
letter to the Romans with emphasis on the 
theological thought of Paul on the one hand and 
the function of Romans in the history of 



Christian doctrine on the other hand. The 
student will do work in both aspects and write 
integrative projects. 
Snyder/ Meyer TTh8-9:20 Spring 

III. NEW TESTAMENT THEOLOGY 

CTS CH-322 

Beginnings of Christian Theology 

A study of the history and thought of early 
Christianity from the emergence of the resurrec- 
tion faith to the early decades of the Second 
Century. 
Scroggs TTh 11 - 12:20 Spring 

LSTC B-400 

New Testament Theology 

Although the New Testament will be considered 
in its unity, the theology must be studied ac- 
cording to its major representatives: Jesus, 
Paul, Synoptic Gospels, John. The secondary 
sources for this study will be the New 
Testament theologies by Bultmann, Kummel, 
and others. 
Linss MW 1-2:15 Spring 

CTU B-452 

Pauline Theology and Writings 

The life and thought of Paul in his cultural and 
theological setting. Study of such Pauline motifs 
as law and freedom, charism and Spirit, death 
and resurrection. Church and apostleship — and 
their import for the contemporary church. 
Karris TTh 9 -10:15 Fall 

Karris MW 10:30 - 11 :45 Spring 

MTS B-422 

Sacramental Thought and Experience in the 
New Testament 

In this course we will consider the origins of the 
early Christian practices of baptism and Lord's 
Supper. We will study the diverse in- 
terpretations given these practices in the earliest 
oral tradition and by various writers of books in 
the New Testament and of a few other early 
Christian writings. The emphasis will be on the 
role of metaphor, symbol and myth in these in- 
terpretations and the religious experiences they 
imply. The early Christian texts will be com- 
pared and contrasted with texts of the 
Hellenistic mystery religions. An important 
aspects of the course will be the part played by 
feminine and masculine symbols in sacramental 



100 



New Testament 



thought and experience. Prerequisite: In- 
troductory work in the gospels and in Paul. 
Collins W 2 -4:50 Spring 



DIT B-590 
Special Topics 

Staff 



TBAr 



Upon Request 



munity, so as to correspond to God's creation 
and promise. This course presupposes some 
acquaintance with such human development 
materials as those which can be gained either in 
The Development of Conscience or The 
Covenant in Biblical Tradition. 
Meyer TTh 9:30 - 10:50 Spring 



CTS CH-615 

The Social World of the First Believers in Jesus 

A graduate seminar which will study the 
economic, political, and socio-religious world in 
which Jews in Palestine lived in the first century 
c.e. and out of which emerged Jesus, his 
followers, and the communities which remained 
loyal to him after his death. By "social world" is 
meant the total perspective which formed the 
Weltanschauung of this culture (i.e., the 
'realworld'), made up of inseparable units such 
as social, economic, and religious status, the ef- 
fects of alienation from material and social 
goods, and the functions of theological 
ideology. Particular use will be made of the ap- 
proaches of the sociology of the religious sect 
and the sociology of knowledge. Prerequisites: 
Basic work in New Testament, working 
knowledge of Greek and /or Hebrew, and con- 
sent of instructor. 
Scroggs TBAr Spring 

LSTC B-442 

Resurrection in the New Testament 

(for course description see p. 80) 



NBTS B-530 
Sermon on the Mount 

A seminar study involving an understanding of 
the kingdom of God and the ethical 
teachings of Jesus. Research projects and student 
interchange will be emphasized. 

Guelich/ Snyder TTh 11 - 12:15 Spring 



V. EXEGESIS & METHODOLOGY 

CTU B-599 
M.A. Seminar 

This course prepares students for researching 
and writing their M.A. theses on biblical topics. 
The major focus will be methodological, direc- 
ting students in the use of primary and secon- 
dary sources and in styles of exegesis. The con- 
tent of the course will be determined by the 
specialization of the students involved in the 
course. While one professor guides the general 
orientation of the course, the expertise of the 
other members of the department will be called 
upon when necessary. 
Hoppe W 7 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 



IV. NEW TESTAMENT ETHICS 



v LSTC B-450 
y Studies in New Testament Ethics 

A study of selected ethical concerns found in the 
New Testament, such as wealth, poverty, the 
state, work, marriage and divorce, the Christian 
family, the relation of male and female, 
homosexuality, peace, law, violence, justice. 
Students will have an opportunity to work in 
areas of their special interest. 
Norquist TF 1-2:15 Spring 

BTS B-455 
Biblical Ethics 

This course looks to biblical narrative for 
values, contents, and norms which allow per- 
sons made "in the image of God" to in- 
tentionally fashion their understandings, 
judgments, and responses as covenant com- 



VI. NEW TESTAMENT WORLD 

MTS B-420- 

Jewish Apocalypticism 

Since the beginning of this century, it has been 
generally recognized that Jewish apocalypticism 
was the living matrix within which the message 
of Jesus and the theology of the early Church 
took shape. In this course we will study the 
major Jewish apocalypses and portions of the 
Dead Sea Scrolls as responses to the problem of 
meaning in history and the existence of evil in 
the world. We will observe how traditional 
symbols and mythic elements were transformed 
to address a new situation. Prerequisite: In- 
troductory work in the Old Testament. 
Collins F9 -11:50 Spring 

CTU B-518 
Intertestamental Literature 

A seminar on Jewish literature from the Mac- 




101 



New Testament 



Historical Studies 



cabean period to the Bar Kochba revolt. Em- 
phasis will be placed on apocalyptic literature 
and the Dead Sea Scrolls as well as on the im- 
portance of these writings for understanding 
Christian origins and the development of the 
New Testament. Reading of primary sources in 
translation and discussion of them in their 
historical, cultural, and religious context. (With 
the consent of the instructor.) 
Hoppe TTh 1:30-2: 45 Spring 

VII. NEW TESTAMENT GREEK 

LSTC B-309B 

Greek Readings (cont'd) 

This course will conclude the study of Greek 
grammar, based on the reading of selected parts 
of the Greek New Testament. 
Linss MWF9-9:50 Spring 

BTS B-316C 
Greek 

(For course description see Fall, New 

Testament.) 

Barton TWF 1:10-2 Spring 

NBTS B-316C 

Elements of New Testament Greek III 

See description B-316A Fall Section of the 

Catalog. 

Barton TWF 1:10-2 Spring 



MTS B-421 

Intermediate New Testament Greek 

Requisite B324/325. 

Reeves TTh 8 -9:50 



and political structures). 
Young MW3- 



4:15 



Spring 



Spring 



HISTORICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTU H-307 
Christianization of Europe 

A study of the Church's encounter with the Bar- 
barian nations, of their conversion, and of the 
development of Christian life. An analysis of 
how the task affected Church life and thought 
and of how the Church affected the world. 
Major consideration will be given to: Medieval 
Missions, Charlemagne, the Papal States, the 
Schism between East and West, and the 
development and experience of a Christian 
European Culture (theology, philosophy, social 



CTU H-310 

Christian Reformation and 

Counter-Reformation History 

A study is made of the factors influencing the 
breakdown of the medieval synthesis. The 
development of the major reform traditions 
with the response of Rome before, during and 
after Trent is presented. Finally the impact of 
this division in Europe and the Church is con- 
sidered. Project and examinations. 
Nemer MW 10:30 - 11:45 Spring 

LSTC H-310A 

Ancient and Medieval Church History 

A study of the development of Christian prac- 
tice and theology. Special emphasis will be 
placed on the doctrines of God and Christ in the 
ancient church and on grace in the medieval 
church. Lectures, reading, reports and 
examinations. 
Staff TTh 11-12:15 Spring 

NBTS C-341 

Early and Medieval Christianity 

Issues and developments in Christian life and 
thought from the beginning of the second cen- 
tury to the Reformation are examined in order 
(1) to become familiar with the development of 
Christianity during the period, (2) to acquire 
some knowledge of historical methodology, and 
(3) to develop some ability at analyzing and in- 
terpreting religious movements. Regular and in- 
tensive reading, both in primary and secondary 
sources, is emphasized as a basis for meaningful 
classroom discussion. 
Ohlmann WF 10:40 -12 Spring 

LSTC H-350A 

American Church History 

The pluralistic development of religious ideas, 
movements and institutions in America from 
colonial times to the present. The course sur- 
veys the total religious milieu, including the rise 
of new religious movements. 
Scherer MWF 11 -11:50 Spring 

LSTC H-350B 

American Lutheran Church History 

A course focusing on Lutheranism in America, 
especially on the problem of unity and 
polarization. The historical development is 



102 



Historical Studies 



viewed against the broad background of 
Christianity in America. Aim of the course is to 
gain perspective on our present problems in the 
context of their emergence and development. 
(An alternative to LSTC H-350A.) 
Fischer MWF11-11:50 Spring 

DIT H-413 

History of the American Catholic Church 

A study of the background of present-day 
American Catholicism; the national groups that 
make it up, the problems which it has had to 
face and its response to those problems. 
Groves MWF8:10-9 Spring 

II. HISTORY OF PARTICULAR 
TRADITIONS 

NBTS 1-302 
Denominational Orientation 

This colloquium shall provide students with an 
exposure to personnel, polity, procedures and 
programs of their actual or potential 
denominational family (ABSUSA) by bringing 
that denominational family into meaningful en- 
counter with the seminary family. 
TBA T 2:10 -4:45 Spring 

BTS H-343 

History of the Church of the Brethren 

Analysis of the development of the Church of 
the Brethren from its sectarian beginnings in 
eighteenth-century Europe to its denominational 
position in twentieth-century America, with 
particular attention to its relationships with 
other Christian movements and its cultural en- 
vironment. 
Durnbaugh WF8-9-.20 Spring 

LSTC H-360 
Lutheran Heritage 

Content and scope of the Lutheran confessional 
writings and the manner in which they are nor- 
mative for Lutheran ministry and church life 
today. Recent confessional statements and 
results of inter-confessional dialogues are taken 
into account. 
Pero MW 1-2:15 Spring 

MTS H-430 

Seminar on Eastern Orthodox Christianity 

A survey of the history of Eastern Orthodoxy 
from the Byzantine period with special attention 



to selected theological motifs and problems. In- 
tensive Course. 
Rigdon TBAr Spring 

MTS H-431 

Traveling Seminar : Poland 

Traveling seminar on the life and work of the 
Churches in Eastern Europe: Focus for 1982 - 
Poland and the Soviet Union. At the invitation 
of the Roman Catholic Church in Poland, the 
Polish Ecumenical Council and the Moscow 
Patriarchate of the Russian Orthodox Church 
members of the McCormick seminar will travel 
throughout Poland and to several centers in the 
Soviet Union. The program will include visits to 
parishes, theological schools, monasteries and 
university Faculties where special lectures, in- 
terviews and discussions will be held. It is 
possible that the seminar will include a visit of 
several days to the Vatican in route home to 
Chicago. Intensive course. Prerequisite: H-430. 
Rigdon TBAr Spring 

BTS H-445 

The Intentional Community 

A study of religiously based communitarian 
movements in Christian history, focusing on 
such groups as the Hutterities, the Renewed 
Moravian Church, the Ephrata Community, the 
Shakers, Amana, the Hutterian Society of the 
Brothers, Koinonia Farm, and the Ecumenical 
Institute. 
Durnbaugh T 7 - 9:45 p.m. Spring 

CTU H-493 

History of Christian Spirituality : 

Modern and Contemporary 

A survey of the development of Christian 
spirituality from the seventeenth century on- 
ward, with special emphasis on the nineteenth 
and twentieth century. Particular emphasis will 
be given to the spirituality underlying the foun- 
dation of many religious communities in that 
period, and the origins of the liturgical, biblical 
and lay movements which prepared the way for 
Vatican II and contemporary understandings of 
spirituality. 
Lozano TTh 9 - 10:15 Spring 

III. HISTORY - INDIVIDUALS 

LSTC H-610 

Luther on Repentance and Grace 

Luther's own crisis centered on the church's 




103 



Historical Studies 



Theological Studies 



penetential system. His evangelical faith was a 
new understanding of the Gospel of God's grace 
in Christ. This graduate seminar will explore 
this whole theological and experiential complex, 
the heart of Luther's faith. Special attention is 
given to the tools and techniques of critical 
historical study. (For post-M.Div. students. Ad- 
mission of others only by approval of in- 
structor.) 
Fischer MW 1-2^15 Spring 

IV. AMERICAN CHURCH HISTORY 

NBTS M-369 

A History of Black Congregations and 

Denominations 

An historical look at several original Black 
congregations and at the denominations which 
developed from them: AME, AMEZ, CME, 
NBC- A, NBC-USA, PNBC. Attention will also 
be given to their polities and theologies, to their 
contemporary purposes and programs 
(ministries), and to their missionary and 
educational efforts. 
Blanford M 7 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU H-416 

American Catholic Experience : 1918 to Present 
Lectures and readings on the main problems and 
movements of the American Catholic com- 
munity with a special emphasis on the 20th cen- 
tury. The topics will include war, the problems 
of immigration, acculturation, and acceptance 
in the American society, social questions, 
education, Church and State, thought con- 
trasted before and after the Second Vatican 
Council. There will be bi-weekly reading reports 
on topics from an approved syllabus. Two 
weeks are allowed for the development of two 
essays synthesizing the lectures and the 
readings. 
Ross W7 -9:30 p.m. Spring 

V. SELECTED TOPICS 

CTU H-426 

The Growth of the Church in Asia and the 

South Pacific 

This course will examine the growth of 
Christianity in Asia and the South Pacific 
through the agency of various churches and 
mission socieities in the 19th and 20th centuries. 
The student chooses a particular country or 



church or missionary society for in-depth study. 
Nemer MW 1:30 -2:45 Spring 

CTS CH-493 

An Inquiry into Contemporary Judaism: 

The Holocaust: Roots and Response 

Study of a selected aspect of Jewish life and 
culture in the 20th century and an assessment of 
the Jewish experience and insight for today. 
Focus in 1982 will be on Elie Wiesel's works and 
other contemporary authors. 
Manschreck M 6:30 - 9:30 Spring 

CTS CH-565 

An Inquiry into Nihilism 

A study of origins, historical expressions, con- 
sequences, and alternatives to nihilism. 
Manschreck MW 11 -12:20 Spring 

THEOLOGY 

I. INTRODUCTORY AND 
FOUNDATIONAL 

CTS TEC -304 
Constructive Theology I 

The nature of theological thinking and 

theological method. 

LeFevre MW 3:40 - 5 p.m. Spring 

NBTS C-350 

Philosophical Ideas Which Have Shaped 

Theology : An Introduction 

This course is intended for students who have 
little or no previous philosophical background. 
Attention will be given to important ways of 
thinking philosophically which have shaped 
theology. The student will be expected to learn 
basic philosophical notions such as idealism, 
empiricism, the scientific method, tran- 
scendental idealism, existentialism, Marxism, 
and analysis. The course is understood as a 
preliminary to systematic theology. 
Piippo M7 -9:30 p.m. Spring 

NBTS C-355 

Christian Theology: Christian Life, 

Community, and God 

A continuation of C-354 exploring an- 
thropology and sanctification (the Christian life) 
in the context of ecclesiology (the Church's 
mission and life). Finally, the nature of God (as 
Person and as Trinity) is elucidated by drawing 
together the material of both courses regarding 



104 



Theological Studies 



God's revelation and historical activity. 
Prerequisite: C-354 or permission of the in- 
structor. 
Finger TTh 9:30- 10:50 Spring 

II. PARTICULAR TRADITIONS 

MTS T-322 

Christian Thought in the West from the 

Enlightenment to the Present 

This course will study ways in which Christians 
have thought about faith and the life of the 
Church from roughly 1750 to the present. 
During this time, we have both responded to 
and learned from such forces as enlightenment, 
rationalism, the critical philosophy of science, 
the romantic movement, the emergence of 
historical awareness and historical-critical 
method, Utopian and other socialisms, reductive 
humanisms, the age of colonial expansion, the 
growth of liberal optimism, the development of 
psychoanalysis, the era of world wars, the age 
of decolonialization and the dawning of an in- 
terdependent world. The aim of the course is 
neither to offer a history of these movements 
nor to detail the whole course of concurrent 
theological reflection. It is, rather, to sort out 
and clarify certain patterns in the relationship 
between Christian thought and its modern in- 
tellectual, cultural, and social environment. 
Most of the questions involved are still with us. 
This course is designed to help us understand 
the path by which we have reached our present 
theological situation, and to learn some of 
history's lessons for dealing creatively with it. 
Mudge TTh 10 - 11 :50 Spring 

NBTS C-351H 

Introduction to Theology: An Approach from 

the Underside of History 

Historico-theological analysis of different ways 
of "doing theology" in the* north Atlantic world 
with regard to methodological models, 
philosophico-theological presuppositions, im- 
plicit purposes, and their development in 
relation to historical conditions. Consideration 
of the recent emergence of third-World 
theologies and evaluation of their main charac- 
teristics as expressions of "doing theology from 
the underside of history". Examination of their 
merits and problems as well as their relevance in 
order to inspire and inform the development of 
a contextualized Hispanic American theology. 
Mottesi T 6-9 Spring 



CTS CH-367 

History and Polity in the United Church of 

Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, in- 
cluding its antecedents: the Congregational 
Christian Churches and the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church. This course earns one half 
credit and satisfies current UCC requirements 
for Ordination. 
Rooks/Bacon T2-5 Spring 

M/L TS-395 

Liberal Theology and Mythos 

Introduction to liberal theology in a double 
sense: we introduce the major theological per- 
spectives current in organized liberal religion; 
and introduce a general method by which to 
think theologically about our various un- 
derstandings of liberal faith. The major 
theological perspectives considered are Liberal 
Christianity, Empirical Theism, Religious 
Humanism, Scientific Theology, and Universal 
Religion. The method chosen defines theology as 
"reflection upon mythos or religious story." 
Engel/ Reeves TBAr Spring 

MTS T-414 

Studies in Reformed Theology 

A theological exploration of the distinctive 
character and components of Reformed 
theology. Emphasis upon an understanding of 
what "thinking within a tradition" is. Includes 
study of selected writings, including major 
figures and confessional documents. Special at- 
tention to the Confession of 1967, to determine 
whether and in what ways it is a Reformed 
document. 
Burkhart M 6 - 9 p.m. Spring 

CTS CM-523 

Seminar in Practical Theology ^Ctf/e// 

The seminar will seek to discover the im- 
plications of various approaches to theology for 
the actual praxis of ministry and religious 
leadership. Particular attention will be given to 
liberation theology, process theology, and her- 
meneutical theology. Students will be expected 
to have some knowledge of the various systems 
of theology before enrolling in the course. 
Seymour/Moore T 6:30 - 9:30 Spring 



105 



Theological Studies 



III. THEOLOGY OF PARTICULAR 
INDIVIDUALS 

MTS T-422 

Studies in the Theology of Paul Tillich 

An examination of the theological contributions 
of Paul Tillich, with special attention to the 
method of correlation as a solution to the 
problem of theology and culture. Includes in- 
troductory analysis of Tillich's theological 
development. Offers intensive scrutiny of select- 
ed portions of his Systematic Theology. 
Burkhart F 9 -11:50 Spring 

LSTC T-434 

The Theology of Martin Luther King, Jr. 

The course consists of an in-depth analysis of 
the theology and praxis of Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr., wrestling with the philosophical and 
theological principles employed by Dr. King 
and their relevance in today's theological 
market place. Each student shall be required to 
read assigned texts and participate in lectures 
and colloquy discussion; in-depth preparation 
will be required on one research paper. 
Pero T 2:30 -5 Spring 

IV. MAJOR TOPICS IN THEOLOGY 

DIT T-522 

Problems in Christology 

A biblical and Theological study of selected 
problems relating to the historical Jesus and the 
Christ of Christian faith; his consciousness, 
knowledge, psychological and ontological per- 
sonality; the meaning and relevance of 
Christological dogma. 
Minogue T Spring 

CTU T-541 

Contemporary Christologies 

A seminar study of three contemporary ap- 
proaches to christology: Pannenberg, Teilhard, 
and Process theology. Requirements for ad- 
mission: T-440 or equivalent. 
Hayes MW 1:30 -2:45 Spring 

NBTS C-456 
Salvation 

An examination of several key themes in 
soteriology — particularly those of righteousness, 
justification, and faith — in the Old and New 
Testaments. Several important theological in- 
terpretations from the past and present will be 



explored. The course is directed towards 
producing papers which develop the student's 
own biblical and theological views on these sub- 
jects and which relate them to life and ministry. 
Finger W 2:10 - 4:45 Spring 

CTU T-435 

Origins and Eschatology 

A study of the Christian symbols concerning the 
origins of human life, the world and evil; a 
correlative investigation of finality and 
eschatological symbolism. 
Hayes MW 10 -.30 - 11 ■ 45 Spring 

CTU T-436 

Origins and Ends in Mythic Consciousness 

A comparison of central themes in Christian 
eschatology — apocalyptic crisis literature, 
death, final completion of the individual and the 
world — with eschatological views in selected 
non-Christian religious literature. The com- 
parison will be directed toward a better un- 
derstanding of eschatological symbols and sym- 
bolic systems in both Christian and other 
cultural situations. 
Schreiter TTh 10:30 - 11 -.45 Spring 

LSTC T-543 

The Kingdom of God and Life Everlasting 

This seminar will focus on the religious symbols 
and doctrines gathered together in the area of 
Christian eschatology. There will be initial lec- 
tures by the instructor, followed by research 
papers presented by members of the class. Par- 
ticular attention will be given to the theologies 
of Paul Tillich and Wolfhart Pannenberg. 
Braaten MW 2:30 -3:45 Spring 

DIT T-590 
Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects are offered under 
this rubric. Consult professor for topic in which 
you are interested. Offered in response to 
student interest. 
Staff TBAr Upon Request 

V. CHRISTIANITY AND 
THE WORLD 

M/L TS-361 
Women and Religion : 
Theological Reflection 

This course will focus attention upon women 
and feminine motifs as discovered in early 



106 



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Theological Studies 



Christian literature. Particular consideration 
will be given to non-biblical texts, e.g. The 
Apocryphal Acts and The Nag Hammadi 
Documents. There will be readings from 
modern writers who see the Christian faith from 
a feminist perspective. An attempt will be made 
to evaluate the writings in terms of ministry to 
both sexes. 
Arthur Th 7 -9:30 p.m. Spring 

LSTC T-545 

Ministerial Identity and Apostolic Continuity 

Research and group work on the contemporary 
problem of ministerial identity, the meaning of 
ordination, the relation of "Ministry of Word 
and Sacrament" and "Historic Episcopacy" to 
apostolic continuity. Studies in Lutheran 
bilateral efforts with Roman Catholic, Or- 
thodox and Reformed Churches toward a com- 
mon ministry. Prerequisite: LSTC T-310 or 
equivalent. 
Tobias TTh 8:30-9:45 Spring 

VI. SPIRITUALITY AND 
SPIRITUAL DIRECTION 

CTU M-412 

Theology and Practice of Prayer 

A course exploring the history and spirituality 
of forms of prayer. After an initial study of 
prayer in the New Testament, the course will 
systematically explore the different forms of 
Christian prayer (liturgical, private, ways of 
meditation, devotions in popular piety), con- 
sidering their historical development and their 
place in Christian spirituality. 
Lozano TTh 12 - 1:15 Spring 

CTU T-496 

East- West Spiritualities: 

From Challenge to Integration 

This course is an in-depth study of the main 
sources of eastern spiritualities (Hindu, Con- 
fucian, Taoist, Buddhist, Shinto, Maoist). Their 
inner relationship to new currents of Christian 
spirituality is explored, not only from a critical 
but also from a pastoral and liturgical point of 
view. 

Spae M 3 - 5:30 p.m. Spring 

4/12 - 5/12 

DIT M-580 
Spiritual Direction 

A study of the purpose and object of spiritual 



direction; varying models of spirituality; 
discerning the patterns of spirituality in self and 
others; methods of spiritual direction. 
VanLinden TBAr Spring 

ETHICAL STUDIES 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

CTS TEC-321 
Christian Ethics 

Historical and contemporary Christian ethical 
systems with a consideration of their im- 
plications and current significance. 
Schroeder MW 2 - 3:20 p.m. Spring 

BTS E r 351 

Christian Faith and Ethics 

An introduction to the main themes that shape 
contemporary theological thinking. Major 
nineteenth-century theologians will be con- 
sidered with regard to such questions as the 
basis of religious experience; the problems of 
faith and history; the relationship of faith and 
ethics; and the kind of understanding ap- 
propriate to faith. 
Groff/ Miller WF 2:10 -3:30 Spring 

II. THE BIBLE, THE CHURCH 
AND ETHICS 

LSTC B-450 

Studies in New Testament Ethics G^Cef/ed 

A study of selected ethical concerns found in the 
New Testament, such as wealth, poverty, the 
state, work, marriage and divorce, the Christian 
family, the relation of male and female 
homosexuality, peace, law, violence, justice. 
Students will have an opportunity to work in 
areas of their special interest. 
Norquist TF 1 -2:15 Spring 

BTS B-455 
Biblical Ethics 

This course looks to biblical narrative for 
values, contents, and norms which allow per- 
sons made "in the image of God" to in- 
tentionally fashion their understandings, 
judgments, and responses as covenant com- 
munity, so as to correspond to God's creation 
and promise. This course presupposes some 
acquaintance with such human development 
materials as those which can be gained either in 
The Development of Conscience or The 



107 



Ethical Studies 



Covenant in Biblical Tradition. 

Meyer TTh 9:30-10:50 Spring 

NBTS B-530 

Sermon on the Mount 

A seminar study involving an understanding of 
the kingdom of God and the ethical teachings of 
Jesus. Research projects and student interchange 
will be emphasized. 
Guelich/ Snyder TTh 11 -12:15 Spring 

CTU E-379 

Christian Ethics: The Moral Agent 
An introductory study of the place of an agent- 
centered morality and of the notion of virtue 
within Christian ethics. Major areas of con- 
centration include Thomas Aquinas and the 
contemporary virtue approach of Hauerwas. 
This approach will then be contrasted with 
other contemporary methods in order to ascer- 
tain its significance for moral decision making. 
Nairn MW3-4:15 Fall 

Nairn MW 12 -1:15 Spring 

III. MORAL THEOLOGY 

DIT E-341 

Principles of Christian Morality 

The course will focus on the principles and 
processes involved in Christian decision 
making. It will consider the formation of con- 
science from the viewpoint of a faculty 
psychology, from a developmental viewpoint, 
and from the viewpoint of Lonergan's in- 
tentional analysis. Human freedom and respon- 
sibility will be considered in their psychological 
and theological dimensions. The basics of 
natural law and the possibility of a formal 
existential ethic will be treated. 
Minogue M WF 8:10-9 Sp ring 

CTU E-536 

Ambiguity in Moral Decision Making 

A critical assessment of R. McCormick's essay, 
'Ambiguity in Moral Choice," in relationship to 
the tradition which preceded it and to the con- 
tinuing debate which has followed it. Among 
areas which will be covered are the notion of 
ethical borderline situations, the development of 
double-effect methodology, "ontic evil," and the 
"direct-indirect" distinction in ethics. 
Nairn TTh 1:30-2:45 Spring 



DIT E-545 

Freedom and Responsibility 

This seminar seeks to explore the reality of 
human freedom from a personal, theological, 
and communal dimension. The implications and 
structures of responsibility in a classic and 
modern horizon will be examined. 
Minogue T Spring 

IV. SOCIAL AND 
POLITICAL ETHICS 

CTU E-374 

On Being A Christian in the World 

The course will focus on the development, in 
the last hundred years, of a new presence and 
relevancy of the Church in public life and on 
how this development is related to a new un- 
derstanding of the Church's mission and of its 
claim to be "the universal sacrament of 
salvation." Attention will be given to foun- 
dational texts in the Roman Catholic tradition 
and the main texts of other Christian traditions 
with the aim of discovering the ability of the 
Christian community to influence social ethics 
and public policy. 
Fornasari MW 9 - 10:15 Spring 

M/L E-392 
Environmental Ethics 

A comparative study of the principal con- 
temporary proposals for an "ecological ethic," 
and the various modes of ethical theory which 
they exemplify. Representatives of theology, 
philosophy, literature, the natural sciences, and 
public life will be examined. An attempt will be 
made to place these proposals in social context, 
and to test their relative adequacy, by tracing 
their practical implications for a selected en- 
vironmental issue. 
Engel TBAr Spring 

MTS E-416 

Peace as a Christian Moral Concern 

This course examines some of the various ways 
Christians have defined peace and the im- 
plications this has had for acting toward its 
realization. Possible issues to examine are the 
arms race, political involvement in social 
change and food distribution. 
Garcia T 7 - 9:50 p.m. Spring 

(CENTER) 



108 



World Mission Studies 

DIT E-443 
Social Justice 

The course will consider the social mission of 
the Church in the world. It will set the modern 
horizon via an analysis of the Enlightenment, 
Marxism, capitalism, and secularism. Develop- 
ment of papal social teaching will be examined. 
Political theology, Liberation theology, and 
Theology of the Cross will be used to focus the 
question of the Church's social mission. 
Minogue MWF 10:10 -11 Spring 

CTU E-409 

Ethical Issues in the War/Peace Debate 

The course will examine traditional Christian 
perspectives on War/Peace questions such as 
the Crusades, the Just War and Pacifism. Con- 
temporary issues such as the arms race, military 
spending and methods for peaceful resolution of 
conflict will also be considered. 
Pawlikowski TTh 1:30-2: 45 Spring 



V. SEXUALITY 

CTU E-580 

Theology and Ethics of Christian Marriage 

This course begins with the development of a 
Christian anthropology of human love, 
followed by a consideration of some traditional 
church teaching on the theology of marriage in- 
volving such issues as fidelity, indissolubility, 
contract/covenant, etc. Some contemporary 
concerns will then be treated: marriage 
preparation, on-going support for the family 
unity, separation and divorce, responsible 
parenthood, sterilization, etc. Students will be 
expected to arrive at an appropriate pastoral 
response. 
Diesbourg MW 10:30 - 11:45 Spring 



VI. SELECTED TOPICS IN ETHICS 

DIT E-590 

Directed Reading on Selected Topics 

Tutorials in various subjects are offered under 
this rubric. Consult professor for topic in which 
you are interested. Offered in response to 
student interest. 
Minogue TBAr Upon Request 



Ethical Studies 

WORLD MISSION STUDIES 

I. THEOLOGY, FOUNDATIONS, 

AND DYNAMICS OF MISSION 

CTU T-446 

The Missionary Dynamics of the Church 

In the light of the contemporary questioning of 
"the missions" this course will try to determine 
why the Church by her very nature must be 
missionary, what this mission means, how 
"necessary" it is in the plan of salvation, and 
how it is to be carried out in our modern, post- 
colonial world. 
TBAr TTh 9 -10:15 Spring 

CTU W-446 

Initiatory Rites and Christian Initiation 

This seminar will include a review of initiatory 
rites in traditional societies: their nature, func- 
tion, and significance. Special consideration will 
be given to Jung's theory of the collective un- 
conscious and the realization of self, and to the 
ritual of death and rebirth found in both 
traditional initiatory rites and Christian 
initiation. African and Native American Church- 
es which have used the concept and practice 
of traditional rites in the teaching and liturgical 
expression of Christian rites will be used as case 
studies. 
Barbour M 7 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTU W-538 

Basic Christian Communities, Justice 

and Global Solidarity 

This seminar will study the emergence of Basic 
Christian Communities in the U.S. Through 
case studies and visits to local communities their 
raison d'etre and methodologies will be 
examined and compared with similar realities in 
Latin America and Africa. The major Christian 
Community for the larger church and their 
relationship to the questions of global 
solidarity and justice. 
Barbour W 7 -9:30 p.m. Spring 

II. MISSION IN PARTICULAR 
SITUATIONS 

LSTC W-428 
Understanding Islam 

The existence of two million Muslims in the 
USA, and the dramatic emergence of Islam on 
the world scene, have awakened increased in- 



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Ministry Studies 



terest in the nature of Islam, and underscored 
the need for deeper understanding, mutual 
respect, greater contact and dialogue within the 
context of religious pluralism. The course in- 
troduces the student to the origins of Islam, the 
Qur'an and its teachings, the life of the prophet, 
Muslim worship and practice and characteristics 
of Muslim life in the modern world. Christian 
faith and witness are considered in the light of 
Muslim goals and values. Occasional attendance 
at Friday prayers and some field work are 
required. 
Scherer MW 2:30 -3:45 Spring 

MTS W-454 

The Church and Economic Issues 

The course will be divided into two parts. The 
first half would deal with the bases of the 
church's relation to economic issues in the early 
Twentieth century and its development through 
the Depression, into the Post-World War II 
period and into the current world economic 
crisis. The second half will deal with a number 
of current examples of the church's involvement 
with situations which provide insights into 
theology and praxis in ministry (e.g. neigh- 
borhood disinvestment; energy and the church- 
es; undocumented workers and immigration; 
church/labor relations; unemployment and the 
local congregation; plant closings and com- 
munity well-being). 
Poethig T 2-4:50 Spring 

III. SPECIAL TOPICS IN MISSION 

CTU B-490 

Biblical Foundations of Mission 

The attitude of the Bible towards the outside 
world will be investigated for direction in the 
world mission of the Church today. In the Old 
Testament special attention will be devoted to 
the cultural and moral interdependency of Israel 
with the nations as well as to such motifs as 
election, universal salvation and monotheism. 
New Testament study will focus on the mission 
of Jesus and its interpretation in the theologies 
of select Gospels, Pauline Letters and other New 
Testament writings. 
Bergant/ Senior MW 9 - 10:15 Spring 



CTU W-545 

Cultural Anthropology 

Introduction to essential concepts of cultural an- 
thropology with application to missionary 
work. A reading course by arrangement with 
staff. 
Staff TBAr Spring 

MINISTRY: ITS 
NATURE AND PRACTICE 

I. THE NATURE OF MINISTRY 

NBTS M-360 
Church and Society 

Consideration of the basic theological presup- 
positions about the relation-tension Christian - 
world, Church-society. Analysis of the U.S. 
socio-economico-politico-cultural situation as a 
reality in conflict "ad intra" and "ad extra", in 
search of a historico-con textual localization. A 
contempoary reading from the Bible from that 
situation, in search of generating paradigms of a 
contextualized intelligence about the life and 
mission of the Church. Emphasis on the 
development of the students' projects on 
missiological orientations for a pastoral or- 
thopraxis looking at specific cases, for later ex- 
position and discussion in class. Prerequisite: 
Introduction to Theology or equivalent. 
Mottesi M 1:10 -3:40 Spring 

MTS M-400 

Religion and the Social Sciences 

A critical examination of the work of classical 
and contemporary social scientiests with the 
purpose of arriving at their understanding of the 
nature and function of religion. Attention will 
be given to some of the works of Weber, 
Durkheim, Marx, Freud, Berger and Geertz. 
Garcia F 9 -11:50 Spring 

CTS CM-523 

Seminar in Practical Theology ^Hce/fetf 

The seminar will seek to discover the im- 
plications of various approaches to theology for 
the actual praxis of ministry and religious 
leadership. Particular attention will be given to 
liberation theology, process theology, and her- 
meneutical theology. Students will be expected 
to have some knowledge of the various systems 
of theology before enrolling in the course. 
Seymour/Moore T 6:30 -9:30 Spring 



110 



Ministry Studies 



NBTS M-570 

Readings in the Theology and Practice of 

Ministry 

This seminar will focus on classic texts from 
biblical, historical and contemporary per- 
spectives. Readings and student reports will 
range widely from biblical word studies to the 
examination of the theological rationale for 
ministry behaviour as modeled in contemplative 
or activistic styles viewed historically. Themes 
such as women or laity in Christian history and 
theology may be explored by student choice. 
Recent works such as Theological Foundations 
for Ministry and Ministry in America will be 
examined as well. Students should view this 
course as integrative for biblical, theological 
and ministry studies. Some competence in all 
three areas is assumed upon registration. 
Bakke Th7-9:30 Spring 

DIT M-580 
Spiritual Direction 

A study of the purpose and object of spiritual 
direction; varying models of spirituality; 
discerning the patterns of spirituality in self and 
others; methods of spiritual direction. 
VanLinden TBAr Spring 

II. MINISTRY, CHURCH 
AND SOCIETY 

MTS M-301 

The Contexts of Ministry 

(One unit of credit for all three quarters: see 

course description, Fall, Ministry, Church and 

Society). 

Armendariz & Others F 2- 3:30 Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

LSTC M-370 

Ministry in Church and Society 

(Teaching Parish) 

The classroom part of the course will aim at un- 
derstanding of contemporary social in- 
terpretation, at clarity on how one moves from 
faith to love to justice, and at a critical per- 
spective on how the church is affected and is af- 
fecting the social order. The parish involvement 
dimension of the course requires the student to 
participate in a local parish effort at community 
responsibility. 
Benne TTh 11 -12:15 Spring 



LSTC M-415 

Ministry in Hispanic Communities 

This course will address the study of the unique 
characteristics of ministry among Hispanic- 
Americans who live in the U.S. The areas to be 
covered are: worship; homiletics, education, 
counseling, and evangelization in a wholistic 
perspective. The experiential component of this 
course will reflect Hispanic ministry settings on 
an ecumenical basis. The course will be offered 
primarily in the Spanish language, but is also 
open to English speaking students. 
Navarro MW 2:30 -3:45 Spring 

LSTC M-415 

Ministerio en Comunidades Hispanicas 

Este curso estudiara las caracteristicas peculiares 
del ministerio entre hispanoamericanos que 
residen en los Estados Unidos de Norteamerica. 
Las areas de estudio son: liturgia, homiletica, 
educacion, consejeria, y evangelizacion desde 
una perspectiva integral. La metodologia que 
sera usada consistira de conferencias, discusion 
en grupos, entrevistas y seminarios de refleccion 
sobre lo aprendido en cuanto a la religiosidad 
popular que prevalece entre los 
hispanoamericanos, y presentaciones por 
paneles compuestos de lideres laicos y clero 
cristiano de entre las iglesias y organizaciones 
comunitarias. Los participantes haran com- 
paraciones entre ministerios monolingues y 
bilingues, para identificar similitudes y diferen- 
cias a fin de culminar en conclusiones 
especificas, que puedan ser presentadas en for- 
ma de recomendaciones concretas para una 
misiologia mas apropiada entre 

hispanoamericanos residentes en los Estados 
Unidos de Norteamerica. El componente viven- 
cial usara situaciones ministeriales sobre una 
base ecumenica. El curso se ofrecera primor- 
dialmente en espanol, pero tambien esta abierto 
a estudiantes monolingues que hablen solo 
ingles. 
Navarro MW 2:30 -3:45 Spring 

NBTS C-459H 

Sociology of Religion 

in the Hispanic Community 

The course will provide background familiarity 
with structure and process of urban Hispanic 
religious life from the viewpoint of the 
sociology of religion. We will compare and con- 
trast how the Catholic Church responded to 
white ethnic European immigrants at the turn of 



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Pastoral Care 



the century with current Catholic strategies 
regarding Cuban, Puerto Rican and Mexican 
newcomers to U.S. cities since the 1940's. A 
special focus will be to examine the Pentecostal 
and other believer's church movement in its 
social impact on Puerto Ricans and 
Mexican/Chicanos. The issue of the historical 
mainline Protestant denomination and the 
Hispanic will also be evaluated. Traditional 
sociological themes such as class diversity, race 
and ethnicity, sexism and urbanism will be 
utilized to measure how social and religious 
issues find communal expression among urban 
Latinos. 
TBA Th6-9p.m. Spring 

NBTS M-462 

Contemporary Urban Strategies: 

A Seminar in the City 

Designed as a traveling seminar in urban 
mission, this class will meet in a different 
Chicago community each week to confront a 
wide range of contextual dynamics and an equal 
range of ministry responses. Students should ex- 
pect to stay in the city two or three nights to ex- 
perience urban families, churches and the city it- 
self in personal ways. Readings, interviews, a 
reflective journal and group participation is ex- 
pected. A course project will give participants 
opportunity to explore one issue in urban ec- 
clesiology in some depth. M-362 or its 
equivalent is a prerequisite for entrance to this 
seminar. 
Bakke Ml -.10 -3:30 Spring 

CTU M-496 

Approved Summer Ministries 

This course is a summer ministry experience in 
varied established settings, such as urban 
ministry agencies, rural ministry sites, and 
political process ministry groups. This ministry 
experience is composed of an appropriate 
preparation, a placement in an approved 
ministry setting, and an integrative debriefing. 
By arrangement with the M.Div. Director. 
Szura/ Staff TBAr Spring 

NBTS M-377 

The Theology and Practice of Evangelism 

A study of the biblical message of the Gospel, 
its personal communication in contemporary 
society, and an introduction to and assessment 
of evangelization strategies in local churches, 
denominational programs and para-church 



agencies. This course will satisfy the basic 

evangelism requirement. 

Bakke TTh 11 -12:15 Spring 



III. CHURCH ORGANIZATION, 
ADMINISTRATION AND GROWTH 

CTU M-425 

Church Stewardship (2) 

An overview of business and church 
management for persons entering parish and 
other forms of ministry. The course is aimed at 
developing basic skills in accounting and 
business administration. Specifically, it will deal 
with basic bookkeeping, budgeting, personnel 
management, banking procedures, cash system 
controls, payroll and tax management, property 
and insurance, purchasing and investment. 
Along with the necessary skills, there will be a 
consideration of the kinds of attitudes which 
should be part of the stewardship of church 
resources. 
Hill W 7 -9 p.m. Spring 

CTS CH-367 

History and Polity of the 

United Church of Christ 

A study of the history, structure, theology and 
practices of the United Church of Christ, in- 
cluding its antecedents: the Congregational 
Christian Churches and the Evangelical and 
Reformed Church. This course earns one half 
credit and satisfies current UCC requirements 
for Ordination. 
Rooks/Bacon T 2 - 5 Spring 

PASTORAL CARE 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

LSTC M-320A, B 

Ministry in Pastoral Care (Teaching Parish) 

A foundational course in pastoral ministry con- 
sisting of correlation of historical and 
theological perspective for pastoral care, as well 
as contemporary situation-oriented workshops. 
Students are assigned to groups of selected 
parishes for supervised field work. Regular con- 
sultation between classroom and field staff as 
well as periodic inclusion of field work staff in 
classroom workshops provide for an integrated 
approach. 
Anderson/ Swanson TTh 8:30 -9:45 Spring 



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Pastoral Care 



CTS CM-330 

Personal Transformation 

The basic course dealing with the nature and 
dynamics of personal transformation ap- 
proached both experientially and theoretically. 
The context and uniqueness of pastoral care and 
the nature of the caring church community will 
be explored. 
Moore MW 2 - 3:20 p.m. Spring 

CTU M-497 

Pastoral Internship (6) 

A two-quarter pastoral internship for priests, 
deacons, and non-ordained ministers under the 
guidance of qualified supervisors. The in- 
ternship begins with a workshop in which the 
interns and supervisors together plan and con- 
tract for the goals, tasks and methods of 
evaluation of the intern experience. By 
arrangement with the M.Div. Director. 
Szura TBAr Spring 



humanistic psychology is followed by the iden- 
tification and exploration of their theological 
implications. Special attention will be paid to 
the topic of humanistic fulfillment in relation to 
spiritual growth. 
Szura MW 1:30 -2:45 Spring 

CTU M-405 

Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

(For course description see Fall, Pastoral Coun- 
seling) . 

Mallonee TTh9-10:15 Fall 

Mallonee MW 9 -10:15 Winter 

Mallonee MW 9 -10:15 Spring 

CTU M-406 

Practicum in Basic Types of Pastoral Counseling 

(See course description Fall, Pastoral Coun- 
seling). 

Mallonee MW 9 -10:15 Fall 

Mallonee TTh9-10:15 Spring 



II. PASTORAL COUNSELING 

BTS M-380 

Faith Community as Healer 

This course is an introduction to the basic skills 
of pastoral care: listening empathetically, 
evaluating and diagnosing human problems, 
developing strategies for change, organizing the 
faith community for pastoral care, using the 
resources of the mental health profession, 
theologizing within the life experiences of per- 
sons. Students will be trained through exercises, 
role-playing, video-tapes, reading and class 
discussion to understand human problems and 
to theologize on the meaning of healing in the 
faith community. 
Poling TThll- 12:20 Spring 

NBTS M-394 

Theories of Personality and Counseling 

A study of major theories of personality along 
with a religious and psychological interpretation 
related to the Christian understanding of man. 
A knowledge of personality is of immense im- 
portance in counseling. The course will em- 
phasize those aspects of personality that deter- 
mine and affect a person's behaviour. 
Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Counseling. 
Taylor WF 2:10 -3:30 Spring 

CTU M-403 

Theological Topics in Humanistic Psychology 

A survey of the origins and major exponents of 



NBTS M-499 
Theories of Counseling 

A study of various theories of counseling in or- 
der that students will be acquainted with dif- 
ferent perspectives of counseling. Theories that 
have proven to be more helpful will be 
highlighted. Each term the major emphasis will 
be on a specific theory. Attempts will be made 
to invite therapists of different modalities to 
participate in the course. Prerequisite: Fun- 
damentals of Counseling. 
Taylor WF 8 - 9:20 a.m. Spring 

CTU M-510 

Psychology for Theology and Ministry 

(For course description see Fall, Pastoral Coun- 
seling). 

Szura TBAr Fall 

Szura TBAr Winter 

Szura TBAr Spring 

III. SELECTED TOPICS IN 
PASTORAL CARE 

CTS CM-467 

Adlerian Psychotherapy and Pastoral 

Counseling 

An exploration of contemporary Adlerian 
psychotherapeutic theory and technique as a 
resource for pastoral care and counseling. 
Moore Th 9 -.30- 12:20 Spring 



113 



Pastoral Care 



CCTS M-535 
Psychology of Religion 



A study of psychology's attempt to give 
systematic description and clinical analysis to a 
person's religious experience and behavior. Con- 
sideration will be given to the perspectives and 
contributions of leaders in the field, including 
James, Leuba, Pratt, Boisen, Clark, Allport, 
Pruyser, as well as the positions of Freud and 
Jung. (Alternates yearly with CCTS M-593 
Stress and Crisis Intervention). 
Sioanson F 9 - Noon Spring 

BTS M-582 

Pastoral Care as Theology 

The course will explore a model of pastoral care 
which draws on the insights of process theology 
(Daniel Day Williams and others) and on social 
interaction theory (George Herbert Mead). The 
practice of pastoral care will draw on the in- 
sights of family therapy and move toward a 
theological model which views God as an in- 
teractant in human experience. The results will 
be a theology of pastoral care which un- 
derstands persons within their relational context 
(relation to self, others, world, and God) and 
which helps persons to solve problems of living 
and to experience more deeply the richness of 
life in Christ. 
Poling WF 10:50 -12:10 Spring 

DIT M-556, 557, 558 
Pastoral Care of the Aged 

The course involves training in geriatric care. 
The program seeks to minister to the social and 
religious needs of the aged. 
Ulrich TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

DIT M-560, 561, 562 
Pastoral Care of the Family 

The course involves a series of training sessions 
in family counseling, and on-sight involvement 
with troubled families. The counselors work in 
mixed pairs so as to facilitate group interaction. 
Staff TBAr Fall/ Winter/ Spring 

LITURGY AND WORSHIP 
I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS M-314 

Understanding The Dynamics of Corporate 

Worship 

We begin by studying the nature of authentic, 
corporate Christian worship, from theological, 
historical and pastoral perspectives. In light of 



Liturgy and Worship 

that understanding we then explore what gives 
integrity to the Sacraments, orders of worship, 
public prayers, weddings, funerals, music in 
worship, children in the sanctuary and the ob- 
servance of the Christian year. 
Wardlaw MW 10 -11 -.50 Spring 

CTU T-350 

Basic Principles of Catholic Worship 

(For course description see Fall, Liturgy and 

Worship). 

Ostdiek MW 1:30 -2:45 p.m. Fall 

Hughes Sec. A: MW 9 - 10:15 a.m. Spring 

Keifer Sec. B: MW 1;30 - 2:45 p.m. Spring 

NBTS M-388 
Worship in the Church 

This course is concerned with various aspects of 
worship in the church, from the theology of 
worship to the effective conduct of services. 
Consideration is given to contemporary patterns 
of worship. Special attention is given to baptism 
and the Lord's Supper and to weddings and 
funerals. 
Goddard T 2:30 - 5 Spring 



II. LITURGICAL LEADERSHIP 

DIT M-431 

Practicum in Presidential Style of 

Celebration I 

This course attempts to prepare candidates to 
understand and celebrate the liturgical rituals of 
the Catholic Church, focusing on the deacon's 
role in the Eucharist, baptism, funerals, wed- 
dings, Communion services. Actual practice and 
videotaping are included. 
Arceneaux WF 10:10 - 11 Spring 

DIT M-432 

Practicum in Presidential Style of Celebration II 

This course attempts to prepare candidates to 
understand and celebrate the liturgical rituals of 
the Catholic Church, focusing on the priest's 
role in the Eucharist, Reconciliation, Anointing 
of the Sick, funerals and weddings. Actual prac- 
tice and video-taping are included. 
VanLinden/ Arceneaux WF 9:10 - 10 Spring 

MTS M-444 

Worship and Liturgy in the Hispanic 

Congregation 

The course will examine traditional and non- 
traditional worship and liturgical materials in 



114 



Liturgy and Worship 



the Hispanic congregation. In doing so, the 
process will be to explore those resources in or- 
der to develop authentic expressions of liturgy 
in relation to cultural context. 
Armenddriz W 7 - 9:50 p.m. Spring 

CTU 1-490 
Bible and Liturgy 

An investigation of the use of the scriptures in 
the Sunday liturgies of the major seasons of the 
liturgical year. The seminar will focus on the 
difference between each text's interpretation in 
the biblical context and in the liturgical context. 
Its purpose will be to draw out the presup- 
positions for an effective and liturgically ap- 
propriate homily. Accountably: assigned 
readings, discussions and a paper. 
La Verdiere TTh 10:30-11:45 Spring 



and on the theological bases for the various 
models of priesthood in Roman Catholicism. 
Particular attention will be given to how history 
and theology affect conceptions of priestly iden- 
tity and role in the church today. 
Linnan MW 12 - 1:15 Spring 

DIT M-465 

Orders : Mission and Ministry 

This is a study of the development of Orders as 
a sacrament of ministry in the Church. It 
focuses on the meaning and purpose of this 
sacrament in the context of the mission and 
ministry of the Catholic Church, drawing 
especially from developments of Vatican II and 
recent approaches to ministry in the modern 
world. 
Arceneaux WF 9:10 - 10 Spring 



III. SACRAMENTS 

DIT M-361 

Sacraments of Initiation : 

Baptism, Confirmation 

This is the study of the basic principles of 
sacramental theology in a Christological, ec- 
clesiological, anthropological and liturgical 
framework; it considers the institution, nature, 
number and causality of sacraments. Baptism 
and Confirmation are studied as a sacramental 
liturgical rites of initiation into the Church. 
Arceneaux MWF 9:10 -10 Spring 

DIT M-463 

Sacraments of Healing : 
Penance & Anointing of the Sick 

This is a study of two sacraments as sacraments 
of reconciliation and healing, beginning with 
their Biblical roots and focusing on their 
meaning and purpose as they developed in the 
history of the Church, particularly through the 
official teaching and liturgical practice of the 
Church. 
Staff TTh 9:10 -10 Spring 

CTU 1-444 

Priesthood in the Roman Catholic Tradition 

This course will concentrate on the origin, 
history and developing nature of the priesthood 



IV. HISTORY OF LITURGY 



V. PRAYER 



VI. MUSIC 



VII. SELECTED TOPICS 

BTS M-475 

The Facilitation of Worship 

A study of worship and music as expressed in 
the Free Church tradition. The theology and 
structure of worship will be analyzed, but each 
person will be encouraged to become aware of 
his or her own expressive gifts and thus use 
them in the planning and leading of corporate 
worship in such a way as to be authentic to 
one's self and to the congregation. 
Fans W 2:10 -4:55 Spring 

CTU T-550 

Area Studies in Worship : 

Great Books in Liturgy 

(For course description see Fall, Liturgy and 

Worship). 

Staff TBAr Fall 

Staff TBAr Spring 

Staff TBAr Winter 




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Liturgy and Worship 



Preaching and Communication 



CTU M-562 

Liturgy of the Synagogue : Advanced Seminar 

An in-depth study of the synagogue liturgy of 
the High Holy Days and Pilgrim Festivals. 
Selection of texts according to the background 
and needs of the students. 
Perelmuter TTh9-10:15 Spring 

DIT M-590 
Directed Research 

(For course description see Fall, Liturgy and 

Worship). 

Arceneaux TBA Upon Request 

PREACHING AND 
COMMUNICATION 

I. FOUNDATIONAL COURSES 

DIT M-303 

Introduction to the Homily 

The goal of this course is to learn the nature of 
the homily; its place in liturgy. Place an em- 
phasis on the homily as an entity but integral to 
total liturgy. Take a look at homily models; 
adapting sermon composition-model to homily. 
Staff Th 10:10 -11 Spring 

DIT M-404 

Practicum and Homily Critics 

The goal of this course is to deepen the ex- 
perience of preaching by giving emphasis to a 
variety of situations. We will continue to em- 
phasize use of voice, body, style of delivery, 
and effective communication skills. 
Staff W 10:10 -11 Spring 

CTU M-450A, B 

Preaching as Verbal Communication 

(See course description Fall, Preaching and 

Communication). 

Hughes A, B Seminar M 12 - 1 Fall 

ALabM3-5 Winter 

B Lab W 12 -2 Spring 

II. AREA STUDIES IN PREACHING 

DIT M-301 

The Minister as Communicator 

The goal of this course is to learn models of 
communication. Hear about and discuss com- 
munication processes; interpersonal; group; 
A/V, various means of mediating messages. An 
evaluation of personal communication strengths 



and weaknesses. Aids to improving weaknesses. 
And to get acquainted with some of the actual 
special communication situations the minister 
finds himself in. 
Staff Th 9:10 -10 Spring 

MTS M-401 

The Power of Language in the Community 

of Faith 

Language arises out of community to order the 
chaos, to enable dialogue, to create un- 
derstanding, to present and re-present a world 
of belief. Such language has a form (gospel, 
history, poetry, play, letter, myth, narrative, 
fable, proposition, law), an origin (tradition, 
culture, media, lived experience) and a purpose 
(to enslave, to liberate, to engage, to distance). 
This course will consider the nature of language 
and communication within the community of 
faith and will wrestle with questions such as: 
How is reality ordered, meaning created, belief 
transmitted through various forms of language 
and how does such language shape the com- 
munity that claims this language as its own? 
What is the coincidence of form and content 
that has the power to engage the imagination of 
a people, to inform that imagination biblically 
and theologically and to equip that community 
to proclaim and incarnate the content of that 
vision? Format will include reading, discussion, 
and weekly written response to the readings. 
Jarvis MW 10 -11: 50 Spring 

MTS M-417 

Learning to Preach in Community 

(For description see Fall Quarter) Half-credit per 

Quarter. 

Wardlaw TBA Spring 

LSTC M-459 

Preaching on Social Issues 

This course will probe the limits and 
possibilities of preaching on social issues 
ranging from questions of war and peace to 
questions of local community responsibility, but 
with particular attention given to economic life. 
Students will be requested to give sermons on 
self-selected topics. Prerequisite: at least one 
course in preaching. 
Benne, Niedenthal MW 11 -12:15 Spring 



CCTS M-473 

The Church's Electronic Ministry 



A critical analysis of popular culture as 
delivered by the mass media of communication, 



116 



Educational Ministry 



Preaching and Communication 



inlcuding probes of how the media revolution 
affects perception, value formation, human un- 
derstanding and community. An experiential ex- 
ploration of how the media serves as ministers 
of transcendence in congregational education 
and community mission. Approaches include 
"hands on" experience of media and utilization 
of Chicago area media agencies and resources. 
Kennel T 7 - 10 p.m. Spring 

EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
OF THE CHURCH 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

II. ADMINISTRATION 
AND METHODS " 

NBTS M-382 

Organization and Administration of 

Christian Education 

A study of management theory and its ap- 
plication to church organization and 
educational ministry. The course includes ob- 
servation and evaluation of church educational 
programs. 
Jenkins TTh 8 - 9:20 Spring 



dynamic enterprise responding to a constantly 
changing world. This course will explore 
religious education as a major responsibility of 
most parish ministers, seeking to ground it in 
solid theory and seasoned practice. 
Staff TBAr Spring 

NBTS M-482 

Ministry to the Growing Child 

Survey of the developmental nature of children 
between the age of 6-11 in order to evaluate the 
church's educational ministry to children and to 
develop skills and methods most effective in 
building a Christian environment in the home, 
church or community. 
Morris TBAr Spring 

DIT M-584 

Practicum in Catechesis to High School Students 

(See course description, Fall, Educational 

Ministry and the Life Cycle). 

Staff TBAr Every Quarter 

DIT M-585 

Practicum in Catechesis to Special Education 

Students 

(See course description Fall, Educational 

Ministry and the Life Cycle). 

Staff TBAr Every Quarter 



MTS M-410 

Resources for Church Education 

Comparative studies of materials for use in the 

development of teaching in the church. 

Pries ter MW 4- 5:50 Spring 

LSTC M-467 
Multi-Media Education 

An examination of the tools of multi-media and 
possibilities for their use in parish program- 
ming. The students will be engaged in the use of 
video and audio cassettes, television, movies, 
slides, etc., to explore the potential in 
congregational and interdenominational use. 
Resource persons and field trips will be used. 
Bozeman T 2:30 -5 Spring 

III. EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 
AND THE LIFE CYCLE 

M/L M-305 

Unitarian Universalist Ministry Seminar : 

Religious Education 

Religous education is and must be a creative, 



IV. PERSPECTIVES ON 
EDUCATIONAL MINISTRY 

NBTS M-581 

Research Seminar in Christian Education 

Advanced students may design an independent 
course study. The seminar will convene during 
the winter quarter to design research projects 
and to initiate preparation for the special field 
examination. During the spring quarter the 
seminar will meet to discuss research and 
project reports. 
Jenkins M 1:10 - 3:40 Spring 

CANON LAW 

DIT M-420 

Selected Areas in the Ordering of the 

Church's Mission 

Treated are legal residence and its effects; 
current policy regarding Christian burial; legal 
aspects of ecumenical relationships, especially 
with regard to the sacraments; general norms 
for administration of Church property; general 




117 



Supervised Ministry 



principles of penal law, with certain specific ap- 
plications; and due process. 
Parres MWF9:10-10 Spring 

DIT M-520 

Matrimonial Jurisprudence 

A study of the procedural law on matrimony 
and the current jurisprudence of diocesan 
tribunals in the United States, as well as that of 
the Rota, in selected areas. Offered in response 
to student interest. 
Bogdan TBAr Spring 

SUPERVISED MINISTRY 

I. INTRODUCTORY 

MTS M-304, 305, 306 
The Practice of Ministry 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Jarvis TBA Fall 304 

Winter 305 
Spring 306 

DIT M-341, 342 

Pastoral Care of the Disadvantaged 

(For course description see Winter, Supervised 
Ministry). 

Ulrich TBA Winter 341 

Spring 342 

CTU M-380, 385, 390 
Basic Ministry Practicum 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Staff TBA Fall 380 

Winter 385 
Spring 390 

CTU M-517 
Reconciliation Practicum 

(For course description see Winter, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Ostdiek T 7 - 9:30 p.m. Winter 

Ostdiek T 1:30 -4 Spring 

II. ADVANCED 

MTS M-405 

Field Education Seminar 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Jarvis TBA Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



DIT M-443 

Pastoral Care of the Mentally 111 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 
Ministry). 

Ulrich T Fall 

Spring 

DIT M-444 

Pastoral Care of the Physically 111 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 
Ministry). 

Ulrich T Fall 

Spring 

CTU M-480, 481, 482 
Advanced Ministry Practicum : 
Religious Education 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Lucinio TBA Fall 480 

Winter 481 
Spring 482 

CTU M-483, 484, 485 

Advanced Ministry Practicum : Spirituality 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Lozano TBA Fall 483 

Winter 484 
Spring 485 

CTU M-486, 487, 488 

Advanced Ministry Practicum : Worship 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Keifer TBA Fall 486 

Winter 487 
Spring 488 

CTU M-489, 490, 491 
Advanced Ministry Practicum : 
Community Development 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Boberg TBA Fall 489 

Winter 490 
Spring 491 

CTU M-492, 493, 494 
Advanced Ministry Practicum: 
Social Justice 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Szura TBA Fall 492 

Winter 493 
Spring 494 



118 



Interdisciplinary /Integrative Studies 



Supervised Ministry 



CTU M-518 
Worship Practicum 

(For course description see Winter, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Keifer T 1:30 -4 p.m. Win ter 

Ostdiek T 7 -9:30p.m. Spring 

DIT M-540 

Intensive Clinical Pastoral Education 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Supervisor TBA Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

DIT M-541, 542, 543 

Pastoral Care Through Ministerial Supervision 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Staff TBA Fall 

Winter 
Spring 

DIT M-550, 551, 552 
The Ministry Education 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Clark TBA Fall 500 

Winter 551 
Spring 552 

DIT M-553, 554, 555 

Pastoral Care to the Imprisoned 

(For course description see Fall, Supervised 

Ministry). 

Ulrich TBA Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



CCTS Practica 



CCTS M-620A, B, C 



Practicum in 

Congregational Care 



CCTSM-622A-F 



Practicum in Marriage 
and Family Counseling 



CCTS M-624A-F 



Practicum in Pastoral 
Psycholtherapy 



CCTS M-626A, B, C 



Practicum in Group 
Work and Group Coun- 
seling 



CCTS M-628A, B, C 



Practicum in Geriatric 
Pastoral Care 



CCTS M-630A, B, C 



Practicum in Drug Use 
and Abuse 



CCTS M-634A, B, C 



Practicum in Religion and 
Medicine 



CCTS M-636A, B, C Practicum in Community 
Mental Health 



CCTS M-638A, B, C Practicum in Clinical 
Pastoral Education 



(For course description see Fall, Supervised 
Ministry). 

INTERDISCIPLINARY/ 
INTEGRATIVE STUDIES 

CTU 1-595 

Heritage Colloquium 

This is an offering to M.Div. candidates toward 
the end of their course of studies. Conducted in 
seminar style, it depends in part on peer 
evaluation of a paper that addresses the 
Christian heritage. This colloquium is designed 
to facilitate the writing and completion of this 
paper in an organized manner, so as to fulfill a 
major requirement for the professional resume. 
It is an interdisciplinary enterprise both by 
reason of the scope of the heritage paper to be 
written and by reason of the composition of 
faculty participation. 
Szura/Linnan W 7 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 



CCTS 1-560 (2 or 3 full courses) 

Cross Cultural Communication: Intensive 



The Intensive has a double major thrust which 
will serve the needs and goals of a wide variety 
of students. On the one hand, it will give high 
priority to those students who desire to work or 
study in another cultural environment and will 
help them acquire beginning levels of com- 
petence for effective communication in cultures 
and subcultures other than their own. At the 
same time, the concentration will provide a 
wider range of students the opportunity to ex- 
perience in a unique way the cultural assump- 
tions and limits of their theological thinking, 
and to lay the foundation for a broader in- 
ternational, interracial and ecumenical un- 
derstanding, concern and commitment both in 
their theological education as well as in their 
further ministry. 
Barb our /BobergM 9-3 W 3 -9 Spring 




119 



CLUSTER PERSONNEL 

FACULTY AND EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 



Philip A. Anderson (CTS) Professor of 
Pastoral Theology 
B.A. Macalester College; BD, 
Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D. University of Edinburgh. 

Philip V. Anderson (LSTC) Instructor, 
Director of Chaplaincy Services, 
Augustana Hospital 
B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; 
Study, University of Chicago. 

C. Douglas Amidon (NBTS) Adjunct 
Instructor in Christian Education 
(Regional Director, Young Life) 
B.A., University of California at 
Los Angeles; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School. 

Louis Arceneaux, CM. (DIT) Sacra- 
mental and Pastoral Theology 
A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, 
Perryville, Mo., 1962; S.T.L. Sant' 
Anselmo, Rome, 1967; S.T.D., 
Sant' Anselmo, Rome, 1969. 

Ruben P. Armendariz (MTS) Professor 
of Ministry and Director of the 
Latino Studies Program 
B.A., University of Texas; B.D., 
Austin Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary; Study, Presbyterian In- 
stitute of Industrial Relations. 

Roger C. Arnold, S.V.D. (CTU) Lec- 
turer in Pastoral Psychology 
B.A., Divine Word Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., Loyola University. 

Rose Horman Arthur (CCTS) As- 
sociate Director and Coordinator of 
Academic Affairs; (M/L) Adjunct 
Professor of Women in Religion 
B.S., St. Louis University; M.A. 
St. Mary's Graduate School of 
Theology (Notre Dame, Ind.); 
Th.D., Graduate Theological 



Union (Berkeley, Calif.); Research/ 
Resource Associate in Women's 
Studies, Harvard Divinity School. 

Homer U. Ashby, Jr. (MTS) Assistant 
Professor of Ministry and Director 
of Personal and Professional 
Development 

B.A., Princeton University; M.Th., 
D.Min., University of Chicago; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Raymond J. Bakke (NBTS) Associate 
Profess or of M in is try 
Moody Bible Institute; B.A., Seat- 
tle Pacific College; M.Div., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School; 
S.T.M., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Claude Marie Barbour (CTU) Assistant 
Professor of World Mission Studies 
S.T.M., New York Theological 
Seminary; S.T.D., Garrett-Evan- 
gelical Theological Seminary. 

Pius J. Barth, O.F.M. (CTU) Lecturer 
in Religious Education ^afzce/fc 

B.A., Quincy College; M.A., Case- 
Western Reserve University; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago. 

V. Wayne Barton (BTS) Visiting Lec- 
turer in New Testament Greek 
(Pastor, United Church of Christ- 
Congregational, Wayne, Illinois) 
B.A., Louisiana College; B.D., 
Th.D., New Orleans Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

Fred A. Baumer, C.PP.S (CTU) Assis- 
tant Professor of Preaching and 
Communications 

B.A., M.A., University of Day- 
ton; M.F.A., Catholic University of 
America. (Academic Leave, 1981- 
82). 



120 



Robert Benne (LSTC) Professor of 
Church and Society 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago; Study, University of 
Erlangen, University of Hamburg, 
and University of Cambridge. 

Dianne Bergant, C.S.A. (CTU) Assis- 
tant Professor of Old Testament 
Studies 

B.S., Marian College; M.A., 
Ph.D., St. Louis University. 

Reidar B. Bjornard (NBTS) Professor 
of Old Testament 

Cand. Theol., University of Oslo; 
Th.D., Southern Baptist 

Theological Seminary; Study, Up- 
psala University; American School 
of Oriental Research, Jerusalem. 

Bjorn Bjornsson (LSTC) Visiting Schol- 
ar (Christian Ethics) 
Cand. Theol., University of 
Iceland; Th.D., Edinburgh; Study, 
University of Chicago Divinity 
School, University of Copenhagen. 

Colvin Blanford (NBTS) Associate 
Professor of Ministry and Director 
of Black Church Studies 
B.A., San Francisco State College; 
B.D., Berkeley Baptist Divinity 
School; Rel.D., School of Theology 
at Claremont. 

John Boberg, S.V.D., (CTU) Professor 
of Mission Theology 
B.A., Divine Word Seminary, 
Techny; S.T.L., D.Miss., Pontifical 
Gregorian University, Rome. 

Leonard Bogdan (CTU) Lecturer in 
Canon Law 

B.A., Loyola University; M.A., St. 
Mary of the Lake Seminary; J.C.B., 
J.C.L., J. CD., Lateran University, 
Rome. 

Robert G. Boling (MTS) Professor of 
Old Testament 

B.S., Indiana State College; 
M.Div., McCormick Theological 



Seminary; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 
University; Study, American 
School of Oriental Research, 
Jerusalem. 

Jean Bozeman (LSTC) Associate 
Professor of Educational Ministry 
and Dean of Students 
A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., 
Temple University; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Chicago; Study at Michigan 
State University, Millersville State 
College. 

Carl E. Braaten (LSTC) Professor of 
Systematic Theology 
A.B., St. Olaf College; B.Th., 
Luther Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Harvard University; 
Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Paris (Sorbonne); Sinclair Kennedy 
Traveling Fellow, University of 
Heidelberg. 

Dale W. Brown (BTS) Professor of 
Christian Theology 
B.A., McPherson College; B.D., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe (CCTS) (M/L) 
Professor Emeritus of Theology and 
Science 

Sc.D., Meadville/Lombard Theo- 
logical School. 

John E. Burkhart (MTS) Professor of 
Systematic Theology 
B.A., D.D., Occidental College; 
B.D., Union Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Southern 
California; Study, University 
College/London. 

Edward F. Campbell (MTS) Francis A. 
McGaw Professor of Old Testament 
B.A., Yale University; B.D., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Ian M. Chapman (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor in the Doctor of Ministry 
Program (Pastor, Third Baptist 
Church, St. Louis) 



121 



B.A., University of Hawaii; B.D., 
Eastern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. Study: 
University of California, Santa Bar- 
bara; Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

John F. Clark, CM. (DIT) Pastoral 
Care - Recruitment 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, 
Perryville, Mo., 1965; M.R.E., 
University of St. Thomas, Houston, 
Texas, 1975. 

Adela Yarbro Collins (MTS) Associate 
Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Pomona College; M.A., 
Ph.D., Harvard University; Study, 
University of Portland; University 
of Tubingen. 

Marilyn K. Creel (CCTS) Coordinator, 
United Community College 
Ministry Organizing Board for 
Illinois 

B.A., Syracuse University; M.Div., 
United Theological Seminary of the 
Twin Cities; Study, University of 
Chicago. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Librarian 
and Assistant Professor of 
Historical Theology 
B.A., Houghton College; B.D., 
Yale Divinity School; M.S., 
University of Kentucky; Ph.D., 
(Candidate) University of Chicago; 
Study: Columbia University; 
Union Theological Seminary; 
American Institute of Holy Land 
Studies; Asbury Theological 
Seminary; University of Tubingen. 

Raymond Diesbourg, M.S.C. (CTU) 
Instructor in Ethics 
B.A., DePaul University; M.Div., 
Catholic Theological Union; 
S.T.L., S.T.D., (Cand.), Lateran 
University, Rome. 

Carl S. Dudley (MTS) Professor of 
Church and Community 
B.A., Cornell University; M.Div., 



Union Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Study, New York School 
of Social Work, Washington 
University, Industrial Areas Foun- 
dation. 

Donald F. Durnbaugh (BTS) Professor 
of Church History 

B.A., Manchester College; M.A., 
University of Michigan; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Ralph H. Elliott (NBTS) Adjunct Pro- 
fessor in Ministry and Senior 
Minister, North Shore Baptist Chur- 
ch, Chicago 

A.B., Carson Newman College; 
B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., Southern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Post 
Graduate - Visiting Scholar, Union 
Theological Seminary; Additonal 
Study: Yale Divinity School, Prin- 
ceton Theological Seminary, In- 
ternational Theological Seminary; 
University of Hamburg, Berlin, 
Munich, W. Germany, Lancaster 
Theological Seminary. 

J. Ronald Engel (M/L) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Social Ethics 
A.B., Johns Hopkins University; 
B.D., Meadville Theological 
School; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Norman R. Ericson (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor of New Testament 
A. A., Trinity Seminary and Bible 
College, Chicago; B.A., University 
of Nebraska, Lincoln; B.D., Trinity 
Evangelical Divinity School, 
Chicago; Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Nancy R. Faus (BTS) Assistant Profes- 
sor of Church Music and Campus 
Minister 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; 
M.A., Columbia University. 

Thomas N. Finger (NBTS) Associate 
Professor of Systematic Theology 



122 



B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Gor- 
don Divinity School; Ph.D., School 
of Theology at Claremont; 
Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Munich. 

James A. Fischer, CM. (DIT) Profes- 
sor of Old Testament 
S.T.L., Catholic University of 
America, Washington, D.C., 1949; 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute, 
Rome, 1951. 

Robert H. Fischer (LSTC) Professor of 
Church History 

A.B., Gettysburg College; B.D., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, 
Gettysburg; Ph.D., Yale Univer- 
sity. Study at Tubingen University. 

Archimedes Fornasari, M. C.C.J. 

(CTU) Lecturer in Ethics 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University; 

Ph.D., Catholic University of 

America. 

David J. Frenchak (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor of Pastoral Care and 
Counseling 

B.A., Toccoa Falls College; M.Div. 
Bethel Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Andover-Newton 
Theological School. 

Wesley J. Fuerst (LSTC) Professor of 
Old Testament 

A.B., Midland Lutheran College; 
M.Div., Central Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., Prin- 
ceton Theological Seminary; Study, 
University of Erlangen. 

Yoshio Fukuyama (CTS) Professor of 
Religion and Society and Academic 
Dean 

A.B., Doane College; M.Div., 
Chicago Theological Seminary and 
the University of Chicago; Ph.D., 
in Sociology of Religion, University 
of Chicago; D.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Ismael Garcia (MTS) Instructor in 
Christian Ethics and Assistant in the 
Latino Studies Program 



B.A., University of Puerto Rico; 
M.A., Ph.D. (cand.)., University of 
Chicago. 

Richard B. Gardner (BTS) Visiting Lec- 
turer in Biblical Studies and Direc- 
tor of Education for a Shared 
Ministry Program (Consultant for 
Biblical Resources, Parish Ministries 
Commission, Office of the General 
Board of the Church of the 
Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., Juniata College; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
D.Theol., University of Wurzburg. 

John Charles Godbey (M/L) Professor 
of Church History 

A.B., Nebraska Wesley an Univer- 
sity; B.D., Federated Theological 
Faculty, University of Chicago; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago; Study, Polish Academy of 
Sciences. 

William H. Goddard (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor in Ministry and Sr. 
Pastor, First Baptist Church, Oak 
Park, Illinois 

B.A., University of Denver; B.D., 
Yale* University Divinity School; 
S.T.M., Yale Divinity School; 
D.Min., McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 

Jorge Gonzalez (MTS) Lecturer in 
Hispanic Studies 

B.A., Candler College, Marianao, 
Cuba; T.S.B., Seminario 

Evangelico de Teologia Mantanzas, 
Cuba; Ph.D., Emory University. 

Warren F. Groff (BTS) Professor of 
Christian Theology and President 
B.A., Juniata College; B.D., Yale 
Divinity School; Ph.D., Yale 
University. 

Carolyn Groves (DIT) Lecturer in 
Historical Theology 
A.B., Manhattanville College, Pur- 
chase, N.Y., 1970; M.A., Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Chicago, 111., 1974; 
Doctoral Candidate, University of 
Chicago, Chicago, 111. 



123 



Nicholas Groves (DIT) Lecturer in 
Church History 

A.B., Duke University, Durham, 
N.C., 1967; M.A., University of 
Chicago, Chicago, 111., 1969; Doc- 
toral Candidate, University of 
Chicago, Chicago, 111. 

Robert Guelich (NBTS) Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., Wheaton College; M.A., 
University of Illinois; S.T.B., Fuller 
Theological Seminary; D.Theol., 
University of Hamburg. Further 
Study: University of Aberdeen and 
Humboldt Scholar, University of 
Tubingen. 

Hugh F. Halverstadt (MTS) Professor- 
ial Lecturer in Ministry and Area 
Group Coordinator in the Doctor of 
M in is try Program 

B.A., King College; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary in Virginia; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University. 

Zachary Hayes, O.F.M. (CTU) Profes- 
sor of Doctrinal Theology 
B.A., Quincy College; Dr.Theol., 
Friederich-Wilhelm University, 
Bonn; Litt.D., St. Bonaventure 
University. 

Shirley J. Heckmann (BTS) Visiting 
Lecturer in Christian Education 
(Consultant for Educational 
Development, Parish Ministries 
Commission, Office of the General 
Board of the Church of the 
Brethren, Elgin) 

B.A., University of Denver; 
M.R.E., Iliff School of Theology; 
Ph.D., University of Denver. 

Philip J. Hefner (LSTC) Professor of 
Systematic Theology 
A.B., Midland Lutheran College- 
rs/!. Div., Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Tubingen. (Sabbatical, Spring 
Quarter.) 



Allegra Hess (BTS) Adjunct Faculty 
and Counselor/ Therapist, Luther- 
brook Children's Center 
B.A., Bridgewater College, M.S., 
Indiana University; M.S., George 
Williams College. 

Earle Hilgert (MTS) Professor of Bib- 
liography and Biblical Studies 
B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., 
Adventist Theological Seminary; 
M.A., University of Chicago; 
D.Theol., University of Basel. 

Elvire Hilgert (MTS) Professorial Lec- 
turer in Theological Librarianship 
B.A., Pacific Union College; M.S. 
in L.S., Catholic University of 
America; Study, Mills College; Ad- 
ventist Theological Seminary; 
University of the Philippines; 
University of Basel. 

Leslie J. Hoppe, O.F.M. (CTU) Assis- 
tant Professor of Old Testament 
Studies 

B.A., St. Francis College; M.A., 
Aquinas Institute of Theology; 
Ph.D., Northwestern University 
and Garrett-Evangelical Theological 
Seminary. 

Estella Boggs Horning (BTS) Visiting 
Lecturer in Biblical Studies 
B.A., Manchester College; R.N., 
Presbyterian Hospital; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D. (cand.), Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary and North- 
western University. 

Kathleen Hughes, R. S.C.J. (CTU) 
Assistant Professor of Liturgy 
B.A., Newton College; M.A., 
Catholic University of America; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre 
Dame. 

Cynthia Ann Jarvis (MTS) Assistant 
Professor of Ministry and Director 
of Field Based Programs 
B.A., Denison University; M.Div., 
Vanderbilt University Divinity 
School; Study, Boston University 
School of Theology. 



124 



E. Alfred Jenkins (NBTS) Professor of 
Christian Education and Director of 
Doctoral Studies 

B.A., Wheaton College; B.D., Nor- 
thern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago; Study: Harvard 
University. CPE, Presbyterian-St. 
Luke's Hospital, Chicago. 

Emmett V. Johnson (NBTS) Summer 
School Visiting Professor in 
Evangelism (Director of 

Evangelism, American Baptist 
Churches) 

B.A., University of Minnesota; 
B.D., Bethel Theological Seminary; 
D.Min., Luther Theological 
Seminary; Study, Wisconsin State 
College. 

Robert Karris, O.F.M. (CTU) Profes- 
sor of New Testament Studies 
B.A., Quincy College; S.T.B., Pon- 
tifical Athenaeum Antonianum, 
Rome; S.T.L., Catholic University 
of America; Th.D., Harvard 
University. (Sabbatical, Winter 
Quarter) . 

Ralph Keifer (CTU) Associate Profes- 
sor of Liturgy 

B.A., Providence College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Notre Dame. 

James E. Kelly, C.S.C. (CTU) Lecturer 
in Sociology of Religion 
B.A., M.A., University of Notre 
Dame; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina. 

LeRoy E. Kennel (BTS) Professor of 
Commun ica tions 

B.A., Goshen College; M.A., Iowa 
State University; B.D., Goshen 
College Biblical Seminary; Ph.D., 
Michigan State University. 

Axel C. Kildegaard (LSTC) Professor 
of Functional Theology 
A.B., State University of Iowa; 
Cand. TheoL, Grand View 
Seminary; S.T.M., Yale University. 



Andre Lacocque (CTS) Professor of 
Old Testament and Director, Center 
for Jewish-Christian Studies 
D.Litt., D. TheoL, University of 
Strasbourg. 

Eugene A. LaVerdiere, S.S.S. (CTU) 
Associate Professor of New 
Testament Studies 
M.A., John Carroll University 
S.T.L., University of Fribourg 
S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute 
Eleve Titulaire, Ecole Biblique, 
Jerusalem; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Chicago. 

Perry D. LeFevre (CTS) Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., Harvard University; B.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Albert Lehenbauer (NBTS) Clinical In- 
structor in Pastoral Care 
A.A., St. John's College, Winfield, 
Ks.; B.A., Concordia Seminary; 
M.R.E., N.O. Baptist Theological 
Seminary; Ed.D., N.O. Baptist 
Thelogical Seminary; Study, 
College of Charleston, S.C.; 
Maryland University; C.P.E., 
Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis; 
Southern Baptist Hospital, New 
Orleans, (1963); University 
Hospitals, Minneapolis (1964); 
Swedish Covenant Hospital, 
Chicago (1971); Certification by 
American Protestant Hospital 
Association (1968); Professional 
Hospital Chaplain; Fellow College 
of Chaplains; APHA. 

William E. Lesher (LSTC) President 
A.B., Wittenberg University; 
M.Div., Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; D.D., 
California Lutheran College; D.D., 
Pacific Lutheran University. 

Thomas Libera (DIT) Pastoral Theo- 
logy 

S.T.L., St. Mary of the Lake 
Seminary, Mundelein, Illinois; 
M.Div., St. Mary of the Lake 
Seminary, Mundelein, 111. 



125 



David L. Lindberg (LSTC) Associate 

Professor of Missions and Director 

of Field Education 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; 

M.Div., Augustana Theological 

Seminary; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Chicago. 
John Linnan, C.S.V. (CTU) Acting 

President and Associate Professor of 

Doctrinal Theology 

B.A., Georgetown University; 

S.T.B., M.A., S.T.L., S.T.D., 

University of Louvain. 

Wilhelm C. Linss (LSTC) Professor of 
New Testament 

B.D. (equiv), University of 
Erlangen; Th.D., Boston University 
School of Theology; Study, Univer- 
sity of Munster; University of 
Michigan. 

John M. Lozano, C.M.F. (CTU) Pro- 
fessor of Spiritual Theology 
B.A., Claretian College; S.T.L., 
Universite Catholique de l'Ouest, 
Angers; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical 
Institute, Rome; S.T.D., University 
of St. Thomas, Rome. (Sabbatical, 
Fall Quarter). 

Jeanette Lucinio, S.P. (CTU) Instructor 
in Religious Education 
B.S., St. Mary of the Woods 
College; M.A., Mundelein College. 

Joel W. Lundeen (LSTC) Adjunct Pro- 
fessor 

B.A., Augustana College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; 
A.M., University of Chicago; 
Study at MacPhail School of Music; 
Augustana College; Chicago Con- 
servatory of Music. 

George P. Magnuson (MTS) Professor- 
ial Lecturer in Church and Ministry 
and Major Project Coordinator in 
the Doctor of Ministry Program 
B.A., University of Minnesota; 
B.D., North Park Theological 
Seminary; M.A., D.Min., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary. 



Robert W. Mallonee, S.V.D. (CTU) 
Associate Professor of Pastoral Care 
B.A., Baldwin-Wallace College; 
M.A., Loyola University, Chicago; 
M.A.L.S., Rosary College; D.Min., 
Chicago Theological Seminary. 

Clyde L. Manschreck (CTS) Professor 
of Church History and Director, 
Center for Reformation and Free 
Church Studies 

B.A., George Washington Univer- 
sity; B.D., Garrett Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

David J. McGown (CCTS) Campus 
Minister, University of Illinois at 
Chicago Circle. Executive Secretary 
of the Chicago Metropolitan Cam- 
pus Ministry Foundation. Director, 
United Community College 
Ministry Organzing Board for 
Illinois. 

B.A., Yale University; B.D., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary; 
Study, New York Theological 
Seminary; San Diego State College; 
Kansas State University. 

Duncan Mcintosh (NBTS) Visiting 
Summer School Professor and 
Resource Developer, Evangelism 
Staff, National Ministries, 
American Baptist Churches of the 
USA. 

B.Mus., Houghton College; B.D., 
Th.M., Fuller Theological 
Seminary; D.Min., Eastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

Lauree Hersch Meyer (BTS) Assistant 
Professor in Historical Theology 
B.A., Bridgewater College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Walter L. Michel (LSTC) Associate 
Professor of Old Testament 
B.D. (equiv.), University of Vien- 
na; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin; Study, University of 
Heidelberg; Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Western 



126 



Michigan University; Yale Univer- 
sity. 

Donald E. Miller (BTS) Professor of 
Christian Education and Ethics and 
Director of Graduate Studies 
M.A., University of Chicago; B.D., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Harvard University; Study, 
Yale University; Cambridge 
University. 

John P. Minogue, CM. (DIT) Ethics, 
Systematic Theology 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, 
Perryville, Mo., 1968; M.A., 
DePaul University, Chicago, 111., 
1975; Doctoral Candidate, Catholic 
University of America, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Christopher Moore (M/L) Adjunct 
Lecturer in Ministry of Music 
(Minister of Music, First Unitarian 
Society, Chicago) 

A.B., Harvard; B.D., Mead- 
ville/Lombard, S.T.M., Harvard 
University. 

Robert L. Moore (CTS) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Theology and Personality 
B.A., Hendrix College; M.Th., 
Southern Methodist University; 
M.Th., Duke University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Alfred Adler Institute, 
Chicago. 

Jorge L. Morales (MTS) Adjunct Lec- 
turer in Ministry 

B.A., Northeastern Illinois Univer- 
sity; M.Div., McCormick 
Theological Seminary. 

Eleanor Morrison (CTS) Visiting Pro- 
fess orofMin is try 

A.B., Wesleyan University; M.A., 
Garrett Evangelical Theological 
Seminary; L.L.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Truman Morrison (CTS) Visiting Pro- 
fess orofMin is try 
A.B., Birmingham Southern; B.D., 



Chicago Theological Seminary; 
D.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary. 

Osvaldo Luis Mottesi (NBTS) Assis- 
tant Professor of Religion and 
Society and Director of Hispanic 
Studies 

B.S., Polytechnic Institute, Buenos 
Aires; L.Soc, University of Argen- 
tina; B.Th., Latin American 
Biblical Seminary, San Jose, Costa 
Rica; Th.M., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., (candidate), 
Emory University. Study, In- 
ternational Baptist Theological 
Seminary, Buenos Aires and Prin- 
ceton University. 

Lewis S. Mudge (MTS) Dean of the 
Seminary and Professor of 
Theology 

B.A., Princeton University; B.A., 
M.A., Oxford University; B.D., 
Princeton Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Amherst College; Ph.D., 
Princeton University; Study, 
University of Marburg; University 
of Paris. 

William R. Myers (NBTS) President 
B.A., University of Cincinnati; 
B.D., Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; D.D., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Study, 
Union Theological Seminary; Prin- 
ceton Theological Seminary. 

Thomas Nairn, O.F.M. (CTU) In- 
structor in Ethics 

B.A., Quincy College; M.Div., 
M.A., Catholic Theological Union; 
Ph.D. (cand.), University of 
Chicago. 

Robert Navarro (LSTC) Coordinator 
of Hispanic Ministry Program 
B.A. (equiv.), Escuela nacional de 
maestros, Mexico City; B.D., Wart- 
burg Theological Seminary; Study 
at McCormick Theological 
Seminary. 



127 



if 



Robert W. Neff (BTS) Visiting lectur- 
er, General Secretary, Office of the 
General Board, Church of the 
Brethren 

B.S., Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity; B.D., Yale Divinity School; 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; 
Study, Cambridge University. 

F. Burton Nelson (CCTS) Professor of 
Theology and Ethics, North Park 
Theological Seminary 
B.A., Brown University; B.D., Yale 
University Divinity School; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University and 
Garrett Theological Seminary; 
Study, North Park Theological 
Seminary. 

William R. Nelson (NBTS) Associate 
Professor of Ministry and Director 
of Field Services 

B.S., College of Charleston; B.D., 
Th.M., Southern Baptist 

Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Prin- 
ceton Theological Seminary; 
Fulbright Scholar, University of 
Heidelberg. 

Lawrence Nemer, S.V.D. (CTU) As- 
sociate Professor of Church History 
B.A., St. Mary's Seminary, Techny; 
L.Miss., Gregorian University, 
Rome; M.A., Catholic University, 
Washington; Ph.D., Cambridge 
University. 

Thomas More Newbold, C.P. (CTU) 
^.Professor Emeritus of Pastoral 
$y Theology 

B.A., Holy Cross Academic In- 
stitute, Chicago; Maitre-es-Sc- 
Med., L'Institut d'Etude Medieval 
D' Albert le Grand; Ph.D., Univer- 
sity of Montreal. 

Morris J. Niedenthal (LSTC) Professor 
of Functional Theology 
B.S., Northwestern University; 
M.Div.,; Chicago Lutheran 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; 
Fulbright Scholar, Manchester 
University. 



N. Leroy Norquist (LSTC) Associate 
Professor of New Testament 
A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; 
S.T.M., Wittenberg University; 
Ph.D., Hartford Seminary Foun- 
dation; Study, Princeton 
Theological Seminary. (Sabbatical, 
Spring Quarter.) 

Eric H. Ohlmann (NBTS) Professor of 
Christian Heritage 
B.A., University of Alberta; B.D., 
North American Baptist Seminary; 
Th.M., Southern Baptist 

Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
Graduate Theological Union; 
Study, Predigerseminar, Hamburg. 

Kenneth O'Malley, C.P. (CTU) Asso- 
ciate Professor of Bibliography 
M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois; Study, 
University of Detroit; Loyola 
University, Chicago; Saint Louis 
University; Spalding College. 

Carolyn A. Osiek, R.S.C.J. (CTU) 
Assistant Professor of New 
Testament Studies 
B.A., Fontbonne College, St. Louis; 
M.A.T., Manhattanville College; 
Th.D., Harvard University. (Sab- 
batical, Spring Quarter) . 

Gilbert Ostdiek, O.F.M. (CTU) Pro- 
fessor of Liturgy 

S.T.L., S.T.D., L.G., Pontifical 
Athenaeum Antonianum, Rome; 
Study, Harvard University; Univer- 
sity of California. 

Thomas D. Parker (MTS) Professor of 
Systematic Theology 
B.A., Los Angeles State College; 
B.D., San Francisco Theological 
Seminary; Th.D., Princeton 
Theological Seminary; Study 
University of Munich. 

Cecil Parres, CM. (DIT) Professor of 
Canon Law 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, 
Perryville, Mo., 1942; J. CD., St. 
Thomas University, Rome 1953. 



128 



John T. Pawlikowski, O.S.M. (CTU) 
Professor of Ethics and Director of 
M.A. Program 

A.B., Loyola University, Chicago; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Hayim Goren Perelmuter (CTU) Chau- 
tauqua Professor of Jewish Studies 
B.A., McGill University, Montreal; 
M.H.L., Jewish Institute of 
Religion, New York; D.H.L., 
Hebrew Union College-Jewish In- 
stitute of Religion; D.D., Hebrew 
Union College, Cincinnati. 

Albert P. Pero, Jr. (LSTC) Associate 
Professor of Theology and Cross 
Cultural Studies 

A.B., M.A., University of Detroit; 
B.Th., Concordia Theological 
Seminary, Springfield; S.T.D., 
Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago. 

Patrick Persaud (LSTC) Instructor in 
New Testament Greek 
A.B., Carthage College; B.D., 
S.T.M., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 

John Piippo (NBTS) Adjunct Instructor 
in Theology 

B.A., Northern Illinois University; 
M.Div., Northern Baptist 
Seminary; Ph.D. (Candidate), Nor- 
thwestern-Garrett Evangelical 
Theological Seminary. 

Richard P. Poethig (MTS) Professorial 
Lecturer in Church and Industrial 
Society and Director of the Institute 
on the Church in Urban-Industrial 
Society 

B.A., College of Wooster; M.Div., 
Union Theological Seminary; 
Study, Ateneo University of 
Manila; Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology. 

James N. Poling (BTS) Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pastoral Care and Coun- 
seling 

B.A., Bridgewater College; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 



Ph.D., School of Theology in 
Claremont. 

Marcus J. Priester (MTS) Professor of 
Christian Education 
B.A., D.D., Grove City College; 
S.T.B., S.T.M., Western 

Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
University of Toronto; Study, 
Clarion State Teacher College. 

Wayne F. Prist (DIT). Sacramental 
Theology 

B.A., Scholastic Philosophy, St. 
Mary of the Lake Seminary, Mun- 
delein, III., 1963; S.T.B., St. Mary 
of the Lake Sem., Mundelein, 111., 
1965. M.A. Theology, St. Mary of 
the Lake Sem., 1966; S.T.L., St. 
Mary of the Lake Sem., 1967; 
M.A., Philosophy, Loyola Univer- 
sity of Chicago, Chicago, 111. 1975. 
D.Min. Candidate, St. Mary of the 
Lake Sem., Mundelein, 111., 1976. 

David C. Reeves (MTS) Albert G. Mc- 
Gaw Professor of New Testament 
B.A., Occidental College; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Harvard University; Study, 
University of Gottingen. 

Gene Reeves (M/L) Professor of The- 
ology, Dean and Chief Executive 
A.B., University of New Hamp- 
shire; S.T.B., Boston University; 
Ph.D., Emory University. 

V. Bruce Rigdon (MTS) Professor of 
Church History 

B.A., College of Wooster; B.D., 
Yale Divinity School; M.A., Ph.D., 
Yale University; Study, Oxford 
University. 

Paul V. Robb, S.J. (LSTC) Assistant 
Professor of Systematic Theology 
(Director, Institute for Spiritual 
leadership) <%*&// ^ 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.D., ^ 
S.T.L., West Baden College; M.A., 
Ph.D., Loyola University of 
Chicago. 



129 



Charles Shelby Rooks (CTS) Associate 
Professor of Ministry and President 
B.A., Virginia State College; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; D.D., 
College of Wooster; Study, Colum- 
bia University; Oxford University. 

Eugene F. Roop (BTS) Professor of 
Biblical Studies 

B.S., Manchester College; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., Claremont Graduate School. 

Theodore C. Ross, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer 
in Church History 

Litt.B., Xavier University; Ph.L., 
West Baden College; M.A. 
(History), M.A. (Theology), Loyola 
University of Chicago; S.T.L., 
Bellarmine School of Theology. 

Byron P. Royer (BTS) Professor Emer- 
itus of Pastoral Psychology 
B.S., Manchester College; B.D., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Northwestern University; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

James Savolainen (LSTC) Instructor in 
Greek 

B.A., Augsburg College; M.Div., 
Th.M., Lutheran School of 
Theology at Chicago. 

Margaret M. Sawin (NBTS) Summer 
School Visiting Professor (Con- 
sultant in Family Education, 
Rochester, NY.) 

B.Sc.Ed., State University of New 
York; M.R.E., Eastern Baptist 
Theological Seminary; Ed.D., 
University of Maryland. 

Thomas A. Schafer (MTS) Professor 
of Church History 

B.A., Maryville College; B.D., 
Louisville Presbyterian Theological 
Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University. 

James A. Scherer (LSTC) Professor 
of Missions and Church History 
A.B., Yale University; B.D., Th.D., 
Union Theological Seminary; 
Study, Chicago Lutheran 



Theological Seminary; Columbia 
University; International Christian 
University, Japan; Oxford Univer- 
sity. 

J. Peter Schineller, S.J. (CTU) Lecturer 

in Theology <?a/tcellA 

A.B., M.A., Fordham University ; 
Ph.L., B.D., Woodstock College; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Calvin H. Schmitt (MTS) Professor of 
Bibliography, Archivist and Direc- 
tor of Placement 

B.A., University of Dubuque; 
M.Div., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Litt.D., Alma College- 
Study, University of New Mexico; 
Union Theological Seminary; 
Columbia University. 

Robert J. Schreiter, C.PP.S. (CTU) 
Associate Professor of Doctrinal 
Theology and Dean 
B.A., St. Joseph's College; Th.Dr., 
University of Nijmegen; Study, Ox- 
ford University. 

W. Widick Schroeder (CTS) Professor 
of Religion and Society 
B.A., Bethel College; M.A., 
Michigan State University; B.D., 
Chicago Theological Seminary; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Robin J. Scroggs (CTS) Professor of 
New Testament 

B.A., B.Mus., University of North 
Carolina; B.D., Duke University; 
Ph.D., Princeton University. 

Robert C. Schultz (DIT) Psychology 
M.Div., Concordia Theological 
Seminary, St. Louis, Mo., 1952; 
Dr. Theol., Friedrich Alexander 
University, Erlangen, Germany, 
1956; Post Graduate Study; Har- 
vard Divinity School; Menninger 
Foundation. 

Donald Senior, C.P. (CTU) Associate 
Professor of New Testament Studies 
B.A., Holy Cross Academic In- 



130 



stitute, Chicago; Baccalaureat en 
Theologie, S.T.L., S.T.D., Univer- 
sity of Louvain. 

Jack L. Seymour (CTS) Assistant Pro- 

.\A fessor of Religious Education and 

^P" Director of Field Education 

^ B.A., Ball State University; 

M.Div., D.Min., Vanderbilt 

University Divinity School; Ph.D. 

(Cand.), George Peabody College. 

Neil H. Shadle (M/L) Associate Pro- 
fessor of Ministry and Dean of 
Students 

A.B., Ohio Wesleyan University; 
B.D., Meadville Theological 
School; D.Min., Pacific School of 
Religion. 

Franklin Sherman (LSTC) Professor of 
Christian Ethics and Dean of Faculty 
A.B., Muhlenberg College; M.Div., 
Chicago Lutheran Theological 
Seminary; M.A., Oxford Univer- 
sity; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Chicago. 

Joseph Sittler (LSTC) Distinguished 
Professor in Residence 
A.B., LL.D., Wittenberg Univer- 
sity; B.D., Hamma School of 
Theology; D.D., Wagner College; 
L.H.D., Alfred University; Litt.D., 
Meadville Theological School; 
Study, Gettysburg College; Univer- 
sity of Notre Dame; Loyola Univer- 
sity, Chicago; Oberlin College; 
University of Chicago; Western 
Reserve University; University of 
Heidelberg. 

Graydon F. Snyder (BTS) Wieand 
Professor of New Testament Studies 
and Dean 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Princeton Theological 
Seminary; Study, Pontifical In- 
stitute of Christian Archaeology, 
Rome; Cambridge University. 

Joseph Spae, C.I.C.M. (CTU) Visiting 
Professor of Oriental Religions and 



Co-Director, Chicago Institute of 
Theology and Culture 
Ph.D., Columbia University; 
Study, Kyoto University; Univer- 
sity of Louvain; Peking University. 

Alphonse SpiUy, C.PP.S. (CTU) Lec- 
turer in Theology and Human 
Development 

B.A., M.A., University of Dayton; 
Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Charles S. Spivey (CCTS) Senior 
Pastor, Quinn Chapel, African 
Methodist Episcopal Church <%& 
B.S., Wilberforce University; B.D./^ 
Yale Divinity School; Study, 
Oberlin Graduate School of 
Theology; University of Pittsburgh. 

Jack L. Stotts (MTS) President of the 
Seminary and Professor of Christian 
Ethics 

B.A., Trinity University; B.D., Mc- 
Cormick Theological Seminary; 
M.A., Ph.D., Yale University; 
Study, Oxford University. 

Carroll Stuhlmueller, C.P. (CTU) Pro- 
fessor of Old Testament Studies 
B.A., Holy Cross Academic In- 
stitute, Chicago; S.T.L., Catholic 
University; S.S.L., S.S.D., Pon- 
tifical Biblical Institute, Rome; 
D.H.L., St. Benedict College. (Sab- 
batical, Fall and Winter Quarters). 

Paul R. Swanson (LSTC) Professor of 
Pastoral Care 

A.B., Augustana College; M.Div., 
Augustana Theological Seminary; 
S.T.M., Andover-Newton Theo- 
logical School; Ph.D., Boston 
University. 

John Paul Szura, O.S.A. (CTU) Assis- 
tant Professor of Psychology and 
Theology and Director of M.Div. 
Program 

B.A., Villanova University; M.A., 
St. Louis University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Illinois Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., Fordham University. 



131 



George J. Taylor (NBTS) Professor of 
Pastoral Care and Counseling 
Diploma, Escuela Artes y Oficios, 
Panama; Diploma Theology, Latin 
American Biblical Seminary, Costa 
Rica; B.A., Whitmore College; 
M.A., Michigan State University; 
Ph.D., Michigan State University; 
Additional Studies, Fuller 
Theological Seminary. 

Edward Thompson (NBTS) Adjunct 
Professor of Music (Chairman of the 
Fine Arts Div. and Professor of 
Music, Judson College; Ministry of 
Music, First Baptist Church, Elgin) 
B.A., Wheaton College; M.U.S.M., 
American Conservatory; B.D., 
Northern Baptist Theological 
Seminary; D.M.A., American Con- 
servatory; Study, Northern Illinois 
University, Northwestern Univer- 
sity. 

Robert I. Tobias (LSTC) Professor of 
Ecumenics and Director of Doctor 
of Ministry Program 
A.B., Phillips University; M.A., 
Graduate School of Theology, 
Phillips University; B.D., Union 
Theological Seminary; Th.D., 
University of Geneva and Graduate 
School of Ecumenical Studies. 

Larry K. Ulrich (DIT) Field Education 
B.A., Manchester College, N. Man- 
chester, Ind., 1965; M.Div., 
Bethany Theo. Seminary, Oak 
Brook, 111., 1967; S.T.M. Univer- 
sity of Dubuque Theo. Sem., 
Dubuque, Iowa, 1970; D.Min. The 
Chicago Theo. Sem., Chicago, 111., 
1973. 

Philip VanLinden, CM. (DIT) Scrip- 
ture 

A.B., St. Mary's Seminary, 
Perryville, Mo., 1965; S.S.L., Pon- 
tifical Biblical Institute, Rome, 
1972. 

Arthur Voobus (LSTC) Professor 
Emeritus of New Testament and 
Church History 



Cand. TheoL, Mag. Theol., Dr. 
Theol., University of Tartu, 
Estonia. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Librarian 
and Professor of Historical Research 
B.A., Manchester College; B.D., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Don Wardlaw (MTS) Professor of 
Preaching and Worship 
B.A., Columbia College; B.D., 
Union Theological Seminary in 
Virginia; Ph.D., University of 
Aberdeen. 

Peggy Way (MTS) Adjunct Lecturer in 
Ministry 

B.A., University of Michigan; 
B.D., University of Chicago; 
M.S.W., Wayne State University; 
Ph.D., Princeton; D.D., Chicago 
Theological Seminary. 

Carol A. Wehrheim (MTS) Lecturer in 
Christian Education and Assistant 
Director of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program 

B.A., Southern Illinois University; 
M.A.R.E., McCormick Theological 
Seminary; Study, University of 
Maine; Towson State College. 

Frederick K. Wentz (CCTS) Executive 
Director; (LSTC) Adjunct Professor 
B.A., Gettysburg College; B.D., 
Lutheran Theological Seminary, 
Gettysburg; Ph.D., Yale Univer- 
sity; Litt.D., Thiel College; D.D., 
Hartwick College; Study, Univer- 
sity of Southern California. 

David J. Wieand (BTS) Professor 
Emeritus of Biblical Studies 
B.A., Juniata College; M.A., New 
York University; B.D., Bethany 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D., 
University of Chicago; Study, 
Chicago Institute of Psycho- 
analysis; National Training 
Laboratory; National Protestant 



132 



Laboratory, Green Lake; American 
School of Oriental Research, 
Jerusalem; Northeast Career Cen- 
ter, Princeton; Brook Lane 
Psychiatric Center, Hagerstown. 

Robert C. Worley (MTS) Professor of 
Education and Ministry and Direc- 
tor of the Doctor of Ministry 
Program 

B.A., Oklahoma State University; 
D.D.S., M.S., Northwestern 
University; B.D., McCormick 
Theological Seminary; Ed.D., 
Columbia University. 



Hyang Sook Chung Yoon (CTU) Assis- 
tant Professor of Bibliography 
A.B., M.A., Seoul National Univer- 
sity; M.L.S. University of Texas, 
Austin. 

William Young, S.S.S. (CTU) Assis- 
tant Professor of Church History 
B.A., St. Joseph's Seminary; M.A., 
John Carroll University; S.T.M., 
Woodstock College; Eleve titulaire, 
Ecole pratique des haute etudes; 
S.T.D. (cand.), Institut Catholique; 
Ph.D. (cand.), University of Paris- 
Sorbonne. 



LIBRARIANS 



Joan Blocher (CTS) Assistant Librarian 
B.A., University of Redlands; 
M.A.L.S., Rosary College. 

Janet Davidson (JKM) Ecumenical 
Parish Resource Center Librarian, 
Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Millikin College; M.A.C.E., 
McCormick Theological Seminary. 

Donald W. Dayton (NBTS) Librarian, 
The Library of Bethany and Nor- 
thern Baptist Theological 
Seminaries; Director of In- 
structional Services 
B.A., Houghton College; B.D., 
Yale Divinity School; M.S., 
University of Kentucky; Ph.D. 
(cand.), University of Chicago; 
Study, Columbia University; Union 
Theological Seminary; American 
Institute of Holy Land Studies; 
Asbury Theological Seminary; 
University of Tubingen. 

Hedda Durnbaugh (BTS) Special Col- 
lections Librarian, The Library of 
Bethany and Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminaries; (CCTS) 
Library Program Director 
B.A. equivalent, University of Vien- 
na; M.A., Northwestern Univer- 
sity; M.A.L.S., Rosary College- 
Study, Philipps University, Mar- 
burg. 



Eileen Fitzsimons (JKM) Acting Jesuh 
Librarian; Technical Services 
Librarian, Jesuit-Krauss-McCor- 
mick Library 

B.A., St. Olaf College; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Chicago; 
Study, Universities of Aarhus, Mar- 
burg, andMiinster. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L) and (CTS) Li- 
brarian and Assistant Professor of 
Bibliography 

A.B., University of Illinois; B.D., 
Harvard University; M.A., Colum- 
bia University; M.A. (L.S.), 
University of Chicago. 

Francis Germovnik CM. (DIT) Li- 
brarian, Modern and Classical 
Languages 

M.A.L.S., Rosary College, River 
Forest, Illinois, 1967; J.C.L., 
University of St. Thomas, Rome, 
1944; J. CD., University of St. 
Thomas, Rome 1945. 

Brian L. Helge (JKM) Technical Ser- 
vices Librarian, Jesuit-Krauss- 
McCormick Library 
A.B., Indiana University; M.Div., 
Lutheran School of Theology at 
Chicago; M.A., University of Notre 
Dame. 



133 



Earle Hilgert (JKM) Coordinator of 
Collection Development, Jesuit- 
Krauss-McCormick Library 
B.A., Walla Walla College; B.D., 
Adventist Theological Seminary; 
M.A., University of Chicago; D. 
Theol., University of Basel. 

Elvire Hilgert (JKM) McCormick Li- 
brarian; Coordinator of Technical 
Services, Jesuit-Krauss-McCormick 
Library 

B.A., Pacific Union College; M.S. 
in L.S., Catholic University of 
America; Study, Adventist 
Theological Seminary; University 
of the Philippines, Manila; Univer- 
sity of Basel. 

Eileen Hogan (CTU) Periodicals and 
Catalog Librarian 

B.A., St. Andrews Presbyterian 
College; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College; Study, University of 
Chicago. 

Kenneth OTVIalley, C.P. (CTU) Direc- 
tor of Library 

M.A.L.S., University of Michigan; 
Ph.D., University of Illinois; Study, 
University of Detroit; Loyola 
University, Chicago; Saint Louis 
University; Spalding College. 



Kenneth M. Shaffer (BTS) Acquisi- 
tions, Librarian, The Library of 
Bethany and Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminaries 
A.B., Bridgewater College; M.Div., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Study, Northern Illinois University. 

Gwendolyn R. Vandon (BTS) Circula- 
tion and Serials Librarian, The 
Library of Bethany and Northern 
Baptist Theological Seminaries 
L.T.A., College of DuPage. 

Murray L. Wagner (BTS) Librarian, 
The Library of Bethany and Nor- 
thern Baptist Theological 
Seminaries Director of Technical 
Services 

B.A., Manchester College; B.D., 
Bethany Theological Seminary; 
Th.D., Chicago Theological 
Seminary; M.A.L.S., Rosary 
College. 

Hyang Sook Chung Yoon (CTU) Tech- 
nical Services Librarian 
A.B., M.A., Seoul National Univer- 
sity; M.L.S., University of Texas, 
Austin. 



134 



INSTITUTIONS WITH WHICH THE CLUSTER 
MAINTAINS SPECIAL RELATIONS 



CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY 
IN RELIGION AND SCIENCE 

Historical Background. The Center 
for Advanced Study in Religion and 
Science (CASIRAS) is an independent 
incorporated institution with an Ad- 
visory Board comprised of ap- 
proximately one hundred in- 
ternationally renowned scholars and 
scientists representing all major 
disciplines. Since 1970, CASIRAS has 
developed an increasingly close af- 
filiation and effective working 
relationship with the Chicago Cluster 
of Theological Schools. 

The purposes of such cooperative 
relationship are to achieve a greater 
integration between the scientific and 
religious models or images concerning 
the nature and destiny of humans in 
the context of the reality which 
created and sustains them, thereby to 
make possible a more effective in- 
terpretation of the long-evolved 
wisdom of our religious heritage. The 
involvement of CASIRAS in the 
following endeavors reflects such pur- 
poses . 

Advanced Seminar in Theology and 
the Sciences. This interschool seminar 
was opened by Meadville/Lombard 
Theological School in 1965 under the 
direction of Ralph Wendell Burhoe, 
and is one of the precursors of in- 
terinsti national Cluster faculty and 
student involvement in an in- 
terdisciplinary research project. The 
seminar and related conferences have 
provided Cluster personnel with op- 
portunities for small-group discussion 
of new insights from the sciences for 
understanding human nature and 
destiny with such internationally 
distinguished scientists (including 
some Nobel Prize winners) as: H. 



Stanley Bennett, J. Bronowski, San- 
born C. Brown, Donald T. Campbell, 
Theodosius Dobzhansky, Alfred E. 
Emerson, Sir John Eccles, Clifford 
Geertz, Benson E. Ginsburg, Garrett 
Hardin, Dwight J. Ingle, Aharon Kat- 
chalasky-Katzir, Hermann Joseph 
Muller, Michael Polanyi, Van Ren- 
sselaer Potter, C. L. Prosser, Arnold 
Ravin, Harlow Shapley, Sol Tax, and 
Anthony F. C. Wallace. Many of the 
papers shared by such scholars in the 
seminar have been published in Zygon 
or elsewhere and represent keys to 
new breakthroughs of the wall 
separating religious and scientific un- 
derstanding. Local and other 
theological faculty have also em- 
ployed the seminar as a forum for 
presenting outstanding papers which 
foster pioneering understandings of a 
more positive relation of religion and 
science and which, upon publication, 
constitute a growing literature for 
such breakthroughs. The current of- 
fering, CCTS T-572: Advanced 
Seminar in Theology and Sciences, is 
described on page 63. 

Fellows and Associates. A limited 
number of theologians and scientists 
from local as well as from West and 
East Coast institutions have been ap- 
pointed Fellows and Associates of 
CASIRAS, sometimes for a sabbatical 
year, where they have written papers 
and books with the benefit and 
guidance and critical review by others 
associated with the Center. Several 
ministers have also come to CASIRAS 
as Associates for extended periods of 
continuing education. Their studies 
have similarly led to significant papers 
in the field, some of which have been 
published . 

Courses. From its inception 
CASIRAS has provided team-taught 



135 



courses for Cluster students pursuing 
basic professional degrees. In 1970-71 
the Center pioneered in organizing the 
Cluster's first year-long sequence, 
"Man and His Environment," which 
involved 12 faculty from 5 seminaries 
and an ecologist from a neighboring 
university, together with some 20 
students from 5 schools. Other in- 
terinstitutionally team-taught courses 
have followed and a description of the 
current offering, CCTS T-472: Com- 
municating the Religious Message in 
an Age of Science, may be found un- 
der Theological Studies V, page 63. 

In addition to offering courses on 
the basic professional degree level, 
CASIRAS has been involved in thesis 
advising for advanced academic 
degrees. Moreover, from the outset 
CASIRAS has participated with 
faculties of Cluster schools in 
academic planning, including the 
development of (1) professional degree 
programs for students preparing for 
ministry and for clergy engaged in 
continuing education; (2) academic 
doctoral studies for future teachers 
and researchers within the framework 
of existing degree programs in the 
Cluster schools; and (3) post-doctoral 
programs for faculty. 

Conferences and Symposia. For 
many years CASIRAS, together with 
its affiliated membership society, the 
Institute on Religion in an Age of 
Science (IRAS), has organized con- 
ferences and symposia on religion and 
the sciences. 

Publishing. CASIRAS is a sponsor 
of the publication Zygon: Journal of 
Religion and Science, one of whose 
editorial offices is housed with the 
Cluster at the Lutheran School of 
Theology. Communications from 
religious and scientific personnel in- 
dicate that Zygon has proven to be a 
valuable resource for those concerned 
to provide more effective in- 



terpretations of the traditional 
religious message in a scientific age. 

Guided Research and Study. 
CASIRAS makes available through 
the Cluster opportunities which are 
unique among American theological 
schools for guided research and study 
in the area of theology and the scien- 
ces. 

For further information contact the 
Center for Advanced Study in 
Religion and Science, 1100 East 55th 
Street, Chicago, Illinois 60615. 
Phone: (312) 667-3500, ext. 268 or 
643-5131 . 

Ralph Wendell Burhoe, Director 

INSTITUTE ON THE CHURCH 
IN URBAN-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY 

The Institute on the Church in Ur- 
ban-Industrial Society (ICUIS), based 
at McCormick Theological Seminary, 
was established in 1966 by the 
Presbyterian Institute of Industrial 
Relations in cooperation with the Ad- 
visory Group on Urban and Industrial 
Mission, Commission on World 
Mission and Evangelism, World 
Council of Churches. While retaining 
these historic relationships, since 1975 
ICUIS has been located with the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools and has established relation- 
ships with a wider range of American 
Denominations. 

The Advisory Group on Urban and 
Industrial Mission, W.C.C., "recog- 
nized the Institute on the Church 
in Urban-Industrial Society as the 
one centre mandated by it to provide 
information and consultation on 
training facilities for urban and in- 
dustrial ministries as well as an in- 
ternational reference centre for 
literature and programme information 
in this field." In line with this mandate 
ICUIS performs a variety of data- 
collecting and program-resourcing 



136 



functions. 

As a center for the gathering of in- 
formation, ICUIS provides an in- 
formation bank which draws upon a 
continuing flow of case studies, 
project reports, articles, correspon- 
dence, books and other materials 
coming out of the church's in- 
volvement in the issues of ur- 
banization, technological change, in- 
ternational justice and human 
development. This material is selected, 
annotated, indexed and distributed 
among a world-wide network in a 
monthly Abstract Service and a 
bibiliographic service. Any of the 
more than 6,000 items in the ICUIS 
files, which are cross-indexed topically 
and geographically can be retrieved 
upon request. Retrieval is facilitated 
by an annual Index to the Abstract Ser- 
vice. The ICUIS information system is 
backed by over 100 file drawers of 
materials on issues, projects and 
studies on urban-industrial mission. 

A recent addition to ICUIS 
publications is JUSTICE MINISTRIES, 
a quarterly dedicated to urban 
ministries in the United States. Each 
quarterly concentrates on a different 
issue with which U. S. urban churches 
are involved. 

Besides linking people engaged in 
the church's world-wide urban-indus- 
trial mission through information ex- 
change, the resources of ICUIS have 
been used 

as models of involvement by those en- 
gaged in urban-industrial and met- 
ropolitan mission programs around 
the world; 

as teaching material by seminary and 
college professors in courses on 
church and society, the theology of 
mission, metropolitan and regional 
development, technology and 
culture, and in continuing education 
and action training programs; 



as research material for students in 
courses or projects related to the 
church's involvement in social 
issues ; 

as a program resource by women's 
associations, couples' clubs, and 
young adult groups in issues related 
to the international dimensions of 
urbanization and technological 
change ; 

as the basis for mission institutes and 
orientation programs for those 
going overseas or for those return- 
ing from overseas assignments and 
for overseas persons assigned to 
ICUIS for periods of specialized 
study and action; 

as the basis for preparing biblio- 
graphies and program materials for 
special program emphases of church 
agencies. 

The resources of ICUIS are 

available to church agencies and local 

churches 

through- the Abstract Service and 
other publications of ICUIS 
which provide up-to-date in- 
formation on the in- 
ternational dimensions of 
the church's urban-industrial 
mission; 

through the indexed material and the 
background files which 
provide program resources 
on the issues of metropolitan 
and technological change 
worldwide; 

through consultation services to help 
plan institutes, seminars and 
conferences of the issues and 
the action involved in the in- 
ternationalization of 

mission ; 

through orientation programs for 
people going overseas in the 
service of the church or of 
secular agencies, and week- 
end seminar for local 
churches. 



137 



Ministers in Industry Program. 

For over thirty years the "Ministers- 
in-Industry" program has put 
seminary students in touch with work 
life in the industrial and service sectors 
of the U.S. economy. During the sum- 
mer of 1981, the eight week program 
will deal with "Future of Work in the 
U.S.: Alternative Forms of Ministry." 
The program's central purpose is to 
develop seminarian sensitivity to the 
issues which U.S. technology and the 
U.S. economy raise for the church's 
ministry. 

Students are employed as wage earn- 
ers in factories and service jobs 
during the summer and participate in 
weekly seminar sessions. The seminar 
outline focuses upon the religious, 
political, ethnic, racial and economic 
concerns of wage earners. Seminar 
discussions draw upon the students' 
reflections and insights arising from 
their work situations. A preparatory 
reading list is provided for the 
sessions. 

Seminar sessions are led by Prof. 
Poethig. Each participant is expected 
to concentrate his/her attention on a 
given area of the work experience and 
to prepare a paper on this particular 
issue. Past papers have included 
diaries and journals, reflections on 
religious attitudes, analysis of ethnic 
and sex competition in work 
situations, rank and file militancy in 
unions, alienation in industrial work. 

Students should begin their summer 
employment by June 14, 1982, or as 
soon thereafter as possible. An orien- 
tation session will be held Thursday, 
June 10, and the final seminar will be 
held during the final week ending 
August 6. Students who desire may 
continue their work beyond the con- 
clusion of the seminar. All papers will 
be due no later than August 31. 

Enrollment is open to students who 
have completed one year of study at 



any accredited theological seminary. 
While the program is offered for 4 
quarter hours' credit, additional 
academic and /or clinical credit may 
be negotiated. Tuition for the program 
is payable to McCormick Theological 
Seminary at its regular rate for the 
number of credit hours sought. Ap- 
plications for admission may be ob- 
tained from ICUIS and should be sub- 
mitted to ICUIS by April 30, 1982. 

For further information, write or 
phone : Institute on the Church in Ur- 
ban-Industrial Society, 5700 S. 
Woodlawn Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 
60637. Phone (312) 643-7111. 

Richard P. Poethig, Director 

Bobbi Wells Hargleroad, 

Documentation Director 

Mary J. Kirklin, Administrative Asst. 

SPERTUS COLLEGE OF JUDAICA 

In 1978 the Chicago Cluster of 
Theological Schools and the Spertus 
College of Judaica, located in the 
Chicago Loop, signed an agreement to 
provide for an exchange of services. 
Formalized was an already working 
relationship of free access to libraries. 
More importantly, the agreement 
provides for free cross-registration for 
students from the Cluster into ap- 
propriate Spertus courses and vice 
versa. Exchange of faculty between 
Cluster Schools and Spertus College is 
also recognized by this agreement as 
appropriate. 

Since Judaic Studies are receiving 
increasing recognition as an important 
element in the training of Christian 
leadership, both as a means for a fresh 
perspective on Christian roots and as 
a way of understanding the other 
major living religion within our 
tradition, the opportunity for ex- 
change with Spertus College provides 
an attractive resource for Cluster 
students. Phone (312) 922-9012. 



138 



CHICAGO THEOLOGICAL 
INSTITUTE 

The Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools enjoys a cordial and fruitful 
working relationship with the Chicago 
Theological Institute (CTI), which is a 
consortium of five theological schools 
located in the northern metropolitan 
area of the city. The member in- 
stitutions of CTI are Garrett- 
Evangelical Theological Seminary 
(United Methodist), North Park 
Theological Seminary (Evangelical 
Covenant), Seabury-Western 

Theological Seminary (Episcopal), 
Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 
(Evangelical Free) and St. Mary of the 
Lake Seminary (Roman Catholic), an 
associate member. Each of these five 
institutions embodies a unique 
theological tradition or 

denominational affiliation which com- 
plements and enriches those repre- 
sented among the nine schools of the 
Cluster. 

By common agreement between the 
two consortia students other than 
those pursuing academic doctorates 
in each member school enjoy tuition- 
free cross-registration privileges in all 
other member schools. Most Cluster 
students thus have broad functional 
access without additional fees to 
significant curricular resources in thir- 
teen theological schools which collec- 
tively represent a richness and diver- 
sity of ecumenical perspectives and 
theological traditions undu plica ted in 
any other local setting. 

The procedures for cross-registering 
into CTI schools are identical to those 
for cross-registering into Cluster 
schools. Information regarding CTI 
course descriptions and schedules is 
available in the office of the dean and 
registrar at each Cluster school. Such 
information may also be obtained 
from the office of the dean or registrar 
of the respective CTI schools : 



Garrett-Evangelical 
Theological Seminary 

2121 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 
273-2511 

North Park Theological Seminary 

5125 North Spaulding Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60625 

583-2700 

Seabury-Western Theological 

Seminary 

2122 Sheridan Road 
Evanston, Illinois 60201 
328-9300 

St. Mary of the Lake Seminary 

Mundelein, Illinois 60060 

566-6401 

Trinity Evangelical Divinity School 

2045 Half Day Road 

Deerfield, Illinois 60015 

945-6700 

CHICAGO AREA COLLEGES 

AND UNIVERSITIES 

In addition to certain informal 
cooperative agreements which the 
Chicago Cluster of Theological 
Schools and its member institutions 
enjoy with various colleges and 
universities in the metropolitan area, 
one or more Cluster schools enjoy for- 
mal relationships with various local 
institutions of higher education. 
Through such relationships students at 
the respective seminaries enjoy 
correspondingly expanded and 
enriched educational offerings as well 
as a variety of significant benefits 
which may include participation in 
joint-degree programs; tuition reduc- 
tion for course work; library 
privileges; and access to health ser- 
vices, cultural activities, and 
recreation facilities. 

The local colleges and universities 
with whom the respective Cluster 
schools enjoy such relationships are 
the following : 

DePaul University (DIT) 

Loyola University (MTS) 



139 



University of Chicago (CTS, CTU, 

LSTC, M/L, MTS) 
University of Illinois At Chicago 

Circle (MTS) 
George Williams College (NBTS) 
Rosary College (MTS) 



Wheaton College (NBTS) 

Full particulars on these several 
relationships may be obtained by con- 
sulting the catalogs of the respective 
Cluster schools. 



CHANGES AND ADDITIONS 



Additions 
Faculty : 

Wilda W. Morris (NBTS) Visiting 
Instructor in Christian Education 
B.A., The American University; 
A.M., The University of Illinois; 
Ph.D., The University of Illinois; 
M.A. in C.E., Northern Baptist 
Theological Seminary. 

Neil W. Gerdes (M/L) See p. 133. 



Courses: 



CCTS 1-461, 462, 463 
Feminist Studies 



These three courses are designed to offer a prac- 
tical way for women to do theology together in 
order to deepen their understanding of the role 
of women in the churches and in society, and to 
discover feminist motifs within traditional 
religious areas of concern, e.g., literature, music 
and art, as well as to prepare those who are 
studying for ministry to assume roles directly 
concerned with issues of social justice, and in 
particular the issue of sexism in its multiple 
forms. The participants will meet for four hours 
once a week throughout the three terms. Using a 
model of collective leadership and learning, in 
which peers are seen as resources and resource 
people are seen as co-learners, the participants 
will focus on the following areas: 1) the 
historical context of women's oppression and its 
effect on the present global reality; 2) the tools 
necessary for feminist analysis and critique in 
order to bring about social change for justice; 3) 
symbols and meaning which express as well as 
help create a feminist perspective. 
Bozeman and Staff Th 12:30 - 4:30 p.m. Fall 

Winter 
Spring 



CTS TEC-452 

Church and Community Studies: THE CITY 

This seminar-laboratory will build on the 
historic tradition of H. Paul Douglass, Samuel 
C. Kincheloe and others, focusing on the ap- 
plication of sociological methods to study the 
church in the changing city. Available 
demographic data will be supplemented by em- 
pirical investigations using techniques of com- 
munity studies, participant observation and sur- 
vey research to develop sociological un- 
derstandings of the city parish. 
Yoshio Fukuyama MW 2 - 3:20 p.m. Fall 

CTS TEC-453 

Church and Community Studies: 

SUBURBIA & EXURBIA 

This seminar-laboratory will focus on areas out- 
side the central city, using research methods ap- 
propriate for the sociological study of suburban 
and exurban communities as well as small towns 
and rural places. 
Yoshio Fukuyama T 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Winter 

NBTS M-486 
Ministry With Adults 

A study of the developmental needs and growth 
patterns of adults will preface student presen- 
tations on selected aspects and styles of adult 
ministry. 
Morris TBA • Fall 

CTS CM-315 
Rituals for Today 

The meaning of ritual and liturgy, with special 
emphasis on sacraments, weddings, and 
funerals. Opportunity to devise rituals of sup- 
port and rituals of passage for use in a 
congregation. 
Eleanor Morrison M 2 - 5 p.m. Winter 



140 



CHANGES AND ADDITIONS 



CTS CM-340 

The Pastor as Enabler of Presence 

A skill . training course, with focus on ex- 
periential ways of sharpening the pastor's skills 
in group development, group observation, 
group leadership, active and accurate listening, 
confrontation and negotiation. Some practice in 
designing models for training lay people in these 
skills as ways of being "present" to each other 
and to those in need— as the priesthood of all 
believers. 
Eleanor Morrison W 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTS CM-421 

Bible Study in the Congregation 

Some approaches to participative Bible study 

with lay people, both in a continuing study 

situation and in one-session situations. A 

variety of structured learning approaches to lay 

biblical education and lay leadership of Bible 

study. 

Eleanor Morrison M 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Spring 

CTS CM-408 

The Ministry as Agent of Social Change 

and Spiritual Guide 

Theology and methodologies for: addressing 
justice issues and controversial concerns 
through pulpit and church; the achievement of 
social decisiveness without absolutization of 
particular positions; a biblical perspective on 
human nature and society applied to concrete 
means of social education and action. Elements 
of a contemporary spirituality will be explored: 
presence as an interpersonal and transcendental 
reality; sacraments and grace in their special 
and general meanings; modalities for "prac- 
ticing the presence" and nurturing spiritual com- 
munity. 
Truman Morrison T 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Fall 

CTS CM-410 

Spiritual Resources for Parish Ministry 

An exploration of: parish ministry as a matrix 
for Christian commitment and the experience of 
Christian community; resources and regimen 
for a deepening of the minister's own 
spirituality, personal faith and interpersonal 
relationships; faith's dialectic of particularity 
and universality as a spiritual resource; the 
minister as spiritual resource for the building of 
a faith community; spiritual resources of the 



"latent" and "manifest" church. 
T. Morrison TTh 9:30 - 10:50 a.m. 



Spring 



CTS CM-455 

Ministry and the Modern Sensibility 

An examination of the problems and creative 
possibilities of witnessing to the Judaeo- 
Christian faith in the "lost provinces" of 
society: the intellectual community and the 
world of the university; the realms of scientific 
materialism and confirmed secularity; the world 
of politics and revolutionary change. A basic 
frame of reference will be the role of 
professional ministry and Christian community. 
The course will draw upon the work of 
representative figures: Kierkegaard and Niet- 
zsche, Dostoevsky, Weber and Marx, Wit- 
tgenstein and Heidegger, Freud and May, 
Beckett and Pomerance, Buber and Tillich. 
T.Morrison T 2 - 5 p.m. Winter 



CCTS M-591 

Pastoral Care : History and Theology 



This quarter will focus on the development of a 
professional understanding of pastoral theology. 
The history of pastoral care in the church will 
be considered, as well as the place of pastoral 
care in the church today and' issues concerning 
pastoral identity. The relationship between 
theological disciplines and psychological 
disciplines will also be dealt with. There will be 
assigned reading, lectures, and seminar 
discussion. 
Ashby F9-12 Fall 

CCTS M-592 

Personality Theories and Therapies 

Consideration of different theories of per- 
sonality and their implication for counseling 
and therapy. We will seek to develop a critical 
understanding of the emphases and an- 
thropologies represented by the various schools, 
together with their respective philosophical 
presuppositions and theological correlations, 
and endeavor to understand their relevance for 
counseling and pastoral care. Case studies will 
be used. Limited enrollment; admission by ap- 
proval of the instructor. 
Swanson F 9 - 12 Winter 



141 



the Chicago cluster 
of theological schools 




CHICAGO 
LOOP 



Bethany Theological Seminary- 
Catholic Theological Union- 
Chicago Theological Seminary- 
DeAndreis Institute of Theology- 
Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago 
McCormick Theological Seminary- 
Meadvi He /Lombard Theological School- 
Northern Baptist Theological Seminary- 



BTS 

CTU 

CTS 

DIT 

LSTC 

MTS 

M/L 

NBTS 



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